ARMA Launches New Website

Homeowners and professionals seeking asphalt roofing help can find guidance and technical information easier now that the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has launched its revamped website.

Asphaltroofing.org has many new design features, including improved functionality and enhanced content that boosts usability and user-friendliness. ARMA’s sleek, new modern website provides:

  • Improvements to navigation and ease of searching
  • A simplified front page to better direct visitors to relevant information
  • Two main entry points for homeowners and professionals
  • A redesigned contractor awards submissions page that saves when visitors exit out
  • A more streamlined bookstore, which is categorized by eBook, Print-On-Demand and Print
  • Enhanced ease of mobile viewing
  • An updated photo gallery that provides entry point into ARMA member company websites
  • The consolidation of informational roofing resources, videos and materials

“The ARMA website is popular with both homeowners and roofing professionals because we are able to provide them with guidance and education on asphalt roofing systems in one easy-to-use place,” said Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “Whether it’s homeowner tips for choosing the right type of asphalt shingle for their home or providing resource materials to commercial building owners or professionals on installing and maintaining their commercial roofing system, ARMA is the industry authority.”

The website’s main page will primarily feature three main points of entry, the Guide for ProfessionalsGuide for Homeownersand the Quality Asphalt Roofing Case Studies (QARC) awards, making navigation to points of interest and relevant information easier and faster.

Visitors to the ARMA website can also find educational resources and publications for installation, application and other technical matters. In addition, links to ARMA’s LinkedInYouTube and Facebook pages provide visitors additional resources to stay up-to-date on news regarding asphalt roofing.

For more information visit www.asphaltroofing.org

 

Contractor Restores the Roof on the Museum Beneath St. Louis’ Historic Gateway Arch

Western Specialty Contractors restored the roof of the Museum of Westward Expansion located beneath the Gateway Arch in St. Louis. This photo shows the protection board being installed prior to adding the leak detection system.

Western Specialty Contractors restored the roof of the Museum of Westward Expansion located beneath the Gateway Arch in St. Louis. This shows the protection board installed prior to adding the leak detection system.

The St. Louis branch of Western Specialty Contractors recently completed a project to restore and waterproof the roof of the Museum of Westward Expansion located beneath the iconic Gateway Arch on the St. Louis Riverfront. The work is part of a multi-phase project, spearheaded by nonprofit organization CityArchRiver Foundation, to expand and renovate the underground museum, plus renovate the grounds surrounding the Arch. The Jefferson National Expansion Memorial, which includes the Gateway Arch, Museum of Westward Expansion and the surrounding park, is maintained by the National Park Service.

Opened to the public in 1976, the Museum of Westward Expansion has undergone very few changes since its grand opening. The size of a football field, the museum features rare Native American Indian artifacts and materials documenting the days of Lewis and Clark and the 19th century pioneers who shaped the history of the American West.

Work on the 100,000-square-foot museum roof project began with removing sod and sandy soil covering the top of the roof and 10-28 inches of Elastizell engineered fill using a bulldozer. Next, the existing waterproof membrane was removed from the structural concrete deck.

After two layers of modified bitumen sheet waterproofing were installed, crews apply a coat of adhesive to adhere the asphaltic protection board.

After two layers of modified bitumen sheet waterproofing were installed, crews apply a coat of adhesive to adhere the asphaltic protection board.

Once the deck was exposed, Western crews went to work identifying and repairing leaks in the existing museum lid that had been present for many years, as the existing waterproofing had exceeded its lifespan. Several methods were used to evaluate the condition of the structural concrete deck, which included a chain-drag sounding along with visually identifying delamination and cracks.

Western crews then installed a two-ply Laurenco modified bitumen sheet waterproofing system covered with WR Meadows PC2 protection board. An electronic leak detection system followed by a permanent leak detection grid system were installed over the protection board. Crews then installed a layer of 1-1/2 inch, 60-psi Dow extruded polystyrene with an additional layer of the protection board and a J-Drain 780 drainage mat.

