Talented Team Designs and Installs Multiple Roof Systems for Dickies Arena

Dickies Arena in Fort Worth, Texas, hosts the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo as well as concerts and sporting events. Photos: Trail Drive Management Corp.

The new Dickies Arena in Fort Worth, Texas, was designed to echo the iconic Will Rogers Memorial Center, a historic landmark built in 1934. The site of the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo as well as other concerts and sporting events, Dickies Arena was designed to provide a modern entertainment experience and configurable event spaces that would stand the test of time. The multiple roof systems on the project — including the plaza deck surrounding the arena — were essential in delivering on these goals.

Dickies Arena features a domed main roof with a cupola at the top that pays homage to its historic neighbor. “One of the major themes, especially of the dome roof structure itself, was to have a kind of throwback to the original Will Rogers Center, which is still there,” says Eric Nelson, AIA, RID, CCCA, vice president at HKS, the architect of record for Dickies Arena. “The Will Rogers Center was one of the first buildings of its type to have a long-span steel truss roof system. We used that existing structure as the inspiration for the roof structure inside the arena. We have these very thin, elegant looking trusses that are very art deco.”

The new structure’s domed roof is surrounded by low-slope roofs and complemented by two towers topped with metal roofs. Dickies Arena also features a pavilion with a standing seam metal roof, which sits on a plaza deck that serves as an outdoor event space as well as a giant roof system covering exhibit space and areas for housing rodeo livestock. The venue is also designed to provide excellent acoustics for concerts and features luxurious millwork and finishes throughout to provide a touch of elegance. “I like to say that it’s a rodeo arena, but it’s designed like an opera house,” Nelson says.

It took an experienced team of design and construction professionals to envision and execute the project, including HKS, the architect of record; David M. Schwartz Architects, the design architect; The Beck Group, the general contractor; Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc., the roof system installer; and Sunbelt Building Services LLC, the insulation distributor and installer of the plaza deck.

The Dome

The roof system specified for the dome featured an 80-mil PVC system with decorative ribs manufactured by Sika Sarnafil. “The roof system is one that we use pretty regularly on our large sports projects, the Feltback PVC,” notes Nelson. “It’s a lot more durable than other single-ply roof membranes, so we really like it a lot. Dickies Arena is an arena that wasn’t just built for the next 20 years; it’s meant to be there for the next 100 years, so we wanted to make sure we used nothing but the highest-quality materials, especially with all of the hailstorms that we can get out there in Fort Worth.”

The pavilion has a Fabral double-lock standing seam roof system.

The roof system installer, Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas, tackled the dome roof first, followed by the low-slope sections and the metal roofs. Work on the dome roof began in July of 2018. “The project progressed pretty quickly,” says Jeff Eubank, vice president of Jeff Eubank Roofing Co. “The dome in and of itself was like two different projects. The top half of the dome is pretty workable and walkable, and the bottom 40 percent of the dome is almost vertical.”

The Sarnafil Decor system was installed over an Epic acoustical deck, which posed some logistical and safety challenges. “We had to engineer special anchors because a typical tie-off anchor could not be used,” Eubank explains. “Before we could set foot on the job, we had to engineer special tie-off anchors which nested into the acoustical deck.”

Eubank and a structural engineer worked with Epic Deck to construct anchor points that would meet requirements for fall arrest. The half-inch aluminum, F-shaped anchors were designed to rest in the flutes of the acoustical deck and featured a ring provide a tie-off point. They were set in place using a crane.

Safety concerns included the Texas weather. “Our biggest challenge came with the heat,” says Eubank. “Summers in North Texas are brutal enough, but at the end of last summer, a high pressure system just stalled over Fort Worth. We were in the middle of a drought, with temperatures up to 110 degrees. You’re up on a deck with nowhere to hide, and with it was pushing 200 degrees up there. From a life safety standpoint, we ended up pushing the dome installation to night work.”

The main roof on the arena’s dome was topped with an 80-mil PVC system with decorative ribs manufactured by Sika Sarnafil.

