SOPREMA Joins the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association

The Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association announced that SOPREMA has joined the group as a manufacturing member.

“The addition of SOPREMA to the polyiso industry and the PIMA family reflects the continuing growth of polyiso as North America’s insulation product of choice,” says Jared Blum, president PIMA. “SOPREMA’s construction industry leadership role is well acknowledged, and the PIMA Board of Directors looks forward to the active involvement of the company.”

SOPREMA joins PIMA’s six manufacturing members: Atlas Roofing, Firestone Building Products, GAF, Hunter Panels, Johns Manville and Rmax.

SOPREMA is an international manufacturer specializing in the development and production of innovative products for waterproofing, insulation, soundproofing and vegetated solutions for the roofing, building envelope and civil engineering sectors. Founded in 1908 in Strasbourg, France, SOPREMA now operates in more than 90 countries.

With its first polyisocyanurate insulation plant in North America, SOPREMA will expand its presence in the construction market by offering complete roofing solutions to its clients, while managing all production phases.

“SOPREMA is proud to join PIMA and contribute to the energy performance of buildings and the reduction of greenhouse gases as a manufacturer of high-performance insulation boards,” says Richard Voyer, executive vice president and CEO of SOPREMA North America.

NRCA Aims to Increase Awareness During National Roofing Week

Roofs are one of the most important parts of our homes, schools and businesses. But they’re often ignored until in need of repair or replacement. During National Roofing Week, July 5-11, the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) aims to increase awareness about the importance of hiring professional roofing contractors and making informed decisions about maintaining or replacing any roof system.

“National Roofing Week is about raising the public’s awareness about not only how vital a roof is, but also the importance of professional roof installation and maintenance to ensure safe, long lasting roof systems,” says Bill Good, CEO of NRCA. “Professional roofing contractors raise the bar for quality roof system work, and National Roofing Week helps homeowners and business owners make educated decisions when choosing a roofing professional.”

In honor of National Roofing Week, NRCA and King of Texas Roofing (Dallas) hosted a community service project, replacing the roof of Momentous Institute, owned and operated by the Salesmanship Club of Dallas. Momentous Institute is a nationally acclaimed lab school that provides therapeutic services to children and families in need in the Dallas area.

NRCA manufacturer members RMax (Dallas) OMG Roofing Supplies (Agawam, Mass.), Johns Manville (Denver), H&E Equipment Services (Dallas), Roofing Supply Group (Dallas) and Jim Whitten Roof Consultants (Austin, Texas) donated materials and labor for the project.

King of Texas Roofing re-covered 26,000 square feet of the nearly 20-year-old roof with 1-inch polyiso insulation and a 60-mil, white thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) roof system. To celebrate National Roofing Week, NRCA is encouraging professional roofing contractors to participate in roofing or non-roofing related community service projects.

“In honor of National Roofing Week, we want to promote the good deeds of the roofing industry and emphasize the value of professional roofing contractors to the communities where they live and work,” says Good. “The best way to do that is through community service projects. We encourage all professional roofing contractors to engage with their communities and help in any way they can.”

During National Roofing Week, NRCA will recognize the winners of its annual Children’s Art Contest that was open to children in grades one through eight who are relatives of NRCA members and their employees. Contest winners will have their artwork featured on all 2015 National Roofing Week materials and displayed at industry events throughout the year.

Johns Manville Releases Sustainability Report

Johns Manville (JM), a global manufacturer of energy-efficient building products and engineered specialty materials and a Berkshire Hathaway company, released its 2014 Sustainability Report. The fourth annual report highlights significant accomplishments and initiatives tied to the economic, environmental, and social impacts of sustainability and is available on the company’s website.

“This report ties closely to JM’s four core values—people, passion, protection and performance—and focuses on the innovative approaches the company is taking to infuse sustainability into every aspect of our business,” says Mary Rhinehart, president and CEO. “We are pleased with the results and will continue looking for opportunities to improve and perform in a way that ultimately delivers even greater value to our customers.”

The report also incorporates a new feature—the JM Product Landscape—that highlights the sustainable attributes of many JM products used within a multitude of industries. Users can click on various locations within the landscape for specific product application and sustainability information.

“JM’s approach to sustainability continuously evolves as we balance the needs of our customers, employees and the environment,” says Tim Swales, vice president of research and development and chief sustainability officer. “Our greatest achievements in 2014 were in the areas of waste reduction, energy efficiency and community investment, thanks to a variety of programs and practices. We also identified opportunities for improvement, most notably in the area of greater alignment around our safety program.”

