Contractor Overcomes Challenging Logistics to Re-Roof 16-Story Westin Savannah

The Westin Savannah site posed logistical challenges, as it is bordered by the Savannah River, a canal and the Savannah Convention Center. Photo: SOPREMA

Were you to visit Savannah, Georgia, the Westin Savannah Harbor Golf Resort and Spa would be tough to miss. This landmark property, known for its 18-hole PGA golf course, secluded beach access and on-site spa, is the tallest building in the city at 16 stories. The aura of luxury surrounding the building was threatened, however, when Hurricane Matthew moved through the region, inundating the city with rainwater and causing the aging Westin Savannah roof to fail. With leaks resulting in the closure of a major portion of the hotel’s upper floor, it was clear the building owners would need to move quickly to restore a waterproof seal atop their building.

The job would not be easy. The Westin Savannah is surrounded by the Savannah River on one side, a canal on another and the Savannah Convention Center on a third. The only feasible area left to stage and load the roofing material onto a crane was the front parking loop and valet area — an area that would typically be avoided with any other roofing project. “We only had one spot where we could set up, and that was the biggest challenge,” says Larry Hoffman, the superintendent who oversaw the installation of the roof at the Westin Savannah on behalf of Whitco Roofing, the Westin’s chosen contractor. “We were very limited with regard to any mobility around that hotel, not to mention the fact that we had to get materials onto a roof that was 270 feet from the ground.” 

Envisioning an Approach

The Whitco Roofing team also had to deal with challenging application conditions, given that the roof had many penetrations due to the presence of air conditioning units, towers, exhaust vents, lighting, walkways, ladders, staircases and other equipment. Special care would have to be given to the installation of the flashing to ensure no opportunities for leak formation remained after the roofing job was done. Recognizing that the use of a liquid flashing material was the best bet to keep the roofing layer monolithic despite all the penetrations, the Whitco Roofing team set about selecting the right compatible materials for the job.

SOPREMA’s SENTINEL P150 60-mil PVC-based roofing membrane was selected for the projectbecause we wanted a durable roofing product that was compatible with a liquid flashing material for difficult base flashings encountered during this project,” explains Henri Brickey, director of business development for Whitco Roofing. “We recommended the SOPREMA PVC membrane for several reasons, the first of which is the superior chemical and UV resistance PVC offers over TPO. Since we also intended to wrap the large quantity of concrete and metal support column bases with SOPREMA’s ALSAN RS 230 Flash polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) liquid resin, we made sure the PVC membrane was compatible and that we could include those areas under the roof’s warranty.” 

The Installation Commences

The complex coordination required for a successful roofing installation began on the ground. One week’s worth of material was staged at a time, then a crane was brought in to upload materials to the roof on the same day trash was being downloaded from the old roof tear-off process. All debris had to be carefully bagged and secured with tarps to avoid pollution in the nearby Savannah River, and the delivery and removal of four dumpsters at a time had to be carefully coordinated so that no dumpster was left on the premises overnight, blocking entry to the building. “You had to be out of there by five o’clock with everything, and it had to be done in a particular sequence, further complicating matters,” explains Hoffman.

On the rooftop, existing asphalt-based roofing materials were stripped down to the concrete deck. SOPREMA SOPRA-ISO3.5-inch polyisocyanurate insulation was adhered using SOPREMA DUOTACK 365 foam adhesive to provide improved R-value to the building. Next, the PVC membrane was bonded onto the insulation, providing both a reliable waterproofing layer and a reflective white finish that would help diminish heat absorption compared to the older materials. The liquid resin coating was then applied to prevent water intrusion at all exposed concrete column bases — extending up and coating metal base plates — and at vertical flashing points where air handling units tied into the building’s walls. New tapered crickets were also installed between drains, improving the overall flow of water on the roof and reducing the opportunity for ponding water.

Safety and Communications Prioritized

Throughout the project, OSHA guidelines had to be followed carefully on the rooftop and on the ground to ensure both workers and bystanders entering and exiting the hotel were safe. Flagging and ground guides were used around the staging area, and strict adherence to timelines for deliveries and mobilizations were also critical to the safe execution of the project. The Whitco Roofing team worked closely with the hotel management throughout the process to prevent interference with hotel operations and to minimize risks to guests. 

