USGBC Launches New “Insight” Feature to Help Green Building Projects Prioritize Sustainability Strategies, Improve Performance

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) launched Insight, a new data-driven tool that highlights building project design features that can lead to better performance. Insight is available as a feature of the Arc platform and provides information on the design attributes of LEED certified buildings within a specified geographic region. Project teams can then compare and rank potential sustainability strategies to see how they stack up against the performance of other buildings. Insight leverages the depth of the existing LEED data to aid designers and builders in adopting smart, practical and achievable sustainability strategies.

“The Insight tool is all about partnership, innovation and green building performance,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, president and CEO, USGBC. “USGBC has a vision of a performance-oriented future and the trajectory of LEED is to continue to improve the performance throughout the lifecycle of buildings. Holistically, LEED enables the best possible buildings – and with tools like Insight, it will also allow building owners and city leaders to better track progress toward their environmental, social and governance (ESG) goals.”

Insight can be leveraged by LEED and green building teams to improve the design – and eventually performance – of their buildings by encouraging the implementation of best practices during the design and construction stage. Insight helps green building and LEED project teams identify practices that could improve building performance and eliminate those that pose a risk to their long-term investment. The new tool is part of USGBC’s continued efforts to leverage data and technology to encourage more informed decisions around sustainability.

Insight was created in partnership with Skanska – a project development and construction group – and also USGBC member company and longtime supporter of the green building movement. Experts from both organizations worked together over two years to develop the tool.

“Insight can compare your project team’s aspirations for energy, water and waste savings with results from similar buildings in your region, which allows you to visualize how the performance of your project stacks up to other buildings like yours and will help you make informed decisions about practical and achievable sustainability strategies,” said Beth Heider, FAIA, chief sustainability officer, Skanska USA. “Skanska is proud of this work alongside USGBC that provides design phase insight to the Arc platform.” 

The ability to consider the impact of strategies and decisions will help building teams be more effective in tracking sustainability performance and progress. Insight supports teams pursuing LEED certification, as well as projects that are already certified, but are committed to maintaining a high level of performance or seeking recertification.  

For more information, visit https://new.usgbc.org

USGBC Opens Call for Proposals for the Next Version of LEED

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)announced a call for proposals to solicit feedback and concepts for the next version of LEED. USGBC created the LEED green building program 20 years ago to measure and define green building and to provide a roadmap for developing sustainable buildings. LEED is updated through a continuous improvement process and with each new version USGBC is evolving LEED’s approach and challenging the building sector to be more resource efficient and sustainable.

In April 2019, USGBC officially released the complete suite of LEED v4.1 rating systems. LEED v4.1 emphasizes the human experience and pushes project teams to create spaces that not only reduce carbon emissions, energy, water use and waste, but also improve the health and well-being of the people who live, work, learn and play in these buildings, cities and communities every day.

“With LEED v4.1 we have fundamentally transformed our rating system development process,” said Mahesh Ramanujam, president and CEO, USGBC. “It has allowed us to become more agile and adaptable to incorporate real time feedback so that we can realistically raise the bar on the marketplace. We received an overwhelming response to our LEED v4.1 call for proposals, which has helped us to deliver on the market needs making LEED v4.1 successful and a market leader. Building on this success, we are excited to engage the market again to solicit ideas, proposals and feedback for improving LEED v4.1 and future versions of LEED. Together, we can continue the work we started with LEED v4.1 to ensure that LEED is not only the de facto leadership standard but also creating a better living standard.”

Cities around the world are mitigating climate risks by pledging to raise the bar to reduce carbon emissions. Investors are weighing their opportunities, consciously screening for projects that align with their values and prove winning ESG strategies. Building owners are pivoting focus to the occupants to reduce inequality, combat health concerns and deliver value to support the day-to-day needs of everyone and raise their living standard. The trajectory of LEED is to support these market changes by continuing to improve the performance throughout the lifecycle of buildings, advance net zero and net positive practices, and reward leaders based on their performance to enable building owners and city leaders to track progress toward environmental, social and governance (ESG) goals.