Significant accomplishments outlined in the 2014 report include:

  • Reducing waste by 11.5 percent since 2010 by implementing waste-saving programs across global operations.
  • Decreasing energy usage by more than 5 percent since 2010, despite increasing production.
  • Achieving goals for volunteerism by doubling the number of employee volunteers since 2011.
  • Increasing employee training hours by 30 percent in 2014 with a focus on leadership, management, compliance, language and technology.
  • Recognition from key industry organizations, including a SmartWay Excellence Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Voluntary Protection Program Star status from OSHA for 10 JM manufacturing facilities.

The report is divided into sections that reflect JM’s core values of people, passion, performance and protection. These values guide the company and its employees to be a leader in each of the global markets JM serves. These values also differentiate JM from its competition and make the company an employer of choice and a supplier of choice.

The 2014 publication marks the fourth year that JM has published a sustainability report detailing enterprise-wide sustainability initiatives. The report received a B-Level Application Level Check by the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) and includes 24 fully reported performance indicators applying the GRI 3.1 guidelines.

Product Series Allows Roofs to Be Customized

Johns Manville has debuted the DynaFast product series, developed from its first-generation ASTM D6164 DynaLastic platforms.

Johns Manville has debuted the DynaFast product series, developed from its first-generation ASTM D6164 DynaLastic platforms.


Johns Manville has debuted the DynaFast product series, developed from its first-generation ASTM D6164 DynaLastic platforms. DynaFast SBS modified bitumen membranes are designed to be mechanically fastened. Together, DynaFast 180 S, DynaFast 180 HW and the DynaFast250 HW provide a vast assortment of options to customize any commercial roofing job. The system requires fewer fasteners for the same wind-uplift rating as traditional system fastening and gives you the choice of fasteners. DynaFast may be used in high and low wind zones. There’s an application for every job, including hot, cold and heat-weld applications. Roll lengths of 1 square or 1 1/2 square with varied thicknesses mean faster installation.

Johns Manville Upgrades Its Nonwoven Glass Mat Production Plant

Johns Manville (JM), a global materials manufacturer and Berkshire Hathaway company, announced a significant upgrade to its nonwoven glass mat production plant in Waterville, Ohio. Beginning in late 2015, JM will upgrade an existing nonwoven mat line with advanced manufacturing technology that will allow the company to better serve customers in growing segments of the global specialty glass mat market. JM anticipates the upgraded production line will be fully operational in early 2016.

JM is a producer of specialty glass mat in North America and is an internationally recognized technology and quality leader. The company’s glass nonwoven products are used in a wide range of residential and commercial building as well as specialty industrial applications, including roofing shingles, carpet tile, vinyl flooring, office panels, ceiling tile, duct liner, exterior sheathing and energy storage.

In addition to providing strength and reinforcement, JM’s customers use specialty glass mat to support surface aesthetics, acoustical performance, mold and mildew resistance, and sustainability performance of end-use products.

“This investment positions JM for business in new and evolving markets,” says Enno Henze, senior vice president and general manager for JM Engineered Products. “For example, in the energy storage space, fuel economy standards are driving new battery technologies. Additionally, as a leading supplier of glass mat nonwovens to the European vinyl flooring industry, this upgrade allows us to support the domestic growth of vinyl flooring companies as they continue to ‘on-shore’ their manufacturing to the U.S.”

“Our upgraded Waterville plant will enable JM to provide global product capability between Europe and the Americas and to deliver global product consistency with regional availability,” says Tanya Bradby, portfolio leader, Nonwovens America. “JM has a 157-year history of building science and product innovation, and this investment represents our latest commitment to the future of the industries we serve.”

Last year, JM announced the merger of its Engineered Products divisions in America, Europe and Asia into one global business unit. The company’s investment in its Waterville manufacturing plant supports this reorganization and bolsters the company’s global manufacturing footprint. In addition to its Waterville plant, JM operates Engineered Products production facilities in China, Germany, Slovakia and in other areas of the U.S.

IRE: Johns Manville Sponsors The Roofing Institute, Houzz Debuts as an Exhibitor

Adding another important component to the already strong line-up of show floor activities and educational offerings, Johns Manville will sponsor The Roofing Institute at the 2015 International Roofing Expo (IRE), Feb. 24 to 26, 2015, at the Morial Convention Center in New Orleans.

Held on the show floor in booth No. 1217, The Roofing Institute curriculum is built around 10 condensed classes held on the show floor that provide roofing professionals with the knowledge to sharpen and hone their business acumen. Free with all registration packages, seating is available for up to 40 people on a first-come, first-served basis.