The building now benefits from a superior roofing membrane that is Energy Star-compliant, upgraded insulation, a strong foam adhesive that helps resist uplift pressure during storms and a monolithic waterproofing layer thanks to the liquid flashing installed around all penetrations. “SOPREMA’s single-ply membranes have a reputation for strength and durability,” notes Brickey, “and especially with the inclusion of the liquid flashing system to deal with difficult flashing details, we were able to provide a long-lasting, warranted waterproofing solution for the Westin.”

In all, more than 14,000 square feet of roofing material was replaced over the course of roughly a month by a large team of installers. In part because the hotel staff was so pleased with the way the job was planned, managed and executed, Whitco Roofing was brought back to install a new roof on a lower section of the building as well. That project was recently completed, positioning the Westin Savannah to resist the elements while serving as a relaxing getaway for the foreseeable future.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Whitco Roofing, Atlanta, Georgia, www.whitcoroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Membrane: SENTINEL P150 PVC, SOPREMA, www.soprema.us

Insulation: SOPRA-ISO, SOPREMA

Adhesive: DUOTACK 365, SOPREMA

Liquid Flashing: ALSAN RS 230 Flash, SOPREMA

Safety Tips and Best Practices for Roofing in Frosty Temperatures

Installing a roof in cold weather is nothing to sneeze at. While roofing contractors in the deep South may not have to worry about business slowing down in the winter, the majority of contractors must contend with cold temperatures, snow, ice and sleet. And even when these extreme weather conditions allow work to be done, they can still create many product and safety issues on the job. 

No matter how well you’ve honed your craft, roofing in cold weather is a challenge for any seasoned contractor. In addition to thinking about the safety of your workers, you must also consider the usability of supplies and equipment, which may be susceptible to the elements. 

For instance, in lower temperatures, certain types of asphalt shingles can become less flexible and equipment may freeze. Also, you should ask yourself: Can I keep my workers motivated and focused on the quality I expect? When roofers are uncomfortable or can’t work safely, they begin to worry about themselves more than the work they’re doing — and justifiably so. 

Before proceeding with your next cold-weather roofing job, consider the following precautions and recommendations. 

Product Considerations

The first rule of cold-weather roofing is to follow all manufacturers’ cold-weather installation guidelines. Different manufacturers specify different minimum temperatures for their products. If the temperature is below that minimum, you will need to take extra precautions to ensure the roof shingles are handled correctly and the product seals properly. 

For example, while asphalt shingles have been successfully used in cold climates for more than a century, they become less flexible at temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. 

When asphalt shingles lose their pliability, they become prone to cracking and other problems, including failing to lie flat and not holding their shape, which can result in granule loss, humping and other damage. Lower temperatures will also keep the shingle sealant lines from achieving proper thermal activation. 

Because of the increased risk of shingle damage and the shingle not sealing correctly in cold temperatures, workers should keep the following things in mind:

  • Never throw or drop shingles. 
  • Give shingles time to warm up before installation if they have been stored in freezing temperatures. Cold shingles — especially fiberglass shingles — may crack on the back when nailed to the deck, which can cause roof leaks. Best practice: When installing shingles in low temperatures, nail them by hand to avoid the “blow through” that a high-powered nail gun can cause.

Remember that most sealants won’t thermally activate at temperatures below 40 degrees. Instead, seal strips must be hand sealed with an approved asphalt roofing cement or other manufacturer-approved adhesive. 

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) recommends that shingles be pressed into the asphalt cement so that the adhesive reaches almost to the shingle edges, but is not exposed. For laminated shingles, ARMA says at least three spots of sealant may be used. If not sealed properly, eaves and rakes can be extremely susceptible to wind blow-off. 

The association also suggests the use of open metal valleys in cold weather because installing closed and woven valleys require shingles to be bent, which could result in damage. 

To prevent ice dams — the frozen water that can build up at the eaves of a roof — be sure to install proper roof and attic ventilation in addition to a premium ice and water roof underlayment, which provides a second layer of protection in cold-weather conditions. Ice and water underlayment can be used along eaves, valleys, flashings, hips, ridges, dormers, rakes, skylights and chimneys. Properly ventilating a roof will help ensure maximum protection against ice dams.

Before installing roofing underlayment, be sure that the deck is completely dry so the moisture doesn’t cause wrinkling or buckling of the underlayment. This wrinkling can telegraph through the shingles, creating cosmetic and performance concerns. In addition, trapped moisture can contribute to shingle blistering. 

