SFS intec Structural Fasteners Meet Code Requirements

SFS intec Impax and Flex5 self-drilling structural fasteners have received an evaluation report (ESR-3870) from ICC Evaluation Service (ICC-ES) , providing evidence that these carbon steel self-drilling structural fasteners meet code requirements. Specifically, the carbon steel Impax HWH, MAC, ZAC, cupped sealer, SD2 pancake clip and Flex5 products were included in the report.

Building officials, architects, contractors, specifiers, designers and others utilize ICC-ES Evaluation Reports to provide a basis for using or approving product in construction projects under the International Building Code and International Residential Code.

ICC-ES President Shahin Moinian explains why ICC-ES Evaluation Reports are so important. “SFS intec can now reference the evaluation report to ensure building officials and the building industry that the product meets I-Code requirements,” Moinian states. “Building departments have a long history of using evaluation reports, and ICC-ES operates as a technical resource with the highest quality of product review for the building department. Final approval of building products is always in the hands of the local regulatory agency.”

ICC-ES examined SFS intec’s product information, test reports, calculations, quality control methods and other factors to ensure the product is code-compliant. “We are very proud of the report,” says Andy Lee, product & key account manager, Roofing & Cladding. “It is a tool that will provide our customers confidence in obtaining code approvals.”

ARMA Helps Update Wind-resistance Standard for Asphalt Shingles

DURING THE past year, the Washington, D.C.-based Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has led the process to update the ASTM International wind-resistance standard for asphalt shingles to help ensure that it complies with the latest methods to determine design loads for roofs and cladding used on buildings. ASTM standards are consensus standards that are used around the world to improve product quality and build consumer confidence.

The 2016 version of ASTM D7158 is now coordinated with the American Society of Civil Engineers standard ASCE 7-10, “Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures”, which is the document that the International Building Code relies on for its structural provisions. The ASCE 7-10 standard had significant revisions in wind design. ARMA worked with recognized structural engineers who are leaders in the wind-engineering field and industry stakeholders who provided specific updates to D7158 that ensure consistency with ASCE 7-10. Although the building code includes conversion factors to account for differences between versions of ASCE 7, ARMA and other industry stakeholders recognized the value of correlating D7158 with the latest version of ASCE 7. The updates were balloted and approved via the ASTM consensus process.

“ARMA has always been a leader of progress and innovation in the roofing industry,” says Reed Hitchcock, executive vice president of ARMA. “Spearheading the revision of the test standard that determines wind resistance of asphalt shingles shows ARMA’s commitment to the roofing community, building owners and home-owners alike. We continue to strive to make asphalt the leading roofing technology.”

ASTM D7158-16, “Standard Test Method for Wind Resistance of Asphalt Singles (Uplift Forces/Uplift Resistance Method),” is now available for purchase on the ASTM website. Learn more about ARMA at AsphaltRoofing.org.

Green Span Profiles Receives Uplift Resistance Approval for Metal Roofing Panels

Green Span Profiles has received UL 580 Class 90 Approval for wind uplift for its RidgeLine insulated metal roofing panel.

UL 580 is the Standard for Tests for Uplift Resistance of Roof Assemblies. Roof assemblies are tested for their ability to resist both external and internal pressures associated with high velocity winds.

RidgeLine is a patented 2-3/8-inch tall mechanically seamed roofing panel covering 42 inches, with thickness options of 2.5, 3, 4, 5 and 6 inches. The core is a continuously poured-in-place, polyisocyanurate insulating foam. Exterior and interior metal panels are available in 26-, 24- and 22-gauge Galvalume steel. Exterior finish is standard gloss PVDF coating. RidgeLine panels can be used on slopes as low as 1/2:12 and are available in standard lengths measuring 12 to 53 feet, with custom lengths available on demand. Green Span Profile’s UL construction number is 698.

“This is great news for Green Span Profiles, our installers and their customers,” says Brian N. Jaks, P.E., vice president of sales and marketing at Green Span Profiles. “By meeting UL 580 Class 90, RidgeLine meets the standards of the International Building Code for installation in high velocity wind areas. UL certification adds another level of scrutiny to our manufacturing process. Underwriter’s Laboratories requires independent, quarterly QC audits to maintain certification.”