Crews applied approximately 250,000 square feet of material on a near vertical application at night, with lighting provided by six tower cranes. The project required 100 percent tie-off of men and equipment.

The original plan for the dome was to work top to bottom, but as work began, the cupola was incomplete, so the safety and logistical plans had to be radically changed. “We ended up basically making two rings around the dome, doing the near-vertical portion — the bottom 30 or 40 percent — first,” Eubank says. “We moved up and did another 360-degree loop around the top half of the dome once the cupola was done.”

The roof system was installed over the acoustical deck and loose-laid filler. After a 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime substrate board was installed, crews mechanically fastened two layers of Sarnatherm polyiso and 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime. They adhered the Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback membrane, which was produced in a custom color called Agreeable Gray.

After the membrane was installed, the PVC ribs were heat welded into place to give it the look of a standing seam roof. “We installed over 16 miles of custom-color Decor ribbing,” notes Eubank.

The Logo on the Roof

The dome roof also prominently features the Dickies Arena logo, which took some advance planning. “We left an area of the ribs out on the east side anticipating the logo up there,” Eubank says. “That’s in another custom color. Sarnafil ran the custom color and templated the letters. The logo is roughly 130 feet by 10 feet, so we received a giant D, a giant I, a giant C, and so forth. Once these things are installed, there is no pulling them up — your only option is to tear the roof off. So, imagine working with a 10-foot letter, 200 feet up in the air, on a slope, and making sure it’s level.”

Eubank Roofing came up with a plan to use a section of 60-mil PVC membrane as a backer sheet. “We laid out this big backer sheet in Agreeable Gray and stenciled all of the letters across it,” Eubank explains. “We took the backer sheet up, got it lasered and leveled, and installed the solid backer sheet on the dome. It already had the stencils on it, so we were able fall back and install the individual letters. We didn’t need to line them up — we just had to fill in the blanks.”

The last steps in the dome installation included installing ribs in a second custom color to go through the letters. Helicopters also brought in three large Dickies signs, which were placed atop concrete pedestals treated with a Sarnafil liquid membrane.

Flat Roofs and Metal Roofs

On the low-slope sections that surround the dome, the Sarnafil G-410 Feltback was installed over structural concrete and fully tapered polyiso. “There is a tremendous amount of masonry work on this project, and it is gorgeous,” Eubank notes. “It was important, though, on the low-slope portions to let the brick work and stone work wrap up before any roofing membranes were installed.”

The design of the arena echoes the iconic Will Rogers Center, which was the inspiration for the thin, elegant steel trusses.

A vapor barrier was installed over the structural concrete deck. After masonry work was completed, crews installed a fully tapered polyiso system in ribbons of OM Board adhesive, then adhered 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime and the 80-mil PVC membrane.

The complex also features two different metal roof systems from Fabral. On the north side of the building, the two towers were capped with a flat-seam panel. Down at the plaza level, the pavilion was topped with a double-lock standing seam roof system featuring Fabral 24-gauge Galvalume Power Seam panels.

According to Nelson, an area underneath the pavilion serves as a warm-up arena for horses during the rodeo, so the design was meant to evoke a rustic effect. “The cladding on that building is all quarter-inch steel with rivets on it,” Nelson points out. “Galvalume is finished to look like galvanized sheet steel, but it won’t tarnish or turn white or black like galvanized steel would — which is why they selected it — but it still has that kind of throwback look of a barn.”

Out of the Gate

Dickies Arena is now open to the public and is gearing up to host its first rodeo. The experienced team that built it has moved on to other projects, but they look back on their work on the new landmark venue with pride.

“I’m very proud of the people that I work with and the thought and care that they put into the project and the time that we take,” Eubank says. “A lot of our work is negotiated re-roofing, and I think that’s in large part because we take the time to think through a problem and come up with the best solution. I think that’s really highlighted here. You’ve got to take your time and do it right — and do it efficiently.”