“There would be no LEED without the generous support of our members, advocates and stakeholders,” added Ramanujam. “I want to personally thank everyone who has supported us over the last 20 years and contributed to LEED’s development and growth. I am proud of what we’ve been able to do together this year with LEED v4.1, and I am excited and optimistic for what the future holds. I invite all members of the green building community to participate and help us define the vision for the next version of LEED as we work together to build a better future – because that future would not be possible without their leadership.

“Imagine a rating system adaptive and responsive to the ever-changing world around us. This is what we are working toward with LEED,” said Melissa Baker, senior vice president, LEED. “Now that LEED v4.1 is out and has been positively received by the community, we are exploring how we can strengthen LEED v4.1 and also plan what’s next for the rating system. We are working to ensure that LEED remains a global leadership standard, and we know that as we evolve LEED, industry feedback and support are critical.”

The USGBC community can participate in the call for LEED proposals session. Industry leaders can also join USGBC at the annual Greenbuild International Conference and Expo,  taking place in Atlanta November 19-22, 2019, for the “Future of LEED”  education session, which will review market feedback and provide updates on performance-based outcomes, transparency and continuous improvement to future versions of LEED.

For more information, visit https://new.usgbc.org/leed.

Environmental Product Declarations Are a Driving Force for Change

Agropur Cooperative’s new Canada Green Building Council certified and LEED accredited two-story office building in Longueuil, Quebec, has polyiso insulation on the roof. Photo: SOPREMA

With a worldwide population that continues to grow (estimated at more than nine billion by 2050), demand for natural resources is increasing at rates that threaten to stress sustainable supply. Over the last few decades, society has become increasingly concerned about the environmental impacts of human activity. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that the built environment accounts for 41 percent of our national energy consumption and nearly as much of our greenhouse gas emissions. With an eye toward conserving resources and mitigating climate change and its effects, the building industry is on the front lines of the effort to achieve sustainability goals and create buildings that not only drop jaws, but also lower carbon footprints.

Polyiso roof and wall insulation offers high unit R-value per inch, zero ozone depletion potential, and outstanding fire performance. In this photo, polyiso roof insulation is being installed on a flat roof. Photo: Hunter Panels

Sustainability is not a one-time event, but a process that encompasses the whole life cycle of a building. To effectively ensure that resource conservation spans that whole cycle requires transparency and coordination between stakeholders starting at the beginning of the design process to assess choices based on economy, durability, utility, and sustainability. Architects and specifiers need to have a complete picture of the merits of any product that might go into a building so they can make informed decisions that include impacts from a product’s manufacturing process to its long-term applied performance.

In the United States, the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards developed by the U.S. Green Building Council have emerged as an important benchmark for rating individual building components, processes, and systems. They are designed to:

  • Promote the efficient use of energy, water, and other resources.
  • Protect occupant health and improve productivity.
  • Reduce waste, pollution, and environmental degradation.
  • Improve resiliency in the face of extreme conditions.
The new Big Ten Headquarters in Rosemont, Illinois, utilizes polyiso wall insulation. Photo: Hunter Panels

Other notable programs across the globe and throughout North America, including the Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM), Green Globes, US Department of Energy’s Energy Star program, GreenStar, and the Living Building Challenge, employ standards that are used in concert with LEED ratings to boost performance and promote a conscious approach to resource use in building construction, operation, and maintenance.

Many manufacturers are publishing rigorous, third-party verified evaluations of the whole life cycle impacts of their products to increase transparency and allow easier comparison of alternatives. These Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) are similar to a “nutrition label” for building products and include information on sourcing, production, and performance of the products in a standardized and independently verified format that is recognized globally and based on International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standards. This consistent and scientific method to measuring and reporting information makes it possible to consider a product’s comprehensive impact and allows to base specification choices on measurable projections.

Earlier versions of LEED allowed manufactures to make claims about a product’s sustainability in one area without disclosing deficits in another area. This led to a healthy skepticism from clients and consumers about advertised merits and prompted a move toward greater transparency and verifiability. In its most recent revision, the LEED v4 standard asks manufacturers to provide more detailed information on a material’s content and its comprehensive environmental impact before their individual products can claim sustainability designations.