Attributes of RidgeLine:
· Single component installation
· Slides together; no rolling or lifting to engage the sidelap
· Continuous weathertight seal at the sidelap means no interruptions at the clips
· Factory-applied sealant in the batten cap
· Bi-directional mechanical seaming equipment
· Proprietary shoulder fastener, co-developed with Atlas Bolt & Screw, to prevent over-driving
· Nominal R-8 per inch of insulation thickness; R-20 for 2.5-inch panel

McElroy Metal Roof Panels Receives Compliance Evaluation

McElroy Metal receives a Uniform Evaluation Service (UES) Evaluation Report declaring the company’s Mirage Panel, PBU Panel and U Panel have all been evaluated for use as metal roof panels in compliance with Section 1507.4 of the International Building Code and Section R905.10 of the International Residential Code.

The structural, weather resistance and fire performance properties of these metal roof panels are evaluated for compliance with the IBC and IRC, when installed to the manufacturer’s published installation guidelines.

“Our customers require that we have our products evaluated to make their submittal process go smoother,” says Tommy Johnson, director of engineering for McElroy Metal. “The International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials Report (IAPMO) reports are trusted and depended upon by architects and building officials. They know when an IAPMO report has been issued on a product, that product has undergone the scrutiny of rigorous design and testing standards and is in compliance with the building code.”

The Evaluation Report is available on the McElroy Metal website at: http://www.mcelroymetal.com/news/uniform-evaluation-service-ues-report.html

Industrial Skylights With Capped System Meet Code Requirements

ICC-ES Evaluation Reports provide a basis for using or approving industrial skylights in construction projects.

ICC-ES Evaluation Reports provide a basis for using or approving industrial skylights in construction projects.

Using ICC-ES code compliant industrial skylights is an effective way to insure performance and rooftop safety for any roof or re-roofing project.
 
What sets an industrial skylight apart from other skylights? SKYCO Skylights believes using quality material and innovative designs when building natural lighting products is going to continue to set them apart from other manufacturers.
 
The skylight manufacturer commits to building its industrial skylights with a capped system, polycarbonate dome and proprietary wave design to ensure performance and durability. Capped industrial skylight systems are known for eliminating the common cracking that occurs in the domes of a capless system.
 
Code compliance for skylight manufacturers is an important accreditation to achieve. When specifying a skylight for construction or re-roofing it’s paramount for the architects and roofers/contractors to be sure they are using code compliant skylight models.
 
It is important that if the skylight is not a capped system then issues of code compliance come into play. Currently, there are no registered capless units that comply with ICC code requirements. In some cases, capless units have been misrepresented as ICC-ES listed when they in fact aren’t. A simple process to ensure compliance is requesting the ESR Number (SKYCO Skylights ESR is 3837) and conducting a google search. The skylight details should align with all the features listed to that number.
 
Industrial Skylights, manufactured by SKYCO Skylights have an evaluation report ESR#3837 from ICC Evaluation Service (ICC-ES), providing evidence that SKYCO Skylights industrial skylight, as a curb mounted, self-flashing and with a Vortex louvered curb, meets code requirements. Building officials, architects, contractors, specifiers, designers and others utilize ICC-ES Evaluation Reports to provide a basis for using or approving industrial skylights in construction projects under the International Building Code (IBC).

Self-flashing Skylights on Commercial Warehouses Are Beginning to Leak

Today, many commercial roofers are dealing with a large-scale problem—reinstalling and replacing leaky self-flashing skylights on commercial warehouses. I have seen firsthand how improper installation of self-flashing skylights has become a headache for commercial property owners.

many of the skylights installed on commercial warehouse properties in the western Sunbelt states were installed improperly because they were installed first and foremost as fall protection for the open floor in the roof during construction by the builder and not by the roofer.

Many of the self-flashing skylights installed on commercial warehouse properties in the western Sunbelt states were installed improperly because they were installed first and foremost as fall protection for the open floor in the roof during construction by the builder and not by the roofer.

Around the late 1970s and early 1980s, intermodal freight became a huge part of global distribution. To handle the increase in freight projects, warehouse construction exploded. The Port of Oakland, for instance, invested heavily in intermodal container transfer capabilities in the ’80s. In fact, the aggressive growth of intermodal freight distribution continued into the early 2000s.

