Metal Roof and Wall Panels Provide Industrial Aesthetic to Texas Ranch

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

As many architects can attest, designing a residence for oneself can present challenges. But architect Jack Carson rose to the occasion by creating a striking design for his new home, located on a ranch in the beautiful Texas Hill Country. Design for the 7,000-square-foot residence follows LEED principles and blends a unique palette of “industrial” materials with ultra-modern aesthetics.

“The house is truly on a ranch. We have cattle on the property,” says Carson, president of Carson Design Associates in Austin, Texas. “We wanted to keep the design somewhat in the ranch vernacular but with a contemporary look. The reliance on metal for the roof and cladding and an exposed structure helped create a ranch building feel. We like to think of it as an ‘industrial ranch’ aesthetic.”

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

Several of Petersen Aluminum’s PAC-CLAD profiles contributed to Carson’s success in delivering the desired look. Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof. The 16-inch roof panels were rollformed onsite because of extremely tight site conditions and because the only access to the site was via a dirt road that wasn’t wide enough to allow large trucks to deliver factory-formed panels. An additional 3,000 square feet of Snap-Clad panels also was installed vertically as siding around two garages and at specific locations on the house as accent panels.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed. All wall panels were manufactured at Petersen’s Tyler, Texas, plant.

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The onsite fabrication of the roof panels and the installation of all roof and wall panels was performed by Dean Contracting Co., Kyle, Texas. “The greatest challenge was executing the architects dream for his home,” recalls Jesse Brown, vice president of Dean Contracting. “The design included a myriad of varying geometric shapes on many different planes and a blend of materials that required complex detailing. It was probably one of the top-five most challenging jobs that we have ever done.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass. “We have great views into the valley with no neighbors,” Carson adds. “A large overhanging soffit covers a large portion of the deck and shades all of the glass.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.” Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit. Petersen functioned as distributor of the Reynobond ACM.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

The decision to use Petersen for the roof and siding was arrived at rather easily. Carson notes: “I was familiar with PAC-CLAD and wanted to use it but also wanted to rely on the builder’s recommendations regarding materials and subcontractors. In our very first meeting with the roofer, Dean Contracting, they brought in samples of PAC-CLAD and recommended using it. That made the decision pretty easy.”

Carson is a big believer in metal as a roofing and cladding material. “We wanted to be as maintenance-free as possible. And sustainability was an important component as well,” Carson says. “We used LEED principles in our design. Metal is far greener than asphalt shingles and other alternatives. It’s just a great option for residential construction.”

The installation went smoothly, Carson adds, primarily because he relied on the expertise of Dean Contracting. “My approach is to listen to the experts. Jesse Brown and his crew worked out the complex detailing. They use metal all the time and are extremely capable. We collaborated as necessary but I basically left it in their hands.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

Brown was quick to give full credit to the crew that was led by Juan Rojas, sheet-metal superintendent. Rojas is a 24-year employee of Dean Contracting and Brown cites Rojas’ attention to function and precise detailing as a main reason why the job turned out so well.

The house—in spite of its size and location in the hot Texas climate and the large amount of glass—is energy efficient. Two inches of rigid insulation was installed under the metal roof and an additional 4 inches of sprayed insulation went under the roof deck. “The heavy insulation and the shade provided by the overhang makes it very energy efficient. The house stays a very constant temperature,” Carson says.

The entire property captures rainwater in 18,000-gallon collection tanks, which is yet another reason for using metal, Carson points out.

When asked about the challenge of designing for yourself, Carson thought it was easier than designing for a traditional client. “I was probably more demanding in ‘getting it right’, but once I knew I had the right design and materials, I didn’t have to convince myself that it was the best direction. There was no negotiation or comprising the design in any way,” Carson says. “The biggest problem any architect has in designing for themselves is in ‘editing out.’ We know all of the possibilities, and being able to prioritize and filter out the unnecessary options is often the hardest challenge.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

ATAS National Sales Manager Receives Award

Mark Bus, national sales manager of ATAS International, received a Metal Construction Association Triumph Award at METALCON in Baltimore.  He was recognized as being someone who demonstrates excellence, creativity and initiative in his or her business or profession.
 
Jim Bush, vice president of Sales and Marketing states, “I have had the pleasure of watching Mark mature over the years to a young and emerging professional; not only within ATAS but also in the industry.  He has earned the respect of the ATAS sales team, as well as peers and management, through hard work and a sound decision making process.  Mark is also aware of industry initiatives and association activities and brings those into daily communications with staff and customers.”
 