“We are always looking for innovative ways to make our education program even more meaningful and rich,” says Tracy Garcia, CEM, show director of the IRE. “These Business 101 classes will help attendees increase the effectiveness and productivity of their businesses.”

“Johns Manville is known for our quality and commitment to excellence with our products,” says Jennifer Ford-Smith, director of marketing and single-ply systems at Johns Manville. “We will offer the same level of quality to these educational sessions.”

Of the 10 classes offered in The Roofing Institute, four will be presented by Johns Manville, while the other six will be led by forward-thinking industry experts.

Beginning on Tuesday, Feb. 24, classes include “Show Me the Money!”, “Leadership For Business Owners, Managers & Supervisors!” and “Get Your Construction Business to Grow & Profit!”. Johns Manville will present “Adhesive Application Considerations.”

Classes on Wednesday, Feb. 25 include “Building Future Leaders: The Evolution of Construction Management Education”, “What it Takes to Provide Professional Service” and “The ACTS of Leadership”. Johns Manville will present “Best Practices for TPO and Rhino Bond Installations.”

Concluding on Thursday, Feb. 26, “New Installation Techniques from a Proven Membrane—JM EPDM” and “SeamFree PMMA—Liquid Applied Advantages” will be led by Johns Manville.

“We are confident attendees will find The Roofing Institute a great addition to the 2015 International Roofing Expo,” says Bill Good, executive vice president of NRCA, the show’s official sponsor. “I encourage our members to attend these free classes to gain knowledge and excel in their businesses.”

In other news, Houzz, an online platform for home remodeling and design, will debut as an exhibitor at IRE.

Houzz will be exhibiting in booth No. 2513 on the show floor in the Business & Technology Pavilion. Visitors to the Houzz booth will receive one-on-one training on how to use Houzz to showcase their work to the more than 25 million monthly users who visit Houzz looking for home professionals, including roofers, for their next project. Houzz experts will be on hand to set up free Houzz profiles and create free websites for IRE attendees.

In addition to exhibiting, Houzz will also present a session as part of the IRE conference program. Taking place on Tuesday, Feb. 24, from 1 to 2 p.m., “Maximizing Your Exposure to Local Homeowners with Houzz” will teach roofing professionals the best practices for using Houzz to build their online presence.

“Houzz is a great addition to the 2015 International Roofing Expo as their platform offers business and networking opportunities that will benefit our attendees,” Garcia says. “In addition, their presence will bring a greater recognition to the growing roofing segments available through Houzz.”

“We’re thrilled to have the opportunity to promote Houzz to a worldwide audience of roofing professionals,” says David Mayer, director of industry marketing at Houzz. “By exhibiting, we hope to educate roofing pros on how to use Houzz to gain exposure for their business.”

The International Roofing Expo will offer roofing contractors of all sizes and specialties a comprehensive preview of the entire roofing construction and maintenance industry. The show brings all segments of the roofing construction and maintenance industry together for three days of face-to-face interaction, product review, education and networking.

Online registration is available on the IRE website, where information is accessible 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Registering in advance will save attendees not only money, but also time by not having to wait in long on-site registration lines.

Projects: Education

University of Virginia, Rotunda, Charlottesville

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819.

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819.

TEAM

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: W.A. Lynch Roofing, Charlottesville
ARCHITECT: John G. Waite Associates, Albany, N.Y.
JOINT-VENTURE BUILDER: Christman-Gilbane, Reston, Va., ChristmanCo.com and GilbaneCo.com
LEAD-ABATEMENT CONTRACTOR: Special Renovations Inc., Chesterfield, Va.

ROOF MATERIALS

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper. W.A. Lynch Roofing sheared 4,000 individual tiles to approximate dimensions in its sheet-metal shop, and a makeshift sheet-metal shop was set up on top of the scaffolding to complete the final measurements and exact cuts.

COPPER SUPPLIER: N.B. Handy Co., Lynchburg, Va.
COPPER MANUFACTURER: Hussey Copper, Leetsdale, Pa.

ROOF REPORT

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819. Jefferson modeled his design—presented to the university board in 1821—after the Pantheon in Rome. Although he died in 1826 while the Rotunda was still under construction, the stunning building housed the university’s library as Jefferson envisioned.

The rotunda renovation is a two-phase project, and roofing work was part of Phase 1. The roofing team believed seven months was adequate to complete the job; the university, however, requested it be complete by April 2013 so scaffolding would be removed in time for the commencement ceremony. That gave the team a four-month timeline.