The next phase of the project involved waterproofing the 42,000-square-foot horizontal lid and the 37,000-square-foot vertical walls of the museum addition. Western’s scope of work in this area included installing a two-ply modified bitumen sheet waterproofing and protection board, as well as an electronic leak detection system, along with two layers of extruded polystyrene. A layer of extruded polystyrene was also installed on the vertical walls, followed by the drainage mat on both the horizontal and vertical walls.

During portions of the project Western crews were working over occupied space, as the museum was largely operational during construction.

During portions of the project Western crews were working over occupied space, as the museum was largely operational during construction.

Additional waterproofing of the north and south museum entrances encompassed approximately 13,800 square feet, which included approximately 5,000 square feet of deck around each leg of the Arch.

The museum was largely operational during construction, and for much of the project Western crews were working over occupied space. The company sequenced the removal of existing roofing material so that they could remove, clean and install new roofing material daily to keep the museum dry during construction.

Testing was a daily requirement during the waterproofing installation. Western was required to complete a pull test for every 500 square feet and take moisture readings for every 100 square feet. Daily observation reports had to be completed during the waterproofing application, with all testing results and location tests documented along with the weather conditions. Additionally, Western crews took 50 photos daily to document the testing and work area.

Construction on the Arch grounds began in August 2013, while renovations to the museum and visitor center began in April 2015. The multi-phase project is still underway, and the improved underground Museum of Westward Expansion is expected to be finished by summer 2018.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Western Specialty Contractors, St. Louis, Westernspecialtycontractors.com

MATERIALS

Waterproofing System: Laurenco Waterproofing, Laurencowaterproofing.com
Protection Board: WR Meadows, WRmeadows.com
Extruded Polystyrene: Dow, Dow.com
Drainage Mat: J-Drain, J-Drain.com

Steep-Slope Projects: Risks, Considerations and Best Practices for Contractors

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Many contractors treat residential roofing as routine. However, whether a re-roof or new construction, each project can be infinitely complex and should be addressed as such by always accounting for weather and safety issues, as well as proper installation and customer service.

One of the most prominent and popular elements of residential architecture is a steep-slope roof. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), steep-slope roofs have slopes greater than 4:12 and range from 18.5 degrees to 45 degrees or more. While the process of installing a roof with these angles isn’t necessarily much different from a low-slope roof, it can pose more risks and considerations for workers.

Weather Woes

Weather plays an important role in every roofing project, but staying on top of potential issues from Mother Nature is especially crucial during steep-slope jobs.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

In high temperatures, workers may fall victim to heat cramps, heat exhaustion, heatstroke or worse. The best way to beat the heat is to start early and get as much done as possible before the temperature peaks. Starting early in the summer—specifically in the South—can allow work to be completed before daily rain showers roll in. Proper hydration and attire are also important.

Cold temperatures can create even more complications because some manufacturers advise against installing their products in weather below 45 degrees Fahrenheit and certain equipment is susceptible to freezing. Furthermore, workers have to pay extra attention to the grip of their shoes to avoid slipping and falling. Not to mention, freezing-cold hands and feet may cause an otherwise adept worker to become clumsy. Wearing the proper clothing is key during cold-weather jobs, and workers should be advised to keep an eye out for the first signs of frostbite, including cold skin, redness, tingling and numbness.

Safety Considerations

In 2015, falls were the leading cause of private-sector work deaths in the construction industry, accounting for nearly 40 percent of worker fatalities, according to OSHA. In addition, OSHA reports nearly 90 percent of fatal falls happen due to the lack of a fall-protection system.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

When working on a roof slope greater than 4/12, OSHA requires additional safety measures, which include either a guardrail system with toeboards, safety net systems or personal fall arrest systems. Yet, many contractors—especially residential roofers—choose to forgo protective devices because they feel they are not feasible or create a greater hazard. In such cases, OSHA does allow the use of alternative fall-protection methods in residential construction, as long as contractors develop a written, job-specific fall-protection plan that complies with OSHA regulations.