Basis for Evaluation

For an EPD to have a scientific basis, the impacts need to be clearly defined and linked to important environmental concerns. To help define these impacts the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed TRACI, the Tool for the Reduction and Assessment of Chemical and Other Environmental Impacts. TRACI methodology identifies a number of important factors related to critical environmental impacts:

  • Global Warming Potential (GWP)—linked to global climate change.
  • Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP)—related to the (now closing) hole in the earth’s ozone layer caused by certain chemicals.
  • Smog Creation Potential—linked to car exhausts, power plant emissions and fumes from products that contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs).
  • Acidification Potential—linked to acid rain caused by certain smokestack emissions.
  • Eutrophication Potential—linked to excessive amounts of nitrogen in rivers and lakes causing algae blooms that consume vital oxygen in the water.

Common Standards for Comparison

The EPD process is based on a framework to ensure that these practices are conducted in a consistent and reliable manner anywhere in the world. It includes the following key steps:

  • Product Category Rule – products with similar functions are assessed in the same way using comparable measures.
  • Life Cycle Assessment – products are evaluated based on inputs in the form of resources and energy, and outputs in the form of emissions and waste for their life cycle either from “cradle-to-gate” (from raw material extraction until it reaches the “gate” of the manufacturing facility) or the more rigorous “cradle-to-grave” (goes beyond the gate to include transportation, product manufacturing, use phase and the product’s end of life).
  • EPD generation – information from this assessment is organized into the standardized format for publication, including a life cycle diagram, illustration of product components, and a summary of impacts.
  • Third-party validation – outside experts verify and evaluate the report and the research that underlies it.

The widespread adoption of EPDs is fostering change in the building products industry leading to even more ambitious sustainability goals. As a growing body of EPDs are published, they contribute to a reliable catalog of data available as a reference point to help identify markets for new products and potential areas for improvement. Manufacturers can easily evaluate which steps in their products sourcing and production could be optimized for sustainability. Comparative information can serve as motivation for product innovation, leading to better options and better outcomes for the whole industry.

About the author: Marcin Pazera, Ph.D., is the Technical Director for Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA). He coordinates all technical-related activities at PIMA and serves as the primary technical liaison to organizations involved in the development of building standards. For more information, visit www.polyiso.org.

EPDs Confirm the Benefits of Polyiso

Photo: Johns Manville

EPDs from the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA) report the results of an exacting “cradle-to-grave” Life Cycle Assessment showing the merits of polyiso insulation for wall and roof applications. The findings include:

  • The energy savings potential of polyiso roof and wall insulation over a typical 60-year building life span is equal to up to 47 times the initial energy required to produce, transport, install, maintain, and eventually remove and dispose of the insulation.
  • Polyiso has a high return on embodied energy.
  • Polyiso roof and wall insulation offers high unit R-value per inch, zero ozone depletion potential, recycled content, opportunity for reuse, and outstanding fire performance.
Photo: Johns Manville

Evaluation for the third-party assessment was done by PE International and includes a cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment that covers every step in the process of creating and using polyiso products. Looking at everything from resourcing, production, transport, installation, maintenance, to eventual removal and replacement, the EPD measures impacts across a broad spectrum, including everything from how products might contribute to global warming, smog production, and ozone depletion to the energy and water use and waste disposal required at the end of its life.

Primary data from six PIMA manufacturer members was used for the underlying life cycle assessment and the EPD represents the combined weighted average production for these members.

What Is Polyiso?

Polyiso is a closed-cell, rigid foam board insulation consisting of a foam core sandwiched between two facers. In wall applications its facers, which are usually made of kraft paper-backed foil, are adhered to both sides of the foam before it is cut into sheets and packaged for shipment and the boards function both as continuous insulation—creating a thermal barrier that isn’t interrupted at every stud—and as an environmental envelope to protect the building from water, air, and heat infiltration. It is typically attached outside the wall framing and covered by an exterior finish.

It is the most widely used insulating material for above-deck commercial roof construction in North America. The boards are installed in one or more layers, depending on the insulation needs, on the steel, wood, or concrete roof deck structure and then covered with the roofing membrane.