Overall, when roofing during cold-weather months, check the forecast and plan for potential delays. Better yet, try to work on bright, clear days, when the sun can bear some of the burden and help warm up the roof deck. 

Safety Concerns

Near-freezing temperatures not only create issues with supplies, they can also pose safety risks to workers.

To avoid frostbite, roofers should layer up in clothing such as ClimaWarm and Hyperwarm, which provide warmth, breathability and protection from wintery weather. Even with the proper attire, workers should beware of the signs and symptoms of frostbite, which include prickling skin, numbness and — worst of all — clumsiness caused by stiff joints and muscles. 

In addition to following the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA’s) safety regulations for harnesses and fall-protection systems, roofers should always wear shoes with good traction — but especially in cold weather, when surfaces can become slippery. 

Also, encourage everyone to take regular warm-up breaks throughout the day, limit work schedules during extreme weather conditions and consider investing in on-site heating equipment, such as portable foot warmers.

To best prepare yourself and your crew for winter jobs:

  • Plan work around the shorter daylight hours, as well as weather conditions that may prevent roofers from safely being able to put in the necessary hours. 
  • Expect work performance to slow down due to dexterity issues and other natural body-responsive reactions caused by cold temperatures. 
  • Anticipate the extra time that will be required to clear snow from roofs and protect the surface from the elements while work is being performed. 
  • Remember that even a thin layer of snow can camouflage skylights, other materials and debris, which could pose a tripping or falling hazard. 
  • Because working in cold weather takes just as much, if not more, physical exertion as working in warm weather, roofers should be sure to drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration. 

Ultimately, the best advice is to be prepared. Take a cold hard look at the weather forecast and plan accordingly, taking into consideration worker safety, product usability and equipment functionality. Being flexible and ready to adjust work as needed can keep winter business from freezing up altogether.

About the author: Paul Casseri is the product manager of the Roofing Shingles and Underlayment Division for Atlas Roofing Corporation. For more information, visit www.atlasroofing.com.

New Visualizer Tool Assists Customers with Paving Projects

GAF has launched a visualizer tool to help sell its StreetBond Pavement coatings. Created by Chameleon Power, the leader in visualization technologies and GAF’s partner in roofing visualization tools, the StreetBond Visualizer assists customers with envisioning the outcome of their paving project prior to installation.

Users can select from a variety of different StreetBond coating colors and StreetPrint patterns, and apply to their own project photos or drawings. The tool also features a “Need Ideas?” button that gives the user some starting patterns and colors to help them in making design decisions. “GAF has utilized Chameleon technologies for nearly two decades, and continues to embrace our next generation tools and concepts,” said Dan Dempsey, President of Chameleon Power. “Visualization is a standard in the construction industry, and we are proud to partner with GAF to provide this experience to GAF customers.”

Chameleon Power visualizers shorten the design cycle and enhance customer satisfaction. Websites that utilize Chameleon visualizers enjoy increased user time of more than 3X and sales closure rates of more than 75 percent.

To view the GAF StreetBond Visualizer, visit https://streetbond.chameleonpower.com.

Three Shingle Installation Mistakes That Cause Major Problems

By following installation guidelines, contractors can produce a more professional-looking roof that will be far less likely to experience problems a year, two years, or even 10 years down the road.

A roof that isn’t installed precisely the way it was intended can be both unattractive and incapable of standing up to extreme weather conditions. On a laminate shingle roof, overlooking seemingly small details, such as shingle alignment and nailing, can lead to serious problems. Here are some of the most common details that, when improperly executed, can have negative consequences later in the installation or after completion of the roof:

  1. No Starter Shingles/Improper Alignment of Shingles at Eave and Rake

CORRECT: This photo shows the starter shingle being installed correctly. Proper alignment is crucial when installing the starter shingles. Photos: Atlas Roofing

The starter shingle’s two purposes are water protection and wind protection at the eave and rake. A starter shingle is used to seal with the field shingle at the first course along the eave and rake. This helps prevent wind and water from getting beneath the shingle in this critical location. The underlayment is a secondary water barrier if any moisture gets beneath the shingles.

Starter shingles are installed so they overhang the edge of the eaves slightly to allow for water runoff. Then a course of shingles is installed on top of the starter shingles, forming a front line of defense for blow-offs and water damage.

