Icynene-Lapolla Announces Exclusive Platinum Sponsorship with Spray Foam Worldwide

Icynene-Lapolla announced a Platinum Sponsorship with Spray Foam Worldwide (SFWW). The first and only manufacturer selected for a sponsorship, Icynene-Lapolla is supporting the thriving online spray foam contractors community while leveraging a number of unparalleled promotional opportunities.

“We have been active, daily participants in Spray Foam Worldwide’s community since its inception as we recognized immediately the inherent value in a vibrant on- and off-line community of spray foam contractors,” said Doug Kramer, president and CEO of Icynene-Lapolla. “As the community evolves with the introduction of sponsor partnerships, Icynene-Lapolla is proud to be the only manufacturer included.”

SFWW was founded in 2016 as a private Facebook group for spray polyurethane foam installers to connect about professional jobs and practices, as well as to form supportive relationships. Growing significantly year over year, the group now encompasses thousands of participants including installers, manufacturers, equipment providers and additional industry stakeholders. Growing in sophistication, the community hosts industry events and now offers educational materials, including videos, to educate sprayers on industry best practices. A website to host shared industry resources is currently under development.

“Sprayfoam Worldwide has grown into an 8,000 strong global community of contractors and industry participants and numerous individuals within the Icynene-Lapolla family have been contributing members for many years,” says SFWW founder Bill Bilben. “We are excited to have Icynene-Lapolla as our exclusive manufacturer partner.”

As part of the Platinum sponsorship, Icynene-Lapolla will be given a wide range of promotional opportunities aimed at connecting the company’s brand, building envelope solutions and support services to contractors and installers.

For more information, visit www.icynene-lapolla.com

Iconic White Sands Inn Re-Roofed With Foam System After Hurricane

The White Sands Inn is an eclectic beachfront lodge in Marathon, Florida. Photo: Rachel Price. Photo: Rachel Price

For Rachel Price and her mother, Janice Stephens, the White Sands Inn represented 20 years of hard work and memories. Situated on Marathon, Florida’s Grassy Key, the eclectic beachfront lodge looked out on tranquil blue waters framed by graceful palm trees. Idyllic and serene, White Sands was a vacation home away from home for legions of loyal patrons.

But the oceanfront location that made it so popular with visitors also put it right in the path of Hurricane Irma, one of the most powerful and costly storms ever to hit the United States. After making landfall in Barbuda as a category 5 on September 6, 2017, Irma roared through the Caribbean toward the vulnerable islands at the Sunshine State’s southern tip.

The Keys bore the full brunt of Irma’s Category 4 winds and rain on September 10. The storm then traveled directly north up the entire length of Florida and into Georgia before dissipating, leaving more than $50 billion in damage in its wake, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Office for Coastal Management.

As Price watched the storm build and prepared to evacuate, she worried whether her hotel would survive. When an apprehensive Price finally returned, she found the inn practically in ruins and the roofs of both of the inn’s buildings completely gone. Determined to rebuild and re-open, she knew that a new roof was a top priority. Contractor Charles King used Lapolla roofing products manufactured by Icynene-Lapolla to shield White Sands from the elements and help Price prepare to re-open her doors to guests.

Preparing for a Direct Hit

With one eye on the weather reports, Price began bringing in all of the hotel’s outdoor equipment and battening down anything that could break or cause damage. Then she boarded up the windows, threw some essentials in the car and joined the line of Keys residents and Miamians headed north.

Hurricane Irma ripped the roof off of both of the inn’s buildings and left extensive damage to the interior and exterior of the complex. Photo: Rachel Price.

Evacuating, however, turned out to be a difficult task. With all of Florida in the storm’s path, Price and her mother had no safe place to stop. They eventually ended up near their original home of Cincinnati, Ohio.

Not everyone left. A few “old salts,” as Price calls them, weathered the storm in bars and restaurants. Photographers also traveled to the Keys expressly to document the destructive event.

In the days after the storm, photos depicted catastrophic damage: crumbled walls, demolished homes, crushed trailers, scattered debris, boats in the street and roofs damaged from the Keys to the Florida-Georgia state line. Tagged in online photos of the hotel, Price and her mother had some idea of the situation that awaited them.