EPD Polyiso Findings

  • High thermal efficiency. Because it is one of the most thermally efficient building insulations available in today’s marketplace, Polyiso requires less total thickness to deliver specified R-value in roof and wall assemblies, reducing overall construction costs and increasing usable building space.
  • High net return on embodied energy. A recent study comparing initial embodied energy to long-term energy savings achieved over 60 years in a typical commercial building suggests that the net energy savings potential of Polyiso wall insulation ranges between 20 and 47 times the initial embodied energy required to produce, transport, and install the Polyiso insulation.
  • Zero ozone depletion potential. All PIMA Polyiso manufacturer members produce rigid foam board with third-generation, zero ozone-depleting blowing agents. The blowing agent (pentane) used in Polyiso also is among the lowest in Global Warming Potential.
  • Recycled content. Polyiso insulation typically is manufactured using recycled material. The percentage of the recycled material by weight depends on the individual manufacturer, the thickness of the product, and the type of facer.
  • Opportunity for reuse. Although this declaration assumes the Polyiso wall insulation boards will be landfilled at the end of the wall assembly service life, it is possible to salvage and reuse the boards, either at the original site or on another construction site. Used Polyiso wall insulation may be collected and resold by several national logistics firms.

PIMA is currently updating its EPDs for polyiso wall and roof insulations, which will be available in Q1 of 2020.

Structural Acoustical Roof Decks Reduce Noise, Provide R-Values Up to 44

Tectum Structural Acoustical Roof Deck solutions from Armstrong Building Solutions provide predictable noise absorption, durability, and sustainability to meet building design needs. Composite roof deck options provide R-values up to 44. By providing noise absorption up to 0.80, the panels often eliminate the need for additional acoustical treatments, providing faster and easier installations than standard steel roof decks.  

According to the manufacturer, Tectum Roof Decks are an ideal noise reduction solution for large, high traffic, exposed structure spaces such as auditoriums, gymnasiums, arenas, pools, ice arenas and multi-use facilities. Tectum Roof Deck panels also help meet ANSI S12.60 Acoustical Performance Criteria for learning spaces such as gymnasiums.  

Tectum Roof Decks are composed of rapidly renewable and FSC-certified aspen wood fiber that is bonded with an inorganic hydraulic cement for maximum durability and performance. Tectum 1 (non-composite panels) meet the most stringent sustainability criteria, including EPD, HPD, and Declare, and contribute favorably to LEED v4, and the Living Building Challenge.

Tectum Roof Deck solutions in plank or tile configurations are available in a wide variety of system configurations to address a building’s design requirements in low-slope applications and are compatible with virtually all roofing materials, providing a thermal barrier for field-applied foam plastics.

Tectum Composite Roof Deck panels are typically used in sloped applications where acoustics, insulation, a nailable surface, and structural integrity are all important. An NRC up to 0.80 provides predictable acoustics, often eliminating the need for additional noise reducing materials.

LEARN MORE

Visit: www.armstrongbuildingsolutions.com

Call: (877) 276-7876

Curved and Tapered Zinc Panels Highlight Canadian Subway Entrance Pavilion

The Vaughan Metropolitan Centre Subway Station is one of six new subway facilities near Toronto. Photos: Rheinzink

The new Vaughan Metropolitan Centre Subway Stationis truly an artistic jewel on Toronto Transit Commission’s (TTC) Spadina Subway Extension. One of six new facilities on the route, the station offers intermodal transit services and rapid subway connection to downtown Toronto.

The curvilinear design of the main entrance pavilion creates a futuristic appearance for the structure. The design offers a column-free interior environment with high ceilings and bright open spaces that allow daylight to penetrate deeply into the station.

Highlighting the exterior design is a standing seam roof that brings the structure to life. Approximately 12,000 square feet of Rheinzink Classic bright rolledpanels clad the curved roof of the impressive building. The roof offers high solar reflectance and combines with significant sustainable initiatives throughout the project. The station exceeds Canada’s National Energy Code requirements for energy performance by 40 percent and meets sustainability standards comparable to those required for LEED Silver certification.

Approximately 12,000 square feet of zinc panels clad the curved roof of the station, which exceeds Canada’s National Energy Code requirements for energy performance by 40 percent. Photos: Rheinzink

More than 1,000 uniquely tapered panels were fabricated by Rheinzink distributor Agway Metals Inc. at its facility in Exeter, Ontario. “No two panels are alike,” says Paul MacGregor, estimator. “Each panel had an individual taper and length. We fabricated the panels using our CNC turret, which was key to achieving the exact taper for each panel right down to the millimeter.”