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper.

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper.

Tom McGraw, executive vice president of W.A. Lynch Roofing, explains: “This was just short of impossible even if it wasn’t winter. But as a graduate of UVA, I recognized the basis of the request and agreed to it. So we doubled the manpower and went to a 10-hour day, seven-day a week schedule. We divided the roof into four equal quadrants, each separated by an expansion joint and put a crew in each area working simultaneously with the other three. We also added support personnel in our sheet-metal shop, as well as runners to keep the flow of material to the job site on schedule for the sheet-metal mechanics. In the final analysis, we made the schedule and completed our work within the owner’s request.”

The roofing project was essential because of rust on the previous terne-coated metal roof. It was determined the rust was caused by inadequate roof ventilation that created condensation on the underside of the metal roofing. Ventilation was lacking because of a Guastavino tile dome that was installed in 1895. The condensation was addressed by installing a concealed venting system at the intersections of the treads and risers at the seven steps in the roof, as well as at the top of the dome below the oculus. “Heated air has low density so it will logically rise creating natural convection,” McGraw notes. “This convection creates air movement below the roof and minimizes dead air spaces and the potential for condensation. The key to this is ensuring that you size the ‘intake’ venting similar to the ‘exhaust’ venting so that air will flow in an unrestricted fashion.”

Reroofing a dome can be a challenge, and determining how to keep the interior and its priceless valuables dry required some ingenuity. McGraw invented a tarp that he compares to a hooped skirt to keep the space watertight. The roofing crew cut trapezoidal sections of EPDM membrane and installed them from the bottom to the top of the dome. This skirt-like tarp was configured out of eight pieces at the bottom, six at the midpoint and four at the top. The maximum cut sizes for each level were determined using a computer drawing. Creating the EPDM covering in sections made the tarp easy to handle and remove. “If we seamed it all together or made it in less pieces, the guys wouldn’t have been able to lift it,” McGraw adds.

The tear-off process involved removing the painted metal panels according to lead-abatement standards; the panels were cleaned offsite to maintain the integrity and safety of the job site. A new wood deck was installed on furring over the tiles. This was covered with 30-pound roofing felt and red rosin building paper followed by the new copper roof.

Each piece of copper was tinned and folded before being installed. This process was necessary because of the lack of symmetry on the building. McGraw recalls: “Because this building is almost 200-years old, you have to recognize that not everything is as true and square as one might hope. There are seven steps that circle the base of the dome, and each tread and riser changed in height and width all the way around the building.”

This is the fourth roof for the Rotunda. The first was a tin-plate roof designed by Thomas Jefferson; the second was copper that was a replacement roof after a fire in 1895; the third roof was painted terne-coated steel from 1976; and the current roof is 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper that will be painted white. The decision to select copper was based on cost, durability and historic appearance.

Phase 2 of the project began in May, and the Rotunda will be closed for repairs until 2016. At a price of $42.5 million, utility, fire protection and mechanical upgrades will be made, as well as a Dome Room ceiling replacement and construction of a new underground service vault. The roof also will be painted white, and leaking gutters will be repaired during this phase.

PHOTOS: DAN GROGAN PHOTOGRAPHY

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Fire Resistance Is Built into Polyiso’s Polymer

ENRGY 3.E from Johns Manville

ENRGY 3.E from Johns Manville

ENRGY 3.E from Johns Manville is the next generation of polyisocyanurate roof-board insulation whereby the fire resistance has been engineered into the polymer backbone without the need for added halogenated flame retardants. Unlike conventional halogenated flame retardants that are free un-bonded plasticizers mixed with the foam, the reactive polymer modifier used to produce ENRGY 3.E is a non-halogenated organo-phosphorus monomer that chemically reacts and bonds directly to the polymer network. This results in the polyiso performance attributes of the existing ENRGY 3 while being inherently fire-resistant and meeting all current fire codes.

Johns Manville Advises Customers of Revised LTTR Values

Johns Manville is advising customers of revised LTTR, or Long-Term Thermal Resistance, values for its polyisocyanurate insulation product line through a packet of information detailing the updated specifications. JM also has modified its packaging to reflect LTTR values by both test methods. As an example, a 1-inch board label will now include information from LTTR-S770-03: 6.0 (the old test method) and LTTR-S770-09: 5.7 (the new test method). To learn more and access an informational booklet, visit www. jm.com and click on the LTTR banner.