Because of damaged and inaccessible roads, Price and her mother couldn’t get back to Grassy Key for two weeks. The first thing she saw when they returned was that one of her buildings, a duplex, was missing a roof, exposing the interior to heavy rains. She found the roof on top of a car she had hoped to save from Irma. The duplex also lost windows, allowing waves up to 10 feet high to cause extensive water damage inside.

Photo: Rachel Price.

The other building, the main complex of the White Sands Inn, sustained serious damage everywhere. Waves had punched enormous holes in the ocean-facing side of the building and sucked everything inside out to sea. Furniture, toilets and showers were simply gone. One room remained salvageable, but it had to be dug out of a mound of sand.

The 4,500-square-foot flat, modified bitumen roof was gone, lifted completely off by the powerful winds and deposited a quarter of a mile away. The 20-year-old roof system was built before newer building codes were enforced, and its drip edge was not properly nailed down.

“The entire roof came off down to the wood,” Price says. “The whole entire roof was just sheared off. It lifted up and split off of the building.”

Steps to a New Roof

Price immediately filled out the Small Business Administration paperwork necessary for disaster loans and began getting quotes from roofing contractors. One of them was Charles “Charlie” King of Southeast Waterproofing and Coatings, a family-owned firm based in Geneva, Florida.

A closed-cell, polyurethane foam was spray applied over a nailable vented base sheet and plywood decking. Photo: Charles King.

He didn’t get the job — at first. Price opted to hire a local contractor who promised to do the roof of the main building as well as the interior, all in a couple of months. After a while, he failed to show up and sent another roofer in his place. By then, many months later, city inspectors had shut down the renovation project and found that the contractor had installed only half of a roof — and it was crooked.

Price went back over her estimates and this time hired King.

Rain was still falling inside the White Sands Inn building the next summer when King and his small crew made the trip to Grassy Key. Having previously made a fast and sturdy repair at the Marathon Community Playhouse and Cinema, King already had a good relationship with the local building department.

King and crew arrived on July 2, 2018. After finding a place to stay in the Keys on a holiday weekend — no easy task — he and his crew restored Price’s roof in just a few days and still had time to go deep-sea fishing before heading home.

A Waterproof Roof for the White Sands Inn

One of King’s primary challenges involved the previous contractor’s botched fix, which had left a low spot in the roof over a main living area. The spot acted as a funnel, channeling rainwater into the building’s interior and causing the ceiling and floor of the building’s second floor to sink.

The roof system was topped with Therma-Flex 1000, a highly reflective acrylic roof coating. Photo: Charles King.

“First, we removed the previous contractor’s single-ply roof and started over on the 4,500-square-foot White Sands Inn roof,” King says. “The building was old and very little space was left for air conditioning ducts between the ceiling and roof.”

The White Sands Inn’s new flat roof included a three-quarter-inch plywood substrate nailed according to code. King constructed a custom gravel stop with a larger top than the previous roof’s, which he then nailed and screwed every four inches, staggered.

“We anchored the face every 16 inches to 2-by-8 fascia,” King explains. “That’s beyond code. I just like the extra protection.”

The crew worked quickly to avoid the inevitable moisture present in tropical areas, especially in the mornings and evenings, and laid down a nailable venting base sheet as the basis of the new roof. Atop this barrier they applied a Thermo-Flex polyurethane foam roof system featuring an acrylic coating.

Framed by palm trees, White Sands Inn looks out at the ocean from Marathon’s Grassy Key. Photo: Rachel Price.

King and Price agreed that the roof system would offer the hotel the best possible protection against tropical storms, rain and intense UV exposure. FOAM-LOK 2800 is a closed-cell, polyurethane foam system used on a variety of substrates for both waterproofing and insulation purposes. Therma-Flex 1000, an acrylic coating designed specifically for roofing applications, protects and preserves roofs from heat, moisture and severe weather.

The crew sprayed the polyurethane foam onto the roof substrate in a sloping shape that channels rainwater toward the building’s intended drainage pathways. Thermo-Prime and Thermo-Flex acrylics were applied on top of the polyurethane foam to completely seal the roof and ensure that everything adhered firmly to every square inch.