An ATAS distributor, Allan Brock of Brock Associates, says, “During my forty year tenure in the commercial metal roofing and siding industry, I have rarely crossed paths with a young professional like Mark Bus.  I have seen Mark evolve from an inside technical sales person, to a regional product representative, to management.  At each level, he radiated professionalism along with product and technical knowledge.  It’s been a pleasure dealing with an individual as capable as Mark.”
 
Robert J. Bailey, AIA, CSI, CCS, LEED AP, specifications and constructability specialist with IKM Inc., also recommended Mark Bus for this award.  “Mark makes it a point to understand the people who are specifying and purchasing ATAS products.  As a new product rep in western Pennsylvania, he became involved in various CSI (Construction Specifications Institute) chapters.  It was clear to me that Mark knew in order to be prepared for a leadership role in ATAS, he first needed to understand the industry itself and establish important contacts and relationships there.  Mark is an example for other young sales professionals.”

Kemper System Is Developing Product Declarations to Meet LEED Requirements

To satisfy new LEED certification requirements for green building construction, Kemper System America Inc. is developing both Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) and Health Product Declarations (HPDs) for liquid-applied roofing and waterproofing products.

The latest version of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system, LEED v4, includes two new transparency elements for Building Product Disclosure and Optimization which can contribute up to four points towards a certification:

  • “Environmental Product Declarations” credits require the use of materials that meet EPD or similar disclosure criteria.
  • “Health Product Declarations” accrue “Material Ingredients Credits” for products that use designated methods to disclose composition to at least 0.1 percent.

To help customers obtain these new LEED certification points, Kemper System is planning to develop EPDs for products beginning in 2017 and issue upon completion; and to issue HPDs for all relevant products by the end of 2017.

Since the LEED rating system was developed by the U.S. Green Building Council in 1994, it has become a standard in green building certification, and it has adapted to meet the demands of building owners and regulators for transparency and sustainability.

GBRI Courses Assist Building Professionals Earn USGBC LEED Credential

The new LEED v4 Exam Preparation Package from education leaders GBRI (Green Building Research Institute) is an innovative way for green building professionals, architects and engineers to earn their LEED credential, signifying their in-depth knowledge of the LEED rating system, building codes and standards. The GBRI approach to LEED education allows green building professionals to earn their USGBC LEED Credential quickly and easily: using the live online, in-person and online on-demand learning modules, professionals can achieve their LEED credential in as little as four weeks. “Having worked in the field ourselves for decades, we get it. It’s no easy task to make time for exam preparation: professionals today need the online, on-demand and in-person flexibility that our courses offer,” commented Kayla Gerstenberg, director of education.

There is no pre-requisite necessary to take the LEED exam; the all-inclusive LEED v4 Exam Preparation Package includes everything professionals need to study for and pass the exam successfully. The package includes a study guide, online learning modules, and comprehensive practice exams with over 500 test questions (and explanations for each question). Offered online, online on-demand, and in-person, the course caters to many different learning styles and time schedules. Materials such as MP3 audio files, flash cards designed for studying on-the-go and memory charts are made available to aid the learning process. As GBRI boasts a large network of highly qualified instructors, courses are offered at locations throughout the United States and the world – from Vermont to Dubai.

Professionals can select from numerous specialties within the LEED credential: LEED Green Associate (GA), LEED AP Building Design + Construction (BD + C) and LEED AP Operations + Maintenance (O+M). Courses start at $199, and once signed up, students gain instant access so they can begin working toward their LEED credential immediately. To register or access more information about the online and on-demand online package, click here.

Project Profiles: Health Care

Mount Carmel New Albany, New Albany, Ohio

Team

Roofing Contractor: Smith Roofing, Columbus, Ohio

Bellaforté Slate composite roofing in Smokey Gray was installed on the 117,668-square-foot hospital.

Bellaforté Slate composite roofing in Smokey Gray was installed on the 117,668-square-foot hospital.

Roof Materials

Bellaforté Slate composite roofing in Smokey Gray was installed on the 117,668-square-foot hospital. The composite roofing has achieved a Class A Fire Rating in the ASTME E 108 fire test and withstands straight-line winds up to 110 mph in the ASTM D 3161 test. The roof tiles also resist impact, severe weather conditions and wind-driven rain. Bellaforté Slate tiles not only add safety to the structure, they also add aesthetic appeal.