Eubank commends the general contractor, H.C. Beck, for a smoothly operating jobsite. “The job was very well managed from a safety standpoint,” Eubank says. “The general contractor did a fabulous job of manipulating trade work and making sure no one was working overtop of anyone else.”

Nelson agrees, crediting the teamwork at every phase of the project for the successful outcome. “The partnership with David M. Schwartz as the design architect really worked very smoothly from our side,” Nelson says. “We worked very well with a talented team of consultants and who specialize in sports design. It’s a one-of-a-kind type of project.”

“My family has been in Fort Worth for five generations, and this is a project I’m just tickled to death about for the city,” says Eubank. “To be part of its install means a lot.”

TEAM

Architect of Record: HKS Inc., Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

Design Architect: David M. Schwartz Architects, Washington, D.C., www.dmsas.com

General Contractor: The Beck Group, Dallas, Texas, www.beckgroup.com

Roofing Contractor: Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, www.eubankroofing.com

MATERIALS

Dome Roof

Roof Membrane: Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback PVC with Sarnafil Decor ribs, Sika Sarnafil, https://usa.sika.com/sarnafil

Acoustical Deck: Epic Metals, www.epicmetals.com

Cover Boards: 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime and 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Low-Slope Roof

Roof Membrane: Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback PVC, Sika Sarnafil

Cover Board: 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific

Metal Roof

Standing Seam Panel: 24-gauge Galvalume Power Seam, Fabral, www.fabral.com

Underlayment: Fabral HT, Fabral

Plaza Deck

Waterproofing Membrane: TREMproof 6100, Tremco, www.tremcosealants.com

Insulation: Foamular 600, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

Brick Pavers: Hanover, www.hanoverpavers.com

Re-Roofing a Planetarium Under the Stars

Photos: Versico

The James S. McDonnell Planetarium is a St. Louis icon. Located in Forest Park, a 1,300-acre public park, the planetarium is the main attraction at the Saint Louis Science Center, one of the few free nonprofit science museums in the country. It serves more than one million people each year. Opened in 1963, the planetarium features one of the world’s best opto-mechanical start projectors, which projects a 360-degree view of the constellations in the night sky onto its domed ceiling.

The giant, white structure is hard to miss, but its roof is hidden from view for those on the ground. The low-slope roof system and penthouse are nearly invisible behind a large, bowl-shaped parapet. The existing roof was saturated with moisture and was starting to develop leaks, and the planetarium’s dome-shaped screen and multimillion-dollar projection system could not get wet.

The Problems

Bade Roofing was just finishing up a re-roofing project at a Science Center warehouse when the company was called in to take a look at the planetarium roof. According to Dave Bade, president of Bade Roofing, and Drew Bade, the project manager, the company determined a total roof replacement was required. They also identified some key challenges.

A crane was used to lift material to the roof and remove debris.

The 4,000-square-foot roof is unusual; it’s perfectly round, yet slightly bowl-shaped, with round penthouse in the center. The unique shape would make it difficult to design a tapered insulation system, flashings, and terminations for the 30-year project. Another difficulty was posed by the concrete step-offs located under the existing roof. There were no dimensions on the original plans, so creating the tapered insulation layout would be especially tricky.

The schedule was also complicated, as the planetarium would remain open throughout the construction process, hosting daily educational presentations for schoolchildren, as well as special events and exhibits. Work couldn’t take place during business hours.

“We had to work at night, craning stuff up there with big lights,” says Dave Bade. “The good thing was the guys couldn’t fall because they couldn’t go anywhere; the roof had an eight-foot wall around it. The safety plan was easy, but the tapered design was tough.”

The Proposal

Bade Roofing decided to go with a SureMB 120TG Base Ply as a temporary roof to ensure the equipment inside the building would be protected throughout the tear-off and installation process. “It was a secondary line of defense that allowed us to remove the entire roof all at once and not have to rely on tie-ins from the old roof to the new one when the crew started and stopped each night,” Drew Bade says.