The cheapest and easiest way for skylights to be installed on these warehouses was to use self-flashing skylights. The metal curb or L bracket attached to the bottom of the skylight was, in theory, supposed to be set on top of the built-up roofing material and then stripped in, sandwiching the flange between he roofing layers. The result would be roofing material, then skylight, then more roofing material over the flashing on the skylight.

Unfortunately, many of the skylights installed on commercial warehouse properties in the western Sunbelt states were installed improperly because they were installed first and foremost as fall protection for the open floor in the roof during construction by the builder and not by the roofer. Our teams have seen thousands of these original self-flashing skylight installations where self-flashing flanges are set directly on the plywood roof deck, below all the roofing materials.

Most of the original roofers didn’t budget in the time and money it took to pull the skylight assembly apart from the roof deck and re-install it the proper way. Nor did they wash the oils off the new metal from the galvanizing process or use asphalt primer to prep the steel flanges of the assembly and ensure the roofing asphalt would stick properly. Over the years, as the metal of the skylight flanges expanded and contracted and the built-up roof did the same, but at a different rate, the roofing system eventually separated from the skylight, leaving a self-flashing skylight that’s now turned into what we jokingly refer to as a “self-leaking skylight”. This is part of the reason why everyone thinks skylights always leak.

The best way we’ve found to install leak-free skylights on a commercial warehouse roof, especially when re- placing the self-flashing skylights on an existing building, is to use a curb-mounted skylight. A curb-mounted skylight fits like a shoebox lid over a new curb the roofing contractor fabricates as part of the installation. This curbed design eliminates the metal flange and offers waterproofing redundancy in critical areas of the installation, so water can’t get into the building at the skylight opening. Because the new skylight is installed on a curb, it’s also much easier to address any future issues with the skylight or to replace it down the road if necessary. This especially comes in handy when owners lease to new tenants. New building occupancy regulations mean skylights may be required by municipalities to be changed out for smoke vents to comply with fire codes.

If you’re dealing with one or more self-flashing skylight leaks, there are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Check if there is condensation on the inside of the skylight; a lot of skylights have a trough where condensation runoff will leak into the building.
  • Be sure to check the juncture where the skylight and the roof meet (the skylight base flashing), which can sometimes include up to 5 inches of mastic at the base flashing.
  • If the skylight has a frameless acrylic cap without a metal frame around the outside, check the acrylic dome for stress cracks. It is possible to replace some acrylic domes on some skylights but often the cost of an acrylic dome is roughly the same as the cost of a new skylight, and if you’re already considering installing a new roof with a 15- to 20-year warranty, it doesn’t make much sense to leave the “self-leaking skylight” frame in place. Replacing the skylights during the reroofing project is much more cost-effective than re- turning to replace skylights later. In addition, skylight technology is far better now than it was 15 or 20 years ago (think about today’s impact-resistant polycarbonate and better UV and fall protection).

Above all else, don’t let self-flashing skylights give you and your roofing business a bad name. Instead, address the issue with your commercial clients and educate them about the best choices for their skylights and how they can stay current with the International Building Code and municipal codes. You’ll be helping them protect one of their biggest assets by ensuring their skylights stay leak-free.

PHOTOS: Highland Commercial Roofing

Attic Ventilation in Accessory Structures

Construction Code Requirements for Proper Attic Ventilation Should Not Be Overlooked in Buildings That Don’t Contain Conditioned Space

The 2015 International Residential Code and International Building Code, published by the International Code Council, include requirements for attic ventilation to help manage temperature and moisture that could accumulate in attic spaces. Although the code requirements are understood to apply to habitable buildings, not everyone understands how the code addresses accessory structures, like workshops, storage buildings, detached garages and other buildings. What’s the answer? The code treats all attic spaces the same, whether the space below the attic is conditioned or not. (A conditioned space is a space that is heated and/or cooled.)

The 2015 International Residential Code and International Building Code include requirements for attic ventilation to help manage temperature and moisture that could accumulate in attic spaces. Although the code requirements are understood to apply to habitable buildings, not everyone understands the code also addresses accessory structures, like workshops, storage buildings, detached garages and other buildings.