Composite Roofing Manufacturer: DaVinci Roofscapes

Roof Report

The 60-room hospital features eight operating rooms and specializes in outpatient and inpatient orthopedic, neurologic and musculoskeletal care. The roof was installed in May 2015.

PHOTO: DaVinci Roofscapes

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MBMA Releases EPDs for Primary Rigid Framing, Secondary Framing and Metal Cladding

In order to meet the increasing demand for unbiased data about the environmental impacts of commercial construction, the Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) has released Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for three metal building product categories: primary rigid framing, secondary framing, and metal cladding for roofs and walls.

MBMA partnered with UL Environment (ULE) to develop and certify these EPDs, which summarize the cradle-to-gate environmental impacts of a metal building system. The cradle-to-gate method is used to describe the impact of producing products, from raw material extraction, through processing, fabrication and up to the finished product leaving the manufacturing facility.

EPDs provide specifiers, builders and other industry professionals with transparent third-party documentation of the environmental impacts of products, including global warming potential, ozone depletion, acidification and other factors. The LEED V4 green building rating system encourages the use of EPDs, which are important for earning credits in the program.

MBMA has been studying the sustainable attributes of metal buildings for several years, starting with the collection of the industry’s LCI data, and using it to perform whole-building LCA analysis to compare its products to other forms of construction. Through these studies, MBMA has shown that the structural efficiency of metal building systems is a key contributor to their sustainable performance when compared to conventional construction.

“There is a growing need to simplify and harmonize the decision-making processes for architects and specifiers that must choose building materials for construction,” says Dan Walker, associate general manager of MBMA. “MBMA members are dedicated to educating others about the sustainable performance of metal building systems, and these EPDs will effectively do that for the design community.”

Metal building systems are custom-engineered and fabricated in accordance with strict quality assurance standards, and with almost no scrap generated. Designers are beginning to realize that the structural efficiency of this approach brings tangible benefits, from a sustainability and cost-savings perspective. The completion of these EPDs gives designers the confidence that they are making a wise choice from financial and environmental aspects.

MBMA’s EPDs can now be found on the UL Environment website.

RCMA Updates Reflective Roof Coatings and LEED White Paper

The Washington, D.C.-based Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association has updated its reflective roof coatings and LEED white paper, originally issued by the Reflective Roof Coatings Institute (RRCI) in 2012. (RCMA and RRCI announced their merger in early 2015.)

The white paper explores the role of reflective roof coatings in the Washington-based U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Version 4 green-building program with emphasis on new building structure, existing building operation and maintenance, and LEED v4 prerequisites and credit requirements.

The white paper intends to provide understanding for stakeholders about the cost-effective contributions of roof coatings and the environmentally sound new building and renovation projects that use LEED v4. The white paper also serves as a resource, which outlines the benefits that reflective roof coatings provide to buildings, businesses and the environment. The findings in the LEED white paper apply to any reflective roof coatings that are LEED-compliant.

Bob Kobet of The Kobet Collaborative, Pittsburgh, is the author of the LEED white paper updates, as well as RRCI’s original white paper. Members of the RCMA Reflective Roof Coatings Institute, RCMA Technical Affairs Committee, and RCMA Codes and Standards Task Force collaborated on the project to update and revise the white paper to incorporate LEED’s new version.

The COP21 agreement presents a major opportunity for architects around the globe to provide leadership in designing buildings and communities that help reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. Its call for capacity building for adaptation and mitigation of climate change represents exactly what the architecture profession excels at providing,” says Russell Davidson, FAIA, AIA president, as the COP21 meeting of the United Nations Climate Change conference concluded.

The new “Reflective Roof Coatings and LEED v4” white paper is published online on RCMA’s website.

ICC and ASHRAE Outline Roles for Development of International Green Construction Code

In a deal nearly two years in the making, the International Code Council (ICC) and ASHRAE have signed the final agreement that outlines each organization’s role in the development and maintenance of the new version of the International Green Construction Code (IgCC) sponsored by the American Institute of Architects (AIA), ASHRAE, ICC, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). The code, scheduled to be released in 2018, will be powered by ANSI/ASHRAE/ICC/IES/USGBC Standard 189.1, Standard for the Design of High-Performance, Green Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings developed using the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) approved ASHRAE consensus process. The joint Standing Standards Project Committee 189.1 (SSPC) will serve as the consensus body that will work to ensure the standard is consistent and coordinated with the ICC Family of Codes.