The roof system is designed to provide a lightweight and sustainable seamless umbrella over a wide variety of new and existing roof substrates to protect against rain and hail. It also includes a fire retardant and exhibits excellent dirt pick-up resistance.

The crew from Southeast Waterproofing and Coatings finished the roof in time to do some deep-sea fishing. Photo: Charles King.

The system does, however, require a professionally trained roofer who understands the proper application procedures. King works regularly with Lapolla products and installed Price’s roof to stand up to the heat and moisture of tropical conditions for the life of the system.

In fact, King’s customer service is such that when Price called him about a small leak near the fireplace after the roof was finished, he hopped on a plane immediately — only to discover that the issue was not related to the roof at all. He fixed it anyway.

The Return of a Florida Keys Vacation Mainstay

The new roof should help protect the White Sands Inn if another hurricane hits the Keys. King noted that after Hurricane Michael, which devastated the Florida Panhandle in October 2018, most of the few buildings that remained standing had spray-foam and coating roofing systems.

King has a lot of faith in his work, and not without reason. In response to the adage, “They don’t make ’em like they used to,” King says: “You’re right. They don’t. They make ’em much better now.”

An added bonus is that the Thermo-Flex system boosts the R-value of Price’s roof, a plus in an area prone to high heat and direct sunlight. She expects her cooling costs to come down drastically in the near future.

King, who has extensive post-storm repair experience, advises home and business owners to choose state-licensed contractors for their roofing work. The savings promised by the other guys, he says, might end up costing a fortune when the work is either not finished or not done according to code.

Though the roof is completed, interior work is still going on and Price is not sure when the White Sands will re-open for guests. But one thing’s for sure: King and Icynene-Lapolla products helped save Price’s business, and once the White Sands opens, King has a standing invitation to stay at the inn whenever he’s in town.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Southeast Waterproofing and Coatings, Geneva, Florida, www.foamittoday.com

MATERIALS

Spray Polyurethane Foam: FOAM-LOK 2800, Icynene-Lapolla, www.lapolla.com

Acrylic Roof Coating: Thermo-Prime and Thermo-Flex, Icynene-Lapolla

Icynene-Lapolla Names New Chief Executive Officer

Icynene-Lapolla announced it has named Doug Kramer its Chief Executive Officer. Kramer will also retain the title of President. Former CEO Mark Sarvary will become Executive Chairman and will remain actively involved in ensuring the company’s continued success. These changes are effective immediately.

“This shift in leadership is a natural progression for Icynene-Lapolla,” said Mark Sarvary, Executive Chairman of Icynene-Lapolla. “We have now successfully completed the merger of the two legacy spray foam companies, integrating the best of each entity into one extremely powerful organization.”

Icynene-Lapolla has combined all operations and the best practices of both legacy companies while retaining its two industry leading brands – Icynene and Lapolla – and their respective product lines, serving existing and new customers domestically and globally with the high performance, energy efficient building envelope solutions they are accustomed to.

For more information, visit www.Icynene.com and www.lapolla.com.

Roofing Project Keeps Arizona Warehouse Chill

When the original built-up roof on Hensley Beverage Company’s Tucson warehouse was failing, it was topped with a sprayed-in-place polyurethane foam roof system and an acrylic elastomeric protective coating. Photos: Rain Man Roofing

What do Landshark Lager, Stella Artois, 3 Amigos Tequila, Nesquik, and Sunny Delight have in common? All are products distributed by Arizona-based Hensley Beverage Company. And all are favorites of Rain Man Roofing, the contractor that repaired a 100,000-square-foot warehouse roof at Hensley’s Tucson location.

Hensley Beverage Company began in 1955 when Jim Hensley, starting with just 15 employees, delivered 73,000 cases of ice-cold Anheuser-Busch beer to thirsty Phoenix residents. Fast-forward to 2018 and Hensley is among the largest family-owned and -operated beverage distribution firms in the United States.

Today, under the leadership of CEO Robert Delgado, President Andrew McCain and Chairman of the Board Cindy McCain, Hensley Beverage Company is a 30-million-case wholesaler. Cindy McCain is the daughter of company founder Jim Hensley and wife of U.S. Sen. John McCain (R-Arizona). Andrew McCain is the senator’s son from a previous marriage.