The 2015 International Residential Code and International Building Code include requirements for attic ventilation to help manage temperature and moisture that could accumulate in attic spaces. Although the code requirements are understood to apply to habitable buildings, not everyone understands the code also addresses accessory structures, like workshops, storage buildings, detached garages and other buildings.


The administrative provisions of the IRC that set the scope for the code are found in Chapter 1. Section R101.2 and read:

    The provisions of the International Residential Code for One- and Two-family Dwellings shall apply to the construction, alteration, movement, enlargement, replacement, repair, equipment, use and occupancy, location, removal and demolition of detached one- and two-family dwellings and townhouses not more than three stories above grade plane in height with a separate means of egress and their accessory structures not more than three stories above grade plane in height.

Let’s clear up any confusion about the code. The ventilated attic requirements in the 2015 IRC include the following language in Section R806.1:

    Enclosed attics and enclosed rafter spaces formed where ceilings are applied directly to the underside of roof rafters shall have cross ventilation for each separate space by ventilating openings protected against the entrance of rain or snow.

An accessory structure is actually defined in the IRC:

    ACCESSORY STRUCTURE. A structure that is accessory to and incidental to that of the dwelling(s) and that is located on the same lot.

The IBC also includes attic ventilation requirements that are essentially the same as the IRC. Section 101.2 of the 2015 IBC contains this text:

    The provisions of this code shall apply to the construction, alteration, relocation, enlargement, replacement, repair, equipment, use and occupancy, location, maintenance, removal and demolition of every building or structure or any appurtenances connected or attached to such buildings or structures.

This requirement for ventilated at-tics in accessory structures in the IBC and IRC is mandatory unless the attic is part of the conditioned space and is sealed within the building envelope. Unvented, or sealed, attics allow any ducts located in the attic to be inside the conditioned space, which can have beneficial effects on energy efficiency. For accessory structures, which are typically unheated, that provision does not apply.

It’s important to note the codes do contain detailed requirements for the design and construction of sealed at-tics to reduce the chance of moisture accumulation in the attic. These requirements have been in the codes for a relatively short time and remain the subject of continued debate at ICC as advocates of sealed attics work to improve the code language in response to concerns about performance issues from the field.

Traditional construction methods for wood-framed buildings include ventilated attics (with insulation at the ceiling level) as a means of isolating the roof assembly from the heated and cooled space inside the building. Attic ventilation makes sense for a variety of reasons. Allowing outside air into the attic helps equalize the temperature of the attic with outdoor space. This equalization has several benefits, including lower roof deck and roof covering temperatures, which can extend the life of the deck and roof covering. However, it is not just temperature that can be equalized by a properly ventilated attic. Relative humidity differences can also be addressed by vented attics. Moisture from activity in dwelling units including single-family residences and other commercial occupancies can lead to humidity entering the attic space by diffusion or airflow. It is important to ensure moisture is removed or it can remain in the attic and lead to premature deterioration and decay of the structure and corrosion of metal components, including fasteners and connectors.

In northern climate zones, a ventilated attic can isolate heat flow escaping from the conditioned space and reduce the chance of uneven snow melt, ice dams, and icicle formation on the roof and eaves. Ice damming can lead to all kinds of moisture problems for roof assemblies; it is bad enough that roof assemblies have to deal with moisture coming from inside the attic, but ice damming can allow water to find its way into roof covering assemblies by interrupting the normal water-shedding process. For buildings with conditioned space, the attic can isolate the roof assembly from the heat source but only if there is sufficient ceiling insulation, properly installed over the top of the wall assemblies to form a continuous envelope. Failure to ensure continuity in the thermal envelope is a recipe for disaster in parts of the country where snow can accumulate on the roof.

Accessory buildings, like workshops, that occasionally may be heated with space heaters or other sources are less likely to have insulation to block heat flow to the roof, which can result in ice damming. Ventilating the attic can prevent this phenomenon.

Accessory buildings, like workshops, that occasionally may be heated with space heaters or other sources are less likely to have insulation to block heat flow to the roof, which can result in ice damming. Ventilating the attic can prevent this phenomenon.


For unheated buildings in the north, ice damming is less likely to occur, unless the structure is occasionally heated. Accessory buildings, like workshops, that might be heated from time to time with space heaters or other sources are less likely to have insulation to block heat flow to the roof. In these situations, a little heat can go a long way toward melting snow on the roof.