The existing roof of the James S. McDonnell Planetarium was removed and replaced with a fully adhered 90-mil EPDM system from Versico.

The temporary roof allowed the company to accurately measure the existing roof for the tapered insulation design. “This is another reason we decided to use the SureMB 120TG; it allowed us to really see what was going on with the tapered and make adjustments prior to ordering,” notes Drew Bade.

The roof specified for the final phase of the project was a 90-mil VersiGard EPDM fully adhered system manufactured by Versico. “The Science Center and the architect both have a history of using EPDM on their projects because they’ve had a lot of success with it,” says Drew Bade. “And with the uncommon design and shape of this roof, EPDM was perfect to mold into all the unique angles and it did a good job conforming to the many curves of the building. We used a 90-mil EPDM to get the 30-year warranty the Science Center wanted and for the overall longevity of the roof.”

The Process

Once the crane and light towers were in place, crews began the loading and tear-off process. Crews accessed the roof through a window of the penthouse, but material had to be lifted in place with the crane. The typical workday began at about 5 p.m., and crews worked until 2 or 3 o’clock the next morning.

“We started by priming the concrete deck with CAV-GRIP 3V,” says Drew. “Then we installed the SureMB 120 TG Base Ply.”

The insulation was adhered in Flexible DASH low-rise adhesive. Crews installed a base layer of 2-inch SecurShield polyiso, which has a special facer, followed by a layer of tapered SecurShield polyiso. The drainage areas needed exacting care. “The drains were down in a concrete sump,” says Dave Bade. “We put the drawing right on the roof and cut out each of those sections. It was like cutting a pie into 50 pieces.”

Crews then installed Securock cover board, followed by the 90-mil VersiGard EPDM. “The EPDM did a great job conforming to the building’s angles and curves,” says Drew Bade. “We adhered the EPDM with Versico’s standard Bonding Adhesive because it’s got a long track record and it works.”

Once the tapered insulation was in place, the membrane installation was pretty straightforward, although the circular roof area posed some challenges with the details. “The counter flashings and terminations were kind of tough because everything had to be pre-bent to that radius,” Dave Bade notes. “It wasn’t a tight radius, but everything had to be pre-formed to that exact radius so you could keep constant compression on that membrane.”

The Professionals

The new system qualified for a 30-year warranty. “One of the main benefits of a Versico system, from a contractor perspective, is the support from Versico’s tech reps,” says Drew Bade. “It’s second to none; they make sure the job’s done right and they’re there every step of the way.”

The work was meticulous, and Bade Roofing’s experienced crews took great care to get it right. “The artistic part of it is the roof itself. It’s a shame that no one will ever see it,” says Dave Bade. “We did the work at night, so no one even saw our trucks.”

It’s a satisfying accomplishment to re-roof an iconic structure, even if no one sees you do it. “We really wanted to do this job,” says Dave Bade. “It meant a lot to us because we try to do things that are out of the ordinary. After being in business for more than 60 years, you like project like this because you get to show off your talents. And the men like stuff like this; the ones who got to work on this project, it really meant a lot to them. They are true professionals.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Bade Roofing Co., Inc., St. Louis, Missouri, www.baderoofing.com

Architect: T.R.,i Architects, St. Louis, Missouri, http://www.triarchitects.com

MATERIALS

Membrane: 90-mil VersiGard EPDM, Versico, www.versico.com

Insulation: SecurShield Polyiso, Versico

Base Ply: SureMB 120TG, Versico

Primer: CAV-GRIP 3V Low-VOC Adhesive/Primer, Versico

Cover Board: 1/2-inch Securock, USG, www.usg.com

RCI Issues Call for Abstracts for 2019 Building Envelope Technology Symposium

RCI, Inc. is seeking abstracts for consideration for the 2019 Building Envelope Technology Symposium, which will be held in Louisville, Kentucky, November 11-12, 2019. Abstracts of each paper (200 words) should be received at RCI headquarters by April 18, 2019. The RCI Building Envelope Symposium Committee will review abstracts, and authors will be notified regarding acceptance of abstracts by May 10, 2019. If accepted, papers should be received at RCI headquarters by July 12, 2019, for peer review.