The ICC will be responsible for Chapter 1, Scope and Administration. For the 2018 IgCC, ICC will coordinate the technical provisions developed by ASHRAE with the provisions in Chapter 1 of the 2015 IgCC. As a result, the 2016 Group B Cycle will not include Chapter 1 of the IgCC for code changes. With ASHRAE developing technical provisions, ICC’s 2017 Group C cycle to develop the 2018 IgCC has been cancelled. Part of the development process for the 2018 technical provisions will include the SSPC review of the 2015 IgCC and consideration of content for inclusion in 189.1-2017 along with changes generated by the committee and proposals submitted by stakeholders. Following the completion of the 2018 IgCC, Chapter 1 of the IgCC will be developed by ICC using its consensus code development process.

“Our goal in this partnership all along has been to share resources to increase use of the IgCC and make it simpler for code officials, designers and contractors to build environmentally efficient structures that will lessen energy and water consumption and reduce the carbon footprint,” said ICC Board President Guy Tomberlin, CBO. “We are now situated to do just that. We thank our partners, ICC Members and all who will contribute to the development of the IgCC powered by 189.1.”

The Executive Steering Committee for the effort to align 189.1, the IgCC and LEED consists of representatives of ICC, ASHRAE, USGBC, AIA and IES, and the SSPC Chair.

“The full integration of Standard 189.1 to serve as the technical content of the IgCC will leverage ASHRAE’s technical expertise and increase the standard’s influence on sustainable buildings,” notes ASHRAE President David Underwood. “We look forward to continuing to engage a broad spectrum of stakeholders in development of Standard 189.1 following the ANSI consensus standards development process. The result will be a comprehensive compliance tool that can be used by jurisdictions worldwide that are committed to a more sustainable built environment.”

The new publication also will align the Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) rating system program to ensure a streamlined, effective set of regulatory and above-code options. The green building certification program recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices. To receive LEED certification, building projects satisfy prerequisites and earn points to achieve different levels of certification

“This joint initiative will forge the fundamental regulatory building blocks of green construction on which future green building leadership initiatives can grow,” says Brendan Owens, chief of engineering at USGBC. “It takes courage to think differently and to commit to a new model, and for that we thank the leadership of the partner organizations behind the IgCC powered by 189.1.”

“Our combined membership, consisting of practicing design professionals, code officials, and the building industry representatives, supports the development of codes and standards that protect the health, safety and welfare of the public at large,” says AIA CEO Robert Ivy, FAIA. “Through this significant agreement, both the AIA and the ICC agree to work more closely to achieve our common goals.”

In 2010, ASHRAE and ICC joined forces by making 189.1 an alternative compliance path for the IgCC. The new agreement between ASHRAE and ICC furthers the effort these organizations initiated in 2010 by providing the market with a single code that is coordinated with the International Family of Codes.

“IES looks forward to continuing to partner with ASHRAE in developing technical content for Standard 189.1,” according to Rita Harrold, IES representative. “And to participating with the other organizations in this unique collaborative opportunity to satisfy the goals for the new version of IgCC.”

The agreement creates a comprehensive framework for jurisdictions looking to implement and adopt green building regulations and codes. The unprecedented collaboration leverages the unique organizational expertise of the partners participating in this evolution of green building codes and brings AIA, ASHRAE, ICC, IES and USGBC into strategic and tactical alignment on the relationship between 189.1 and the IgCC. Other organizations that support this vision and would like to join the effort are invited to contact Dominic Sims or Jeff Littleton.

The BTI-Greensburg John Deere Dealership Installs Tornado-Resistant Daylighting Systems and Other Sustainable Materials

On the night of May 4, 2007, brothers Kelly and Mike Estes saw their BTI-Greensburg John Deere Dealership obliterated by an EF5 tornado nearly 2-miles wide (according to the Enhanced Fujita Scale, which rates the strength of tornados by the damage caused; view the scale on page 3). Astoundingly, 95 percent of their town—Greensburg, Kan.—was also destroyed that day. The tornado did much more than rip roofs off buildings and toss things around; it turned the entire community into what looked like kindling.

Rarely do communities get hit by an EF5 tornado, which can come about when air masses collide. Sometimes warm, humid air from the Gulf of Mexico rises above drier air from the Southwest deserts in the U.S. This can create unstable conditions resulting in thunderstorms and worse. A strong collision of air masses creates a strong storm. Additionally, wind patterns and the jet stream can magnify the storm, resulting in what people refer to as “the perfect storm”.