Proper Installation

During the installation process, roofers should keep a few things in mind whether they’re applying shingles to a steep-slope or low-slope structure.

  • Valleys
Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Valleys are a critical part of proper roof installation because they experience the most water flow during rainstorms and can be potential leak points.

In an open valley, a piece of aluminum, copper or other type of metal is used to help keep rainwater flowing off the roof. Open valleys are often used when a homeowner wants a showier look, such as on a Colonial-style home.

Closed valleys—the most common valley installation method—use asphalt shingles and offer a more traditional look. When properly installed, they keep water from getting trapped in the valley and allow for proper drainage.

In addition to open and closed valleys, contractors also have the option to create a weave valley, which alternates shingles through the valley from both sides, creating a braid-like effect.

Laminate/architectural shingles should not be used for weave valleys. Because laminate shingles aren’t one-dimensional, they do not create the flat surface needed for a weave valley, which should only be used with three-tab shingles.

When using laminate shingles, be sure to follow instructions on the wrapper for either an open or closed application.

Contractors also need to be extremely careful around obstacles such as chimneys and skylights, which require their own flashing and water divergence methods. For instance, more flashing may be needed in these areas to divert water and prevent leaks.

  • Starter Shingles

Starter shingles allow the first course of shingles to properly seal down, protecting the edge of the roof and providing anchoring power for high-wind resistance at the critical eave and rake areas. They further protect the roof by filling in spaces under the cutouts and edges for the first course of exposed shingles, preventing wind uplift.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

The most common mistake when installing starter shingles or modifying traditional three-tab shingles is putting them on backward or upside-down.

Additionally, the overhang should be no more than three-quarters of an inch to prevent wind from penetrating beneath shingles, as well as to keep shingles from curling or cracking.

In addition, many manufacturers caution against double-stacking pallets of starter shingles, which can cause the bottom shingles to warp. Be sure to read all storage and handling instructions prior to installation.

  • Underlayment

Underlayment is an important part of the roofing process and is required by code for residential properties to meet Class A fire requirements. Serving as a secondary barrier, underlayment protects rakes, eaves and critical flashings from water infiltration. Most warranties also require underlayment for the roof to be ASTM compliant. However, some contractors still opt not to use it because they want to save time on a project or their customer balks at the cost.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Another frequent error during underlayment installation is incorrect overlaps. On low-slope roofs (slopes between 2:12 and 4:12), underlayment should have double coverage. And while traditional installation is fine on steep-slope roofs, always follow manufacturer instructions for overlaps from course to course.

Last but not least, be sure to keep underlayment from wrinkling, which can cause ripples in the shingles. While trying to keep underlayment as flat as possible, avoid pulling it too tight because it has a natural expansion and contraction. If underlayment gets wet, be sure it adequately dries out before continuing the installation process.

  • Shingles and Nails

Shingles should be installed with the manufacturer’s recommended offset, which will help prevent leak points and also properly align the shingles across the roof. Once all of the shingles are aligned, only the shingles themselves should be exposed—not the nails.

Because the common bond area is the strongest part of a shingle, manufacturers require nails be placed there to achieve the advertised wind performance. Nails should not be too high or too low, or unevenly spaced. If nails aren’t positioned correctly, the manufacturer’s wind warranty may not be valid.

Customer Service Follow-Up

Providing excellent customer service is key to every roofing job. Homeowners who have a good experience are more likely to share positive reviews and opinions.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Before starting a steep-slope project, be sure to discuss the entire process with homeowners to ensure that they know what to expect, as well as the types of warranties they will receive with their new roof. In addition, prepare the surrounding property, such as windows and landscaping, to prevent damage during the installation process.