INCORRECT: When starter shingles are not installed, water channels can form where the shingles align across the first course. Photos: Atlas Roofing

When roofers don’t use starter shingles and install the first course of shingles directly onto the eave or rake, water channels can form where the shingles align across the first course. Moisture can then come into direct contact with the roof deck. Shingles farther up the roof are protected by the courses beneath them, which catch and divert any water that happens to drip between the edges. The first course of shingles needs the same defense from the elements.

Tip: Proper alignment is important when installing both the starter shingles and the first course of shingles. If the starter shingles are not secured correctly at the eave or rake, and the first course of shingles is not nailed down evenly across the top of the starter shingles, the roof may be at risk for wind and/or water damage.

Manufacturer’s guidelines for the proper overhang spacing at the drip edge or rake should be followed precisely. If the starter shingle overhangs the eave too much, a gust of strong wind may lift the shingles and cause a blow-off.

  1. Improper Nailing

The obvious purpose of proper nailing is to ensure that shingles stay in place and don’t cause leaks. Local building

INCORRECT: Nail heads should be flush with the top of the shingle. All three of the nails in this photo are incorrectly installed. The nail on the left is over-driven, the middle nail is at the wrong angle, and the one on the right is under-driven. Photos: Atlas Roofing

codes and manufacturers’ instructions give roofing contractors the directions they need to fasten the shingles properly to the roof deck. Guidelines specify the number of nails per shingle and where the nails should be placed.

In laminate shingles, the nailing zone is referred to as the “common bond” area of the shingle. The “common bond” area includes the double-layer portion of the shingle down to the exposure and constitutes the proper nailing area as identified in laminate shingle installation instructions. The “common bond” nailing area must be targeted correctly in order to obtain the proper wind performance as advertised by the shingle manufacturer. Properly

INCORRECT: The nailing area must be targeted correctly in order to obtain the proper wind performance. In this photo, nails are improperly placed both above and below the common bond area. Photos: Atlas Roofing

placed nails go through two layers of shingles – penetrating through the previous shingle course underneath – attaching them securely to the roof deck. Nails placed outside the common bond area can void the roof’s warranty and prevent asphalt shingles from performing as intended during extreme weather.

Tip: Pneumatic nail guns are popular among many roofers. The pressure on the gun should be set correctly before use. Nail heads should be flush with the top of the shingle. If the pressure is set too high, the gun will overdrive the shingle, causing it to sink into the mat. Too low, and nails will be under-driven, meaning they will stick out above the top of the shingle. Incorrect pressure can also cause nails to be driven in diagonally.

Wind and wind-driven rain can lift improperly nailed shingles and cause water damage to the roof and possibly blow-offs. Using either too many or not enough nails can weaken the shingle’s performance, which can also result in blow-offs.

Finally, roofers who prefer hammers should be skilled enough to drive nails consistently into shingles at the right angle, not over- or under-drive them.

  1. Improper Shingle Alignment

Roof shingles are intended to be precisely aligned, both vertically and horizontally. Roofers lay out each course of

INCORRECT: Proper alignment of the shingles is crucial. In this photo, the top shingle has been placed too high. Photos: Atlas Roofing

shingles in a staggered, stepped pattern (think of a brick wall). The shingle edges of one course must be offset from the shingles below. Edges lined up with each other would allow water to seep through to the roof deck.

INCORRECT: The shingle at the top of this photo has been placed too low. Photos: Atlas Roofing

Installing shingles too high or too low compared to the previous course can affect the exposure, which in turn would affect the aesthetics, wind performance and seal strength of the roof. An improperly aligned shingle course would be very noticeable and have a wavy appearance that is unattractive and amateurish.

Tip: Manufacturer’s instructions for proper shingle alignment are printed on the shingle wrapper.

Eliminating Problems Pays Big Dividends

Roofers who are careful to avoid these mistakes can avoid unintended problems after installation. Using a starter shingle at the eaves and rakes can ensure that the installation is off to a good start. Paying attention to proper nailing and nail placement within the common bond area on all courses all the way up to the ridge can optimize the roof’s performance against wind and rain. Finally, carefully aligning each course of shingles both vertically and horizontally will give the finished roof a professional appearance and help to improve the homeowner’s curb appeal.

Improved PV Kit Offers Easier Installation

S-5! releases PV Kit 2.0 EdgeGrab and PV Kit 2.0 MidGrab, offering solar panel installers significant improvements and easier installation.