After being completely destroyed by an EF5 tornado, the BTI-Greensburg John Deere Dealership has been rebuilt in Greensburg, Kan., in a better, greener way.

After being completely destroyed by an EF5 tornado, the BTI-Greensburg John Deere Dealership has been rebuilt in Greensburg, Kan., in a better, greener way.

Despite the large-scale losses incurred by the entire town, 100 customers and friends of the Estes family showed up the morning of May 5 to help them salvage what remained of their business. Shortly after the tornado disaster, Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius stated her wish that Greensburg become the “the greenest city in the state”.

As part of their commitment to their community, Kelly, Mike and their family decided to rebuild their business in a better, greener way. They wanted the new 28,000-square-foot prefabricated metal building to be the world’s greenest farm-machinery facility; attain a LEED Platinum rating from the Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Green Building Council; and use the least energy possible. One of the most important considerations was using building materials that could withstand future tornados.

DAYLIGHTING

To help achieve LEED Platinum and outlast any future high-velocity winds, they incorporated 12 Daylighting Systems in their retail area’s roof to showcase their merchandise; reduce lighting energy costs; and flood the area with natural light, a benefit for customers and employees.

The Daylighting Systems capture light through a dome on the roof and channel it down through a highly reflective tube. This tubing is more efficient than a traditional drywall skylight shaft, which can lose over half of the potential light. The tubing fits between rafters and installs with no structural modification. At the ceiling level, a diffuser that resembles a recessed light fixture spreads the light evenly throughout the room.

The dome is made from high-quality acrylic resin that is specifically formulated for increased impact strength, chemical- and weather-resistance, and high clarity (a polycarbonate inner dome is used for high-velocity hurricane zones). Domes are engineered to deflect midday heat and maximize low-angle light capture. The tubing is made from puncture-proof aluminum sheet coated with the highly reflective material for maximum light transfer. The units (independently tested by Architectural Testing in Fresno, Calif.) comply with various building codes including the 2009 International Building Code and 2010 Florida Building Code, including high-velocity hurricane zones.

“When our power went out one time for four hours, we were able to keep the shop open and operating due to daylight strategies, which includes the Daylighting Systems,” notes Mike Estes. “We didn’t anticipate this benefit but we’re really happy to have this bonus.”
PHOTO: SOLATUBE INTERNATIONAL INC.

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300,000 Pounds of Polymer Roofing Tile Scraps Are Recycled Annually at DaVinci Roofscapes

The 45th anniversary of Earth Day in 2015 puts a shining spotlight on recycling efforts around the country—including at DaVinci Roofscapes in Kansas. That’s where more than 300,000 pounds of polymer roofing tile scraps are recycled each year.

“Most manufacturing operations have scrap materials,” says Bryan Ward, vice president of operations at DaVinci Roofscapes in Lenexa, Kan. “The difference here is that every roofing tile we create is 100 percent recyclable, so we are able to reuse every pound of scrap that comes off our production line into our roofing material’s starter shingles. This saves a significant amount of material from going to the landfill, along with making us an efficient, environmentally friendly operation.”

With more than 300,000 pounds of scrap recycled annually, DaVinci doesn’t stop there. The polymer slate and shake roofing manufacturer offers two recycling programs that provide a way for roofers to return scraps, cuttings and unused synthetic roofing material to the company’s facility for recycling.

Waste products from a job site can be returned to DaVinci’s Kansas plant for recycling (with shipping paid for by DaVinci within a 500-mile radius of the plant) and expired tiles (those older than 50 years old) can also be returned for recycling. Ward estimates that almost 5,000 pounds of product are returned from field projects each year for recycling.

Selecting polymer roofing tiles also helps save trees and energy. “Every time someone chooses a DaVinci roof instead of wood shakes, trees are saved—often young growth cedars that are difficult to harvest, produce low-quality shingles and further deplete our limited resources,” says Ward. “Natural slate roofs present other problems. The quarrying process consumes large amounts of labor and fuel and can be harmful to the local ecosystem. Up to 15 percent of natural slate tiles crack or break up during installation, so waste is significant. Because DaVinci tiles weigh one-third as much as natural slate of comparable thickness, transportation energy costs and carbon emissions are lower.

“Just as it’s important to us that all our sustainable roofing products are Made in America, it’s also vital that we keep our earth as clean and healthy as possible for future generations,” says Ward. “We’re a company that celebrates Earth Day every day of the year. By creating roofing products that meet Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification process standards, we’re taking a step toward saving valuable resources.”