While the ice damming and related performance problems are a real concern even for accessory structures, it is the removal of humidity via convective airflow in the attic space that is the benefit of ventilated attics in accessory structures. We know that moisture will find its way into buildings. Providing a way for it to escape is a necessity, especially for enclosed areas like attics.

There are many types of accessory structures, and some will include conditioned space. Depending on the use of the structure, moisture accumulation within the building will vary. For residential dwelling units, building scientists understand the normal moisture drive arising from occupancy. Cooking, laundering and showering all contribute moisture to the interior environment.

The IRC and IBC include requirements for the net-free vent area of intake (lower) and exhaust (upper) vents and also require the vents be installed in accordance with the vent manufacturer’s installation instructions. The amount of required vent area is reduced when a balanced system is installed; most ventilation product manufacturers recommend a balance between intake and exhaust. The IRC recommends that balanced systems include intake vents with between 50 to 60 percent of the total vent area to reduce the chance of negative pressure in the attic system, which can draw conditioned air and moisture from conditioned space within the building. This is less of an issue for non-habitable spaces from an energy-efficiency perspective, but moisture accumulation is a concern in all structures.

PHOTOS: Lomanco Vents

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SPRI Revises Wind Design Standard Practice for Roofing Assemblies for Inclusion in the International Building Code

SPRI has revised ANSI/SPRI WD-1, Wind Design Standard Practice for Roofing Assemblies, to prepare the document for submission to and inclusion into the International Building Code (IBC). SPRI represents sheet membrane and component suppliers to the commercial roofing industry.

This Wind Design Standard Practice provides general building design considerations, as well as a methodology for selecting an appropriate roofing system assembly to meet the rooftop design wind uplift pressures calculated in accordance with ASCE 7, Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures.

“Revisions to ANSI/SPRI WD-1 include additional insulation fastening patterns, along with more detailed practical examples,” says Task Force Chairman Joe Malpezzi. “This Standard Practice is appropriate for non-ballasted Built-Up, Modified Bitumen, and Single-Ply roofing system assemblies installed over any type of roof deck.”

In addition, SPRI has revised and reaffirmed ANSI/SPRI RD-1, Performance Standard for Retrofit Drains, in compliance with ANSI’s five-year cycle requirements. This standard is a reference for those that design, specify or install retrofit roof drains designed for installation in existing drain plumbing on existing roofs.

“It is important to note that the RD-1 Standard addresses the design of retrofit primary drains,” says SPRI President Stan Choiniere. “Local codes may also require secondary or overflow drains. SPRI will also be revisiting this standard after upcoming code changes are released.”

For more information about these standards and to download a copy, visit SPRI’s Web site or contact the association.

AEP Span, ASC Building Products Granted IAPMO’s Uniform Evaluation Service Evaluation Report ER-0309

AEP Span and ASC Building Products have been granted IAPMO’s Uniform Evaluation Service (UES) Evaluation Report ER-0309 which demonstrates compliance to the 2012 and 2009 editions of the International Building Code (IBC) and the International Residential Code (IRC).

IAPMO’s UES program lowers the cost and increases the value to code officials of these reports by combining all of these recognitions in one concise report prepared by an internationally recognized product certification body.

The UES ER-0309 states the Single Skin Steel Roof and Wall Panels with Concealed Fasteners listed in the report satisfy the applicable code requirements which allow for the specification of AEP Span and ASC Building Products listed panels to architects, contractors, specifiers, and designers, and approval of installation by code officials. It also provides code officials with a concise summary of the products’ attributes and documentation of code compliance included in the report. The UES program is built upon IAPMO’s more than 70 years of experience in evaluating products for code compliance, and their evaluation services are ISO

Guide 65 Compliant by American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and meet the requirements of IBC/CBC Section 1703 for approval agencies.

ASC Profiles LLC is a subsidiary of BlueScope Steel and Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metals Corporation. ASC Profiles is an industry leading manufacturer of cold-formed steel building components since 1971. ASC Profiles consists of three distinct business divisions, each serving a different market segment within the industry. ASC Steel Deck delivers a high quality line of structural roof and floor deck that has been fully tested for the commercial construction market. AEP Span provides architecturally engineered panels for steel roof and siding products for the commercial and industrial markets. ASC Building Products offers high quality steel roof and wall panels for the residential, light commercial, and agricultural markets.