Suggested topics include:
• Innovative Technologies & Practices
• Façade Systems and Technologies
• Unique Façade Design Solutions
• The Building Envelope as a Design
Statement
• Energy Conservation Design
• Designing Façades That Will Improve
Indoor Air Quality
• Economics and Life Cycle Analysis
• Panelized Stone or Masonry Systems
• Sealants – Design and Selection; Appropriate Specification Quality Assurance
• Hygrothermal Analysis in Façade Designs
• Façades Designed to Achieve Sustainability
• Unique Detail Design Work
• Curtain Walls
• Double-Wall Façades
• Roofing
• Brick Masonry
• Stone Masonry
• Waterproofing
• Stucco
• EIFS
• Metal Wall Panels
• Air-Barrier Systems
• Testing Wall Systems
• Construction Processes

Papers and abstracts accepted for presentation may subsequently be published in RCI publications. RCI reserves the right of first publication of all submitted materials accepted for presentation at any event sponsored by RCI and retains the copyright thereafter. All submitted abstracts and papers must be original to the author and not previously published or presented nor scheduled for publication or presentation in any other publication or venue. Exceptions may be granted at the discretion of RCI.

Those interested in submitting an abstract are invited to contact the RCI headquarters for a copy of the Abstract Submittal Form and RCI Guidelines for Presentations, complete directions on formatting, and acceptable formats for abstracts and papers. A topic description must be provided addressing the speaker’s subject knowledge and the level of knowledge that will be presented to the attendee (i.e., beginner, intermediate or advanced). Six RCI CEHs will be granted for an accepted paper. Additionally, presenters will earn triple credit for the length of the program (1 presentation hour yields 3 CEHs).

Note: Owners/clients (if applicable) must have been notified this abstract is being submitted for consideration of a presentation at the RCI Symposium on Building Envelope Technology and have given consent to do so.

For further information regarding abstract and paper submittal, contact:
Tina Hughes
RCI Assistant Director of Conventions and Meetings
1500 Sunday Drive, Suite 204
Raleigh, NC 27607
Phone: 800-828-1902
Email: thughes@rci-online.org

For more information, visit https://rci-online.org.

BLUEFIN Acquires Professional Roof Services, Inc.

BLUEFIN, LLC announced it acquired Professional Roof Services, Inc. (PRSI), a Delaware-based roof consulting company. BLUEFIN, the first roof consulting company to provide mobile assessment, and online analytics and data management to customers, further strengthens its ability to provide quality consulting services to Mid-Atlantic clients. The move reinforces BLUEFIN’s position as the largest, leading consulting group in the industry.

“We’re pleased to welcome PRSI’s exceptional team of experienced roof consultants with an outstanding technical ability to BLUEFIN, and for the opportunity to serve PRSI’s customers and communities,” said Richard Rast, president of BLUEFIN. “We’re committed to PRSI’s growth through expanded service offerings, and we are expecting powerful synergy between our teams to greatly benefit clients.”

Blaine Chipola, PRSI president, founded the company in 1993. Dedicating his career to the highest integrity in roof consulting, Chipola carefully searched to combine PRSI with a company that will continue PRSI’s history of technical excellence and objectivity, while adding resources and capabilities to provide growth opportunities for PRSI’s people and expanded service offerings for customers.

PRSI serves dozens of Mid-Atlantic clients in healthcare, government, education, pharmaceuticals and commercial property management. BLUEFIN’s extensive experience with similar clients across North America and its Maryland office makes this a pertinent transaction.

“This is a great fit for PRSI as we looked for a company that values our employees and customers and provides strong support,” said Chipola. “BLUEFIN’s large support group allows our team to expand our presence and service offerings in roofing, pavement, and building envelope and continue delivering quality projects to new and existing clients.”