Among the improvements to the new PV Kit 2.0:

  • Only one tool needed for installation
  • Preassembled components save time and money
  • Installs with module, reducing lay-out time
  • Single-piece EdgeGrab installs with ease
  • Versatile: same kit for most modules
  • Creates a 1-inch gap between modules, allowing load reduction per ASCE-7
  • Improved disk design works with all S-5! clamps and exposed-fastened brackets
  • UL 2703 Listed (Pending)

S-5! introduced the original direct-attachment solar panel system 11 years ago. By listening to customer feedback, S-5! has created PV Kit 2.0 to solve installer bottlenecks, while improving installation time. These enhancements make the PV Kit 2.0 the most cost-effective PV mounting solution for installers, design professionals and building owners.

For more information, visit www.S-5.com.

Moser Roofing Solutions, LLC Recognized for Donating Roofing Repairs to Mom’s House

Moser Roofing, a family owned business that provides award-winning installation and services to commercial properties in Lancaster, Lebanon, Dauphin, Berks, Bucks, Montgomery, and Chester counties, as well as the Mid-Atlantic states, recently contributed significant roofing repairs to the Queen Street facility of Mom’s House of Lancaster.

Mom’s House has served families across Lancaster County for over 27 years, specifically through offering child care services and educational and life skills support to single parents who desire to continue and complete their education.

Moser Roofing’s contribution allows Mom’s House to provide quality care to single parent families across Lancaster County move their families out of poverty and onto a path toward long-term economic stability.

“Mom’s House is honored to have the support of Moser Roofing. Their generosity fuels our mission and removes barriers to serve current and future families. We are so grateful to Moser Roofing Solutions, LLC!” said Sara Johns, Executive Director for Mom’s House.

“I want to personally thank you for the opportunity to serve you with in our community giveback program for roofing repairs.” said Josh Moser, President, Moser Roofing Solutions, LLC

For more information, visit www.moserroofingsolutions.com.

Fasteners Designed to Attach Sheeting over Rigid Insulation

Triangle Fastener Corporation expands their line of BLAZER Drill Screws with new sizes designed to attach metal panels over rigid insulation. These unique screws have two different threads with a gap in between that eliminates jacking of the panel during installation.

Features and benefits:

  • A special ¼-14 “high thread” under the screw’s head secures the metal panel tightly against the head for optimal seal
  • Unique unthreaded section eliminates the “jacking” of the panel during installation, improving the drilling and tapping performance
  • BLAZER 3 drill point for fast penetration with less effort
  • Lengths: 1-7/8-inch, 2-3/8-inch, 3-1/4-inch and 4-inch
  • TRI-SEAL 1,000-hours salt spray coating provides over 20-times more corrosion protection than screws with commercial zinc plated
  • Available with a zinc alloy cap or stainless steel cap providing corrosion resistance in harsh environments

For more information, visit www.trianglefastener.com.

Challenging Wintertime Installation Completed on Tight Schedule

Roofing work on the 250,000-square-foot expansion of Chicago Premium Outlets was completed in five months under challenging weather conditions. Photos: Johns Manville

The Chicago Premium Outlets 250,000-square-foot expansion includes 30 new or expanded stores, two new restaurants, 2,200 additional parking spaces, public art, outdoor fireplaces and a large pond. According to Mike Reynolds, senior project manager for Olsson Roofing Company Inc., headquartered in Aurora, Illinois, “Chicago Premium Outlets is more of a pedestrian mall since the expansion.”

Located approximately 40 minutes from downtown Chicago, the complex now features more than 170 stores including Adidas, Coach, Nike, kate spade new york, Movado Company Store, Saks Fifth Avenue Off 5th, Tommy Hilfiger, Vera Bradley, and Restoration Hardware. The reflecting pond is an inviting rest stop for shoppers, and it includes a play area and a pier-like pavilion with tables, chairs and umbrellas. To support the expansion, Olsson Roofing Company, the roofing contractor on the project, selected a TPO roofing system manufactured by Johns Manville.

A Challenging Installation

The project team faced two pressing challenges: weather and an aggressive timeline. The roofing-installation time frame fell between January and May, so the majority of the work needed to be completed during the coldest time of year. “We had our work cut out for us,” Reynolds says.

Photos: Johns Manville

The second challenge was the schedule. “The Olsson Roofing team worked several Saturdays and overtime to get the project finished as quickly as possible,” notes Reynolds. “We even heated the inside of the buildings to melt the snow on the roof and shoveled areas to make room for the product on the roof.”