Providing precise panel specifications to Agway Metals was the installer, Bothwell-Accurate, of Mississauga, Ontario. It was a demanding process, according to Trevor McGrath, Bothwell’s estimating manager for cladding. “We used a 3-D scanner on the roof structure and then utilized Radius TrackCorporation to design the curved framing system that went on top of the roof structure,” McGrath notes. “The Rheinzink panels were thenapplied on that. Radius Track confirmed the skin model of the 3-D structure for us and then computer-flattened it so that we could begin doing sheet design and layout. The flattened model gave us critical dimensions regarding panel lengths and widths.”

The panels were curved on site by Bothwell-Accurate using Agway’s Schlebach machine. “We did a sheet stagger at the beginning of the installation with the two panel lengths, which then allowed us to stagger all of the joints which is recommended,” McGrath says.

Bothwell-Accurate has considerable experience in installing zinc.“We’re very familiar with how to form and work with the natural metal,” McGrath states. “The architects wanted an ‘old school’ appearance with hammered seams and the manner in which the flashings and counter-flashings were done. There was a painstaking amount of detailing done around the 46 skylights in the roof. Each one required custom attention. We had productions crews on the job getting the panels down and then finishing crews crafting the detail work.”

The curvilinear design of the main entrance is capped with a standing seam roof comprised of zinc panels from Rheinzink. Photos: Rheinzink

Design for the station was a collaboration of Grimshaw Architectsand Adamson Associates Architectsin conjunction with ARUP Canada.

Goals of the Vaughan Metropolitan Centre included encouraging greater use of public transportation, facilitating efficient transfers between modes of transportation, as well as creating an interesting aesthetic experience. The domed entrance pavilion integrates a mirrored ceiling art installation by Paul Raff Studio designed tocapture the drama of moving passengers and changing light conditions.

Juan Porral, partner at Grimshaw Architects, summed it up this way: “We are always looking for opportunity to create high-quality places with real character. By elevating a functional building to something artful and full of life that people will remember and enjoy, we can have a greater impact on urban space and user experience.”

GreenSlope’s New and Improved Formula Provides an Environmentally Friendly Solution to Ponding Water

GreenSlope is a roof leveling compound that helps eliminate ponding water on flat rooftops by filling in low areas, returning the roof to its original slope to achieve positive water flow to desired drainage areas. Following advanced in-house innovation and successful market testing, GreenSlope has been re-engineered for 2018 and now ships with a new and improved formula.

GreenSlope’s new formula features an improved adhesive, dramatically shortening the curation period from 24 hours to 2 hours, which allows for same-day topcoating. GreenSlope has also upgraded to finer-grade EPDM granules, which are less porous, easier to work with, and offer superior UV resistance and longevity. GreenSlope’s robust adhesive forms an exceptional bond with a wide variety of roof systems including single-ply, modified bitumen/BUR, metal and foam roof systems. The cured material is similar to a professional running track or premium playground surface, able to withstand extreme climates and as well as foot traffic.

At 20 percent the weight of concrete alternatives and half the weight of ponding water, GreenSlope reduces stress on the roof system by facilitating proper water drainage to extend the lifespan of the roof at a fraction of the time and cost it takes to install a new drain or tapered insulation. GreenSlope’s UV-stable compound can endure frequent freeze/thaw cycles and resists wear and tear while remaining flexible to absorb surface stresses. Highly malleable, GreenSlope can be used in a wide variety of practical scenarios including around low drains and scuppers, as walk pads and pitch-pan filler, for protection around curbs, HVAC units and more.

The product can be easily applied over low areas using a trowel and straightedge to smooth and level. For best results, additional topcoat application is recommended to achieve reliable waterproofing and match the aesthetics of the existing roof. GreenSlope is compatible with most topcoats including white acrylic, aluminum mastic, modified mastic, elastomerics, emulsions, and membranes.

The problem of ponding water offers service divisions an opportunity to open new doors with prospective clients. Ponding water can be found on eight out of 10 flat roofs and is one of the most commonly reported concerns of contractors and building owners as it can cause leaks, structural damage, membrane damage, algae and mold growth, slip hazards, insect problems, voided warranties, and premature failure of roof systems. Conventional options to deal with ponding include installing a new inner drain or adding tapered insulation, but these options are often expensive for building owners and not always necessary. GreenSlope’s preventative approach helps building owners maintain their roof asset while maximizing rooftop ROI. Additionally, going green offers potential LEED credits.