This marks BLUEFIN’s second acquisition since it closed on CyberCon Consulting last year. The purchase follows BLUEFIN’s office expansion in Dallas-Fort Worth and growing presence in the Pacific Northwest.

For more information, visit bluefinllc.com.

FlashCo Hires New Plant Managers for Downey and Mt. Prospect Locations

FlashCo Manufacturing, Inc. recently hired Nicolas Valdez for the position of Plant Manager for their Downey facility and Scott Fleming for the position of Plant Manager for their Mt. Prospect facility. Nicolas joins FlashCo with over 17 years of leadership and over 13 years of operational experience. He brings to FlashCo an innovative and knowledgeable approach to analytical problem solving, decision making and team management. Scott joins FlashCo with over 14 years of operations and production management experience. He brings to FlashCo a focus on increasing operational efficiencies related to safety, product quality and production.

Nicolas has a varied background in aerospace, defense and commercial manufacturing through Production Manager positions with Tower Semiconductor, Boeing/Spectrolab and Maneri Sign Company. In addition to his production expertise, Nicolas has extensive experience in cost management, Lean Best Practices, employee engagement and leadership. His manufacturing teams have been highly recognized throughout his career.

“Nicolas experience in manufacturing management will allow him to make an immediate impact at our Downey facility,” says Eric Compton, FlashCo Director of Operations. “His professionalism will be well received by internal and external stakeholders alike. In his short time here he has already shown himself to not only embrace but personify the FlashCo culture.”

Scott has a strong background in plant and manufacturing management gained at operations and production positions with Horizon Steel and ITW Shakeproof. In addition to his plant management expertise, Scott has extensive experience in strategic leadership, Lean Project Management, training development and continuous improvement. Scott has a Bachelor of Science degree from Purdue University and he holds a certification as a Six Sigma Lean Green Belt. In addition, he has certifications in Project Management, Internal Auditing and Corrective Action.

“We’ve been experiencing booming growth at our Mt. Prospect location, and this position was newly created to keep up with the market demand,” says Eric Compton, FlashCo Director of Operations. “Scott comes to FlashCo with a wealth of related experience and we are excited to have him on board. His experience and aptitude will help him lead the location in what we expect to be continually increasing levels of growth and expansion.”

For more information, visit www.flashcomfg.com.

ABC Supply Co. Inc. Acquires the Assets of G & F Roof Supply, Inc.

Building products distributor ABC Supply Co. Inc. has acquired the assets of G & F Roof Supply, Inc., a distributor of roofing products, which is located in California. The company will continue to serve customers out of its three locations at 1225 E. Cerritos Ave. in Anaheim, 13555 Imperial Highway in Whittier, and 521 W. 182nd St. in Gardena.

The acquisition will increase ABC Supply’s footprint in the largest metropolitan market on the West Coast and allow the company to build stronger relationships with local contractors. Current G & F Roof Supply associates will continue to work at the locations, providing a seamless transition for customers.

“The G & F Roof Supply team has built a great reputation among Los Angeles and Orange County area contractors,” said Matt Cooper, vice president of ABC Supply’s West Region. “We look forward to welcoming contractors who have been working with G & F Roof Supply and providing them the products and service they need to get their jobs done.”

For more information, visit www.abcsupply.com.

Rheinzink Names Canadian Sales Manager

RHEINZINK America has appointed Richard Strickland as Regional Sales Manager, Canada. Strickland will be headquartered in Toronto.

Strickland has extensive experience with construction products and was previously technical sales manager with iSPAN Systems, L.P. in Princeton, ON.

“Canada continues to be an extremely important market for us,” said Chip McGowan, president of RHEINZINK America. “We’re delighted to have Richard onboard to assist and support our distributors and systems partners. And his hands-on experience with metal products makes him a real asset in working with architects and installers.”

Strickland has a degree in Mechanical Engineering Technology from Fanshawe College.  “The opportunity to work with a natural, living metal is particularly exciting to me,” Strickland said. “The longevity and sustainability of RHEINZINK really make the material a desirable option for designers.”