During the job, be sure workers are vigilant about not dropping nails anywhere on the jobsite. After the job, walk the property with the homeowners to ensure all debris and materials were cleaned up; magnets can be used to double-check for stray nails. If the homeowners are happy with the finished product and their experience, don’t be afraid to ask them to write a nice review on the company website, Angie’s List, Yelp or other customer referral app.

Most of the best practices for steep-slope roofing can be applied to any type of roofing project. However, steep-slope work can pose additional challenges that other projects may not. Always follow manufacturer’s instructions and OSHA guidelines on all roofing jobs, but especially on steep-slope projects, when one minor slip could turn into major consequences for all involved.

 

New Shingles Speed Up Installation Process in First Test in the Field

This residence in the Atlanta area

This residence in the Atlanta area is the first house in the country to have Atlas shingles with HP42” technology installed on its roof. Photos: Atlas Roofing

Atlas shingles with HP42” technology, a new format introduced in July, were recently installed on a home in the Atlanta area. It is the first roof in the country to be installed with the new shingles, and the homeowner, contractor and manufacturer are all pleased with the results.

Larger than any shingle currently made in the United States, the HP42” shingle format results in a faster installation, as well as significant savings in labor and materials for contractors, according to the manufacturer. HP42” format shingles are the new standard for the Atlas StormMaster Shake, Pinnacle Pristine and ProLam shingle lines.

“These new high-performance HP42” format shingles are larger and better engineered, which makes them easier and faster to install,” says Paul Casseri, product manager of Atlas Roofing Shingles and Underlayment Division. “As a result, contractors and crew can expect a drastically improved installation experience.”

Faster on The Roof

Contractor Dirk Gowder of Ryno Roof in Atlanta says the HP42” shingle format made the project a breeze. “The larger shingle sped up installation time by about 10 percent because there’s less waste, more courses per run, and there’s less cutting of the shingles,” Gowder explains.

With the benefit of using fewer shingles and experiencing less waste, this particular job was easily completed in one day, giving Gowder’s guys plenty of time to do the finishing touches and clean up around the home.

The Ryno Roof crew also installed Summit 60 Synthetic Underlayment, Atlas Pro-Cut 10X Starter Shingles and Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge Shingles featuring Scotchgard Protector, which helps a home maintain its appearance by resisting ugly black streaks caused by algae. The project used Atlas Pinnacle Pristine shingles in Pristine Hearthstone, seamlessly mixing both HP and HP42” format shingles on the roof.

Mix and Match

“The install process, even with the mixed shingles, couldn’t have been simpler,” Gowder says. “It was an easy transition from the standard-sized shingles to the 42-inch shingles. The new HP42” format shingle fits the pallet perfectly, so all of the shingles were nice and straight and flat when we opened every single bundle. My guys moved through the install just like they would have if this were a standard roof job with only one type of shingle. The Atlas quick start guide had clear, easy-to-follow instructions that made the job go smoothly.”

The shingle is a full 42 inches wide and 14 inches high

The shingle is a full 42 inches wide and 14 inches high, with a 6-inch exposure. It features an enhanced 1½-inch nailing area. Photos: Atlas Roofing

The old format of the Atlas HP shingles and new HP42” format shingles both have the same 6-inch exposure, which allows them to be mixed on a roof—as long as the products come from the same plant. Shingles made in different plant locations may contain a different granule blend and can vary in color.

For any roof installation, contractors should follow the manufacturer’s printed installation instructions, which include keeping the shingle seams outside 5 inches of each other in relation to the shingles in the previous and proceeding course when mixing the shingle sizes.

“After using HP42” format shingles on the test house, I’m going to start using them on all of my jobs because they make installation easier and faster and save me money because I don’t have to order as many bundles since they produce less waste,” Gowder states.

The roof qualifies for the Atlas Signature Select Roofing System warranty, which comes with a built-in extended protection period.

“The quality Atlas products, backed up by the Signature Select coverage, will protect this home for a long time,” Gowder says.