GreenSlope is manufactured and distributed by United Asphalt.

LEARN MORE

Visit: https://greenslope.co/
Call: (877) 356-9301
Email: team@greenslope.net

The “Roofers’ Choice” winner is determined by the product that receives the most reader inquiries from the “Materials & Gadgets” section in a previous issue. This product received the most inquiries from our September/October 2017 issue.

Metal Roof and Wall Panels Provide Industrial Aesthetic to Texas Ranch

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

As many architects can attest, designing a residence for oneself can present challenges. But architect Jack Carson rose to the occasion by creating a striking design for his new home, located on a ranch in the beautiful Texas Hill Country. Design for the 7,000-square-foot residence follows LEED principles and blends a unique palette of “industrial” materials with ultra-modern aesthetics.

“The house is truly on a ranch. We have cattle on the property,” says Carson, president of Carson Design Associates in Austin, Texas. “We wanted to keep the design somewhat in the ranch vernacular but with a contemporary look. The reliance on metal for the roof and cladding and an exposed structure helped create a ranch building feel. We like to think of it as an ‘industrial ranch’ aesthetic.”

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

Several of Petersen Aluminum’s PAC-CLAD profiles contributed to Carson’s success in delivering the desired look. Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof. The 16-inch roof panels were rollformed onsite because of extremely tight site conditions and because the only access to the site was via a dirt road that wasn’t wide enough to allow large trucks to deliver factory-formed panels. An additional 3,000 square feet of Snap-Clad panels also was installed vertically as siding around two garages and at specific locations on the house as accent panels.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed. All wall panels were manufactured at Petersen’s Tyler, Texas, plant.

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The onsite fabrication of the roof panels and the installation of all roof and wall panels was performed by Dean Contracting Co., Kyle, Texas. “The greatest challenge was executing the architects dream for his home,” recalls Jesse Brown, vice president of Dean Contracting. “The design included a myriad of varying geometric shapes on many different planes and a blend of materials that required complex detailing. It was probably one of the top-five most challenging jobs that we have ever done.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass. “We have great views into the valley with no neighbors,” Carson adds. “A large overhanging soffit covers a large portion of the deck and shades all of the glass.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.” Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit. Petersen functioned as distributor of the Reynobond ACM.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

The decision to use Petersen for the roof and siding was arrived at rather easily. Carson notes: “I was familiar with PAC-CLAD and wanted to use it but also wanted to rely on the builder’s recommendations regarding materials and subcontractors. In our very first meeting with the roofer, Dean Contracting, they brought in samples of PAC-CLAD and recommended using it. That made the decision pretty easy.”

Carson is a big believer in metal as a roofing and cladding material. “We wanted to be as maintenance-free as possible. And sustainability was an important component as well,” Carson says. “We used LEED principles in our design. Metal is far greener than asphalt shingles and other alternatives. It’s just a great option for residential construction.”

The installation went smoothly, Carson adds, primarily because he relied on the expertise of Dean Contracting. “My approach is to listen to the experts. Jesse Brown and his crew worked out the complex detailing. They use metal all the time and are extremely capable. We collaborated as necessary but I basically left it in their hands.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

Brown was quick to give full credit to the crew that was led by Juan Rojas, sheet-metal superintendent. Rojas is a 24-year employee of Dean Contracting and Brown cites Rojas’ attention to function and precise detailing as a main reason why the job turned out so well.

The house—in spite of its size and location in the hot Texas climate and the large amount of glass—is energy efficient. Two inches of rigid insulation was installed under the metal roof and an additional 4 inches of sprayed insulation went under the roof deck. “The heavy insulation and the shade provided by the overhang makes it very energy efficient. The house stays a very constant temperature,” Carson says.

The entire property captures rainwater in 18,000-gallon collection tanks, which is yet another reason for using metal, Carson points out.