Wind Loading on Rooftop Equipment

I recently attended a continuing-education conference for civil/structural engineers that discussed changes in the 2012 International Building Code (IBC) and the referenced ASCE 7-10 “Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures”. During the seminar, the question was asked: “Who is responsible for the design of wind loading to rooftop equipment as defined in the IBC and Chapter 29 of ASCE 7-10?” The most accepted response was to add a section in the structural general notes that wind design on rooftop equipment is to be designed “by others”.

A structural engineer designed the metal support system and load transfer from the new HVAC unit down through the structure.

A structural engineer designed the metal support system and load transfer from the new
HVAC unit down through the structure.

The design requirements for wind loading on rooftop equipment have been included in previous editions of the IBC and ASCE 7, but significant changes have been included in ASCE 7-10. The increased attention is in part because of more severe wind events in recent years. While it is not the primary responsibility of the roofing consultant or contractor to evaluate the systems being placed on the roof, it is good to understand the code’s requirements for loading to rooftop equipment, how the load is determined and applied, and how the load is transferred to the building structure.

CODE REQUIREMENTS

The primary focus of the roofing professional in the IBC is concentrated on Chapter 15 (Roof Assemblies). While there are requirements in Chapter 15 addressing rooftop structures, these requirements, particularly in relation to wind loading, extend beyond Chapter 15. It is therefore imperative to be familiar with other sections of the code.

For instance, Section 1504 (Performance Requirements) refers the user multiple times to Chapter 16 (Structural Design) for wind-loading-design requirements. While roof manufacturers typically prequalify their systems based on various industry standards (ASTM, FM, ANSI, etc.), rooftop equipment supports are not typically prequalified because of the variability of placement and conditions. Similarly, new to this code cycle, Section 1509.7.1 includes the requirement for wind resistance for rooftop-mounted photovoltaic systems per Chapter 16 of the IBC. Other industries or trades have similar requirements. Section 301.15 of the 2012 International Mechanical Code and Section 301.10 of the 2012 Fuel and Gas Code require “equipment and supports that are exposed to wind shall be designed to resist the wind pressures in accordance with the IBC”.

Section 1609 of Chapter 16 (Wind Loads) applies to wind loading on every building or structure. Section 1609.1.1 provides two design options. The designer can use chapters 26 to 30 of ASCE 7-10 or Section 1609.6 of the IBC. Note however that Section 1609.6 is based on the design procedures used in Chapter 27 of ASCE 7-10, which does not address wind loading on rooftop equipment and thus is not applicable. Chapter 29 of ASCE 7-10 (Wind Loading on Other Structure and Building Appurtenances) contains the procedures used to determine wind loading on rooftop structures and equipment.

DETERMINING AND APPLYING WIND LOADING ON ROOFTOP EQUIPMENT

Properly specified ballasting blocks are designed and formed to better address the freeze/thaw cycle.

Properly specified ballasting blocks are designed and formed to better address the freeze/thaw cycle.


To determine wind loading on rooftop equipment, the first step is to identify the building Risk Category (formerly the Occupancy Category) and the building location. The Risk Category is determined from Section 1604.5 and Table 1604.5 of the IBC or Table 1.5-1 of ASCE 7-10. There are slight variations in the two codes but typically each will produce the same Risk Category.

The Risk Category and the location are then used to determine the design wind speed based on published wind-speed maps, available in Section 1609.3, figures 1609 A to C of the IBC, or Section 26.5.1, figures 26.5-1 A to C of ASCE 7-10. It can be difficult to read these maps to select the appropriate wind contour line, specifically along the East Coast. The Redwood City, Calif.-based Applied Technology Council (ATC), a non-profit that advances engineering applications for hazard mitigation, has digitized the maps providing a valuable resource for determining design wind speeds by GPS coordinates or the building’s address. Visit ATC’s wind-speed website. Note however that it is always advisable to cross check this design wind speed with the maps in the adopted code or with the local building authority.

PHOTOS: MIRO INDUSTRIES INC.

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