Olsson Roofing chose to install the roof system using the RhinoBond induction welding attachment system from OMG Roofing Products. “We knew that RhinoBond would contribute to a successful installation of the TPO since we were dealing with below-freezing temperatures for most of the first 90 days,” Reynolds says.

Photos: Johns Manville

The 60-mil TPO was installed over two layers of ENRGY 3 roof insulation (one layer was 2 inches thick and the 2.5 inches). The majority of the roof surface features white TPO, but some EPDM was also used. “Olsson Roofing also used JM EPDM for the parapet walls since rubber is more flexible and quicker to install in cold weather and on vertical surfaces. They appreciated the ability to mix the systems and keep the project moving forward during cold-weather installation,” says JM sales representative Jason Conley. “With such a tight deadline, it was great to have the versatility of two excellent products — the durable 60-mil JM TPO and the flexibility of the JM EPDM, which provided just the right solution for our customer.”

TEAM

Architect/Specifier: FRCH Design Worldwide, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.frch.com
General Contractor: Graycor Inc., Oakbrook Terrace, Illionis, www.graycor.com
Roofing Contractor: Olsson Roofing Company Inc., Aurora, Illinois, www.olssonroofing.com

MATERIALS

Insulation: ENRGY 3, Johns Manville, www.JM.com
Membrane: 60-mil TPO in White, Tan and Light Grey, Johns Manville
Attachment System: RhinoBond, OMG Roofing Products, www.OMGroofing.com

NRCA Releases 2018 Manual Volume and Boxed Set

To provide the roofing industry with the most comprehensive and up-to-date information about the design, materials and installation techniques applicable to architectural sheet-metal components, the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) has released The NRCA Roofing Manual: Architectural Metal Flashing and Condensation and Air Leakage Control – 2018. The new volume updates the 2014 volume under the same title and serves as a reference for contractors, architects and roof consultants.

The manual contains information about the design, material and installation techniques applicable to architectural sheet-metal components and includes 60 construction details. In addition, background information is provided on moisture and air leakage issues in buildings such as ventilation for steep-slope roof assemblies and condensation control for low-slope roof systems.

The NRCA Roofing Manual: Architectural Metal Flashing and Condensation and Air Leakage Control – 2018 is best used with other volumes of The NRCA Roofing Manual: The NRCA Roofing Manual: Steep-slope Roof Systems – 2017, The NRCA Roofing Manual: Metal Panel and SPF Roof Systems – 2016; and The NRCA Roofing Manual: Membrane Roof Systems – 2015.

The 2018 volume and boxed set can be purchased in hardbound versions or downloaded for free in electronic format to NRCA members at shop.nrca.net.

Railing System Provides Temporary Fall Protection

The Finnish company Alupro announces the immediate availability of the Parapet Bridge for the temporary fall protection AluFix EVO.

In 2015, Alupro successfully introduced the temporary fall protection railing system AluFix EVO for highly secure roof work.

The new Parapet Bridge serves as an additional, outer safety railing, with which the temporary fall protection AluFix EVO can be extended quickly, easily and tool-free. The Parapet Bridge creates additional freedom of movement, because it increases the available working space beyond the parapet. Without having to set up a scaffolding from the outside, e.g. work on the parapet cover can be performed with the proven counterweight system AluFix EVO. The fall protection railing is flexibly applicable up to a parapet thickness of 730 mm and allows safe working on levels up to a roof pitch of 10 degrees. The Parapet Bridge consists of a sturdy, high-quality aluminum construction, which is mounted to a continuous safety railing. The secure connection points consist of self-locking clamping mechanisms that enable tool-free installation.

The system extension Parapet Bridge as well as the basic system AluFix EVO according to EN13374-A has been successfully tested and equipped with the GS mark for proved safety.

New features of the Attika bridge for AluFix EVO:

  • Fast, easy and tool-free installation
  • Lightweight and stable construction made of high quality aluminum components
  • Can be used on levels up to 10-degree roof pitch
  • Additional, enlarged working space for attic covers
  • Variable adjustment of the attic width up to 730 mm
  • Tested to EN-13374-A GS seal of approval for tested safety

Proven features (AluFix EVO):

  • Simple, tool-free installation
  • Lightweight, highly stable aluminum construction
  • GS tested, meets safety standard EN 13374-A

AluFix EVO can simply be supplemented by existing customers with the Parapet Bridge and can be used for all roof variants up to a 10-degree inclination.

For more information, visit www.alupro.com.