The company operates a service fleet of more than 1,100 delivery vehicles and employs more than 1,200 people. Delivery now extends beyond Phoenix into every corner of Arizona. Trucks regularly deliver over 2,500 different beverages to thirsty desert dwellers, including domestic, imported, and craft beers, spirits, wine and non-alcoholic beverages of all sorts.

Beverages like these have to be refrigerated in a climate-controlled distribution warehouse while they are being stored. Some kegs need to be stored at 34 to 38 degrees Fahrenheit. Other products can get by at higher temperatures ranging from 45 to 60 degrees.

But the warehouse can’t control the environment efficiently with a leaky roof. That’s where Rain Man Roofing owner Mark Hughes came in.

Rain Man Roofing, founded in 2010, is one of the highest rated roofing specialists in both Arizona and California. In 2011, Rain Man became a BBB Accredited Business with an A+ rating, which it has consistently maintained. With more than 25 years of experience in the roofing industry, Rain Man is well known for inspecting every roofing solution at both the beginning and end of a job — and providing detailed status reports throughout the entire process.

Rain Man to the Rescue

In early 2018, Hensley’s VP of Fleet and Facilities Anthony Keffer contacted Hughes about roof issues at Hensley’s Tucson facility. Hughes’ roofers had, in September 2017, successfully stopped a leaking roof at another Hensley building in Flagstaff with a simple and affordable restoration solution, so Keffer asked Hughes to take a look at the Tucson site.

Crews from Rain Man Roofing completed work on the nearly 100,000-square-foot section of the warehouse roof in just three weeks. Photos: Rain Man Roofing

Several attempts to fix the roof in-house had failed to solve the problem. But Hughes and Rain Man, along with Erin Easter of Icynene-Lapolla, suggested a re-roof using a roof system of sprayed-in-place polyurethane foam and an acrylic elastomeric protective coating. Hensley accepted the proposal and work on the nearly 100,000-square-foot warehouse roof began.

Hensley inherited the 20-plus-year-old, low-sloped roof of the Tucson distribution facility in January 2016 when the company acquired Anheuser-Busch InBev wholesaler Golden Eagle Distributors Inc. The roof itself consisted of a UV-coated built-up, smooth-surfaced modified roof system over lightweight concrete. The old roof also included a cardboard separator installed between the concrete and a corrugated metal roof deck.

By 2018, the laps in the roof’s membrane no longer functioned properly and roof system failure became increasingly frequent. The lap failures, most likely caused by improper installation and deterioration from constant UV exposure, caused obvious openings in the membrane. Rain Man’s inspectors noticed these problems, as well as related failures in the expansion joints, and worked to come up with a viable solution.

The Repair Proposal

Together, Hughes and Easter proposed installing a spray-in-place polyurethane foam roof system over the existing system. The proposal covers the north end of the building (the 100,000-square-foot portion of the roof), where the majority of the controlled environment warehouse (CEW) is located. Hensley’s budget required that the southern portion of the building be repaired later; this second stage was tentatively set for August 2018.

A 1-inch thick layer of polyurethane spray foam was applied over the entire existing roof system. The foam was also used to form flashings at penetrations. Photos: Rain Man Roofing

The answer to the lap problems was to broom and blow the roof, which entailed cleaning the roof of debris and smoothing out the plies to ensure contact with adhesives. Lapolla Thermo-Prime Acrylic Roof Primer was to be applied to the roof, followed by a 1-inch layer of spray polyurethane foam (FOAM-LOK™ LPA 2800-4G) on top of the primer. Finally, a double-pass application of acrylic elastomeric Thermo-Flex 750 coating would finish the job.

Scheduled to start in April 2018, work was expected to take three weeks to complete and would require two foam rigs and eight full-time roofers with Rain Man’s David Caballero as foreman. Hensley would provide the roofers with a covered staging area (normally used as a patio for side-loaded delivery vehicles), where the crew could store equipment and roofing materials.