Kuiken Brothers Company Publishes On-line Moulding Design Guide

Kuiken Brothers Company announces the publication of their on-line Moulding Design Guide, a replica of architectural pattern books which would have been common throughout the United States in the 19th and early 20th centuries. This digital resource features interior elevation drawings of over forty moulding combinations, including full room packages, cornice combinations and mantle designs using profiles from their in-stock collection. Detailed drawings and photos can be downloaded directly from the company’s website here: Kuiken Brothers Moulding Design Guide. Moulding profiles are in-stock and ready for shipment to projects throughout the United States.

Many of the moulding combinations found within Moulding Design Guide are created with profiles from Kuiken Brothers’ in-stock Classical Moulding Collection. These profiles are based off of classical and traditional designs discovered through the company’s research of the Library of Congress’s Historic American Building Survey and with the oversight of a historic moulding expert. These Classical Moulding profiles have been categorized by architectural styles including Early American, Georgian, Federal, Colonial Revival, Greek Revival and Traditional Revival.

The origin of pattern books can be traced back to first-century Roman architect Vitruvius in his Ten Books on Architecture which explained architectural orders for entablatures, entranceways and columns. 16th Century Italian architect Andrea Palladio wrote architectural books that inspired Europeans and Americans on home and building design elements. This set a precedent for American craftsmen who had access to many different pattern books that detailed drawings for whole house styles and interior architectural how-to illustrations for field fabrication and installation. Just prior to the Twentieth Century, industrialization created a need for affordable housing for the growing working class, replacing traditional pattern books with whole house mail-order catalogs from companies such as Sears, Roebuck & Co., and Montgomery Ward. Until the launch of Kuiken Brothers Moulding Design Guide, there has been a void of accessible millwork pattern books for builders, remodelers, architects and designers.

The Moulding Design Guide is accessible through Kuiken Brothers responsive design website, allowing installers and specifiers to access them on jobsites through their mobile devices. Once a particular style has been chosen, builders, remodelers and architects can contact Kuiken Brothers to discuss the needs for their specific project.

Metal Roofing Installation App Gives Instant Access to 3-D Animated Video Tutorials

Union Corrugating Co. has released its MyMetalRoof Install Wizard for iPhone and iPad.

Union Corrugating Co. has released its MyMetalRoof Install Wizard for iPhone and iPad.

Union Corrugating Co. has released its MyMetalRoof Install Wizard for iPhone and iPad. This app will benefit contractors, dealers and homeowners by giving instant access to the 3-D animated, easy-to-follow video tutorial for their metal roofing installation.

Customers are able to see detailed video instructions for each step of an installation, and being able to access this tool ahead of the installation or at the job site provides an advantage.

Available now for its MasterRib product, Union plans to make this available for all of its roofing systems.

Western Colloid Announces Territory Sales Manager

Western Colloid has announced the addition of Rick Boyce as territory sales manager for Texas and the Midwest.

Rick brings with him extensive experience in roofing with more than 40 years in contracting and manufacturing. “His knowledge of different types of roofing systems as well as the installation and restoration challenges that can come up on a roofing project make him the perfect addition to the Western Colloid team.” says Greg Hlavaty, general manager. “Rick brings skills that are very important to Western Colloid, such as the ability to provide solutions for the contractor.”

Rick will be responsible for promoting Western Colloid products, helping establish a distribution center in the Dallas/Fort Worth area, and developing relationships with contractors, specifiers and building owners throughout the region.

“Although we have been previously seen as a western states-based manufacturer, the last few years have shown increased demand throughout the U.S. An expansion into Texas is a natural next step for us.” says Hlavaty. “We feel very fortunate that Rick agreed to be part of our team and we look forward to building our business in the state of Texas.”