When asked about the challenge of designing for yourself, Carson thought it was easier than designing for a traditional client. “I was probably more demanding in ‘getting it right’, but once I knew I had the right design and materials, I didn’t have to convince myself that it was the best direction. There was no negotiation or comprising the design in any way,” Carson says. “The biggest problem any architect has in designing for themselves is in ‘editing out.’ We know all of the possibilities, and being able to prioritize and filter out the unnecessary options is often the hardest challenge.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

ATAS National Sales Manager Receives Award

Mark Bus, national sales manager of ATAS International, received a Metal Construction Association Triumph Award at METALCON in Baltimore.  He was recognized as being someone who demonstrates excellence, creativity and initiative in his or her business or profession.
 
Jim Bush, vice president of Sales and Marketing states, “I have had the pleasure of watching Mark mature over the years to a young and emerging professional; not only within ATAS but also in the industry.  He has earned the respect of the ATAS sales team, as well as peers and management, through hard work and a sound decision making process.  Mark is also aware of industry initiatives and association activities and brings those into daily communications with staff and customers.”
 
An ATAS distributor, Allan Brock of Brock Associates, says, “During my forty year tenure in the commercial metal roofing and siding industry, I have rarely crossed paths with a young professional like Mark Bus.  I have seen Mark evolve from an inside technical sales person, to a regional product representative, to management.  At each level, he radiated professionalism along with product and technical knowledge.  It’s been a pleasure dealing with an individual as capable as Mark.”
 
Robert J. Bailey, AIA, CSI, CCS, LEED AP, specifications and constructability specialist with IKM Inc., also recommended Mark Bus for this award.  “Mark makes it a point to understand the people who are specifying and purchasing ATAS products.  As a new product rep in western Pennsylvania, he became involved in various CSI (Construction Specifications Institute) chapters.  It was clear to me that Mark knew in order to be prepared for a leadership role in ATAS, he first needed to understand the industry itself and establish important contacts and relationships there.  Mark is an example for other young sales professionals.”

Kemper System Is Developing Product Declarations to Meet LEED Requirements

To satisfy new LEED certification requirements for green building construction, Kemper System America Inc. is developing both Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) and Health Product Declarations (HPDs) for liquid-applied roofing and waterproofing products.

The latest version of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system, LEED v4, includes two new transparency elements for Building Product Disclosure and Optimization which can contribute up to four points towards a certification:

  • “Environmental Product Declarations” credits require the use of materials that meet EPD or similar disclosure criteria.
  • “Health Product Declarations” accrue “Material Ingredients Credits” for products that use designated methods to disclose composition to at least 0.1 percent.

To help customers obtain these new LEED certification points, Kemper System is planning to develop EPDs for products beginning in 2017 and issue upon completion; and to issue HPDs for all relevant products by the end of 2017.

Since the LEED rating system was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council in 1994, it has become a standard in green building certification, and it has adapted to meet the demands of building owners and regulators for transparency and sustainability.

GBRI Courses Assist Building Professionals Earn USGBC LEED Credential

The new LEED v4 Exam Preparation Package from education leaders GBRI (Green Building Research Institute) is an innovative way for green building professionals, architects and engineers to earn their LEED credential, signifying their in-depth knowledge of the LEED rating system, building codes and standards. The GBRI approach to LEED education allows green building professionals to earn their USGBC LEED Credential quickly and easily: using the live online, in-person and online on-demand learning modules, professionals can achieve their LEED credential in as little as four weeks. “Having worked in the field ourselves for decades, we get it. It’s no easy task to make time for exam preparation: professionals today need the online, on-demand and in-person flexibility that our courses offer,” commented Kayla Gerstenberg, director of education.

There is no pre-requisite necessary to take the LEED exam; the all-inclusive LEED v4 Exam Preparation Package includes everything professionals need to study for and pass the exam successfully. The package includes a study guide, online learning modules, and comprehensive practice exams with over 500 test questions (and explanations for each question). Offered online, online on-demand, and in-person, the course caters to many different learning styles and time schedules. Materials such as MP3 audio files, flash cards designed for studying on-the-go and memory charts are made available to aid the learning process. As GBRI boasts a large network of highly qualified instructors, courses are offered at locations throughout the United States and the world – from Vermont to Dubai.

Professionals can select from numerous specialties within the LEED credential: LEED Green Associate (GA), LEED AP Building Design + Construction (BD + C) and LEED AP Operations + Maintenance (O+M). Courses start at $199, and once signed up, students gain instant access so they can begin working toward their LEED credential immediately. To register or access more information about the online and on-demand online package, click here.