The staging area would allow Rain Man to shield its supplies and equipment from the high winds and cold weather. Because the job took place in April, when cold temperatures are common in Tucson, the spray foam would be stored under the patio cover. The colder spray foam gets, the longer it takes to warm it up so it can be used effectively.

The finished product was designed to take advantage of the insulating properties of the original roof, and the new “cool roof” monolithic system overlaying the old one would add R-value to the warehouse. The lightweight concrete separator would be retained so the spray foam wouldn’t fill the low spots in the corrugated metal roof deck, which would be a waste of materials.

Roof System Installation

Rain Man Roofing began the project with a pre-job inspection to discuss the application process of the new roof, go over safety and logistical concerns and keep the team at Hensley in the loop. Hughes prides himself on keeping his clients informed of each step in the roofing process.

Photos: Rain Man Roofing

After the details of the roof application were ironed out, the roofers set up their safety precautions. The Hensley building’s low-slope roof did not pose any unusual safety precautions, but Tucson regularly experiences strong winds that make roofing jobs more dangerous. Bright light also presented a danger to the roofers’ eyes, especially after the white acrylic coating was applied. The light reflected off the roof from the intense Arizona sun can be blinding. Hughes and Caballero made sure that their roofers took appropriate measures against the wind and the blinding light.

During the project, safety meetings were held every morning before work to discuss any danger areas that might present themselves that day. The crew also had to ensure each day that the surrounding area was protected from overspray. Sometimes this involved moving company vehicles away from the building.

Once they climbed up onto the roof, the roofers removed and properly disposed of 830 linear feet of expansion joint. After new expansion joints were mechanically fastened to the existing metal deck, the roof was blown and pressure washed free of dirt and debris. Polyurethane foam requires a completely clean surface to ensure a proper bond.

Thermo-Prime was applied to the prepped roof at a rate of one-quarter gallon per 100 square feet. Next, a 1-inch thick layer of polyurethane spray foam was applied over the entire existing roof system. The foam was also used to form all penetration flashings as needed.

Finally, the white acrylic protective coating was applied evenly to the roof in two passes. Each pass used 1.5 gallons per 100 square feet, adding up to three gallons total as described in the manufacturer’s specifications and 10-year limited warranty requirements.

When All’s Said and Done

After three weeks of hard work, high winds and bright sun, Rain Man completed Hensley’s new monolithic roof system. The new roof, designed to have zero seams and zero breaks between flashings and the roof system, will now stand up to the harsh desert climate and add a minimum of an R-6 insulation value to the controlled environment warehouse.

The Hensley Beverage Company is thrilled with its new roof and ready to contract Mark Hughes and Rain Man Roofing for more work in the future, starting with the southern part of the Tucson facility in August.

Hensley’s Anthony Keffer was also kind enough to provide beverages — non-alcoholic, of course — direct from the warehouse to the roofers working in the hot sun. And in the evenings, they were treated to some Bud Light to celebrate a job well done.

THE TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Rain Man Roofing, Phoenix, Arizona, www.rainmanroofing.com
Roofing Materials Distributor: Icynene-Lapolla, Houston, Texas, and Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, www.icynene-lapolla.com

MATERIALS

Primer: Thermo-Prime Acrylic Roof Primer, Lapolla, www.lapolla.com
Spray Polyurethane Foam: FOAM-LOK 2800-4G, Lapolla
Acrylic Elastomeric Coating: Thermo-Flex 750, Lapolla

Icynene and Lapolla Industries Complete Merger

Icynene U.S. Holding Corp. and Lapolla Industries Inc. announced the completion of their previously announced merger. The combined company is a manufacturer and distributor of spray foam polyurethane foam insulation (SPF) products. Going forward, the two companies will operate as Icynene-Lapolla. Together, the combined business will have offices in Canada and the United States.

“We are excited about the completion of the merger. The two businesses have complementary SPF products and outstanding customer service, and both have a strong commitment to innovation,” said Mark Sarvary, Chief Executive Officer of Icynene-Lapolla.

Doug Kramer, President, Icynene-Lapolla, added, “It is an exciting time for Icynene-Lapolla. We look forward to expanding the use of our innovative products both regionally and worldwide.”

For more information, visit www.icynene.com/en-us and www.lapolla.com.