Quality Assurance

As all of us in the roofing industry are keenly aware, roofing work is fraught with exposure. If the installation quality is poor at any time, there is real risk that the entire structure and its contents can be damaged or destroyed. Depending on the size of the loss, the result could be absolutely crippling for any roofing contractor to absorb. Unfortunately, there is no magic formula for quality; what works for one company may not work for another. I do feel strongly, though, that the emphasis on quality has to permeate your entire organization, top to bottom.

For our office, McHenry, Ill.-based Metalmaster Roofmaster, the process begins as early as the pre-award, bidding and estimating phase of the project. Our seasoned estimators carry years of industry experience and are always looking to identify, from the project plans and specifications, issues with the specified products or system, the effectiveness of which often depends on the season in which the roof is being installed. What frequently happens is that we end up recommending a change to the specified system type or installation method to better accommodate project or weather conditions, which will consequently result in a better installation in the end.

This review process does not end there. Post-award, the project moves to our submittal department, which serves as yet another set of eyes to review the plans and specifications for effectiveness of the specified roof system and installation. Our submittal technicians fulfill an office quality-control function to ensure the system products and installation are, in fact, best suited for that particular project. As part of the department’s review, the submittal department works closely with our valued manufacturing partners to elicit feedback and confirmation on the final submittal package. If changes to the plans and specifications are warranted, they are addressed timely and prior to roofing installation—during the submittal process.

The end result is that, by the time the project moves to our project management department for the actual installation, the groundwork for a quality installation has been laid because the products, manufacturers and installation methods have been carefully reviewed multiple times to ensure maximum effectiveness and applicability to the project. Unfortunately all system and
product changes have already been made and approved. All that is left is for our trained field crew to install.

Just prior to the actual field installation, our project managers and superintendents carefully review the plans, specifications and approved shop drawings. The site is reviewed to identify site issues that could potentially affect the quality of the installation. The project documents are furnished to the project foreman, who reviews and discusses the most effective means and methods with the superintendent and project manager. Throughout the course of the installation, open communication among the project manager, superintendent, foreman and field crew is encouraged to proactively discuss and address issues and concerns. At times, a third-party consultant is retained to perform an objective inspection of the roofing installation and to offer suggestions.

Once the installation is complete, we utilize our service department personnel to visit the site and perform any touch-up and detail work prior to the final manufacturer’s inspection. The manufacturer’s representative is accompanied during his inspection by one of our field staff, so that any and all concerns can be addressed and corrected on the spot and manufacturer
approval can be furnished and warranties issued in a timely manner. Owner and architect punchlists are dealt with similarly and, at that point, the owner and general contractor have assurances as to the quality of the roof installation.

It goes without saying, quality of installation is and always will be absolutely critical to the success of Metalmaster Roofmaster. Being able to point to a long history of quality installations has directly impacted our ability to earn new and repeat business, maintain and increase company profitability, build our reputation in the industry, gain manufacturer certification and recognition, reduce insurance premiums, achieve adequate bonding capacity and rates, and a litany of other items. Although we invest a substantial amount of time and resources into the process to ensure the quality of installations, the investment is small relative to the peace of mind and other tangible benefits achieved by maintaining a consistent record of quality roof installations.

Ridge Vent Is Composed of Natural Fibers

Roof Saver Rolled Ridge Vent

Roof Saver Rolled Ridge Vent

Roof Saver Rolled Ridge Vent is a sustainable, 100 percent natural fiber vent that won’t deteriorate or corrode from ice, snow, rain or wind and meets or exceeds all national building code requirements. The unique product promotes uniform ventilation, protecting the roof and shingles from excessive heat or condensation.

Roof Saver now offers Attic Ventilation System product videos to provide helpful guidance to roofing contractors with proper planning and installation of the attic ridge vent. Access the YouTube videos through the company’s website through the Installation tab. View videos anytime, anywhere on your mobile devices.

The Planning the Job video, describes necessary steps to ensure an adequate ventilation system is prepared before work begins on the roof. The Installation video is an instructional overview for proper installation of Roof Saver Ridge Vent.