RHEINZINK America, Inc. led the introduction of architectural zinc in North America and continues to offer one of the industry’s most reliable, trusted brands. Architects and contractors are supported by unparalleled customer service and technical assistance.  RHEINZINK is readily available through an established network of qualified distributors and systems partners across the United States, Canada and Mexico. Ideal for roofing, façade, gutter and interior applications, RHEINZINK is environmentally friendly, 100 percent recyclable and offers a potential lifespan of 100 years or more.

For more information, visit www.rheinzink.us.

Zinc Roof and Wall Panels Add Sense of Movement to Chicago Boathouse Project

The Eleanor Boathouse at Park 571 is the last of four new boathouses and river launches created by the Chicago Park District to reclaim the Chicago River for water-based recreation. Photos: Courtesy Studio Gang, © Tom Harris

The new Eleanor Boathouse at Park 571 in Chicago’s Bridgeport neighborhood creates the opportunity for greater community recreation and environmental stewardship of the Chicago River. Designed by Studio Gang Architects, the 19,000 square-foot facility is the last of four new boathouses and river launches created by the Chicago Park District to reclaim the Chicago River as a major system of parks and water-based recreation.

The unique form of the two-building boathouse reflects the movement of rowing, according to Studio Gang’s founding principal Jeanne Gang. The design, incorporating alternating roof trusses, was influenced by studying the rhythm and motion of rowing. “The Chicago River boathouses are part of a new environmentally friendly vision for the city’s river,” says Gang. “By making the riverfront a destination for recreation, anchored by dynamic sustainable architecture, we hope to catalyze long-term stewardship and support of the river’s remediation.”

The striking design incorporates zinc panels from Rheinzink in both roof and facade applications. Approximately 23,000 square feet of Rheinzink prePATINA blue-grey Double Lock Standing Seam Panels cover the roof of both buildings. An additional 10,000 square feet of the company’s Flat Lock Tiles clad the facade in a diagonal installation.

Zinc panels were also used to clad one of the other four boathouses completed earlier and also designed by Studio Gang Architects. The WMS Boathouse at Clark Park on the northwest side of the city was the second of the new boathouses to open and utilized 7,000 square feet of vertically-oriented Rheinzink Flat-Lock Tiles for the facade.

The unique form of the 19,000 square-foot facility was designed to reflect the movement of rowing. Photos: Courtesy Studio Gang, © Tom Harris

The panels for both projects were fabricated by Rheinzink systems partner Sheet Metal Supply Ltd. (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois. Installation of the panels on the Eleanor Boathouse was done by Bennett & Brosseau, Inc., Romeoville, Illinois.

The panels chosen for the project were the result of an exhaustive search that ruled out more expensive alternatives. “Rheinzink reduced the cost and provided the great diagonal look that Studio Gang wanted,” says Bennett & Brosseau project manager Ryan Broom. “It’s a ‘full zinc’ job with both the facade and the roof and really turned out nice.”

SMS vice president Ben Kweton credits Broom with providing the invitation to become involved in the project. “When Bennett & Brosseau approached us with the value engineering opportunity, we jumped at the chance to provide pricing and to remind the design team of the success of Rheinzink on the earlier boathouse project,” Kweton says.

The design team also opted for a slightly hybrid version of traditional flat lock panels. “The tiles we fabricated had a slight offset at the top to bring the panel overlaps more into plane and to create a slight reveal,” Kweton says.

Broom finds working with zinc rewarding, noting, “It provides a great quality look and allows more architectural detailing than can be done with many other metals.”

TEAM

Architect: Studio Gang Architects, Chicago, www.studiogang.com
Metal Fabricator: Sheet Metal Supply Ltd. (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois, www.sheetmetalsupplyltd.com
Installer: Bennett & Brosseau, Inc., Romeoville, Illinois, www.bennettandbrosseau.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: prePATINA blue-grey Double Lock Standing Seam Panels, Rheinzink, www.rheinzink.us
Wall Panels: Flat Lock Tiles, Rheinzink