USGBC Releases Annual Ranking of Top 10 States for LEED

The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) released its annual ranking of the Top 10 States in the nation for LEED with the state of Illinois placing first.

The per-capita list highlights states throughout the country that are making impactful strides in sustainable building design, construction and transformation. LEED-certified spaces use less energy and water resources; save money for families, businesses and taxpayers; reduce carbon emissions; and create a healthier environment for residents, workers and the larger community.

“Every story about a green building is a story about people,” says Rick Fedrizzi, CEO and founding chair, USGBC. “USGBC’s annual recognition of the Top 10 States for LEED goes beyond gross square feet or number of projects and factors in LEED’s potential in a given state to be part of the daily life of the state’s residents. This per-capita approach tells a great story about how LEED has become an important benchmark in the transformation of the nation’s built environment. LEED-certified buildings and the innovations they have driven contribute substantially to our national economic growth, create jobs and improve the quality of life in the communities where they are found. We commend the business and community leaders, policy makers and green building professionals in each of these states for making the commitment to create a healthier, more sustainable future.

“Illinois has so many committed business and community leaders, policy makers and green building professionals who are using LEED to transform their built environment, producing many innovative spaces that will improve the health of our shared planet, as well as the health of the people who use those buildings every day,” adds Fedrizzi.

The per-capita list is based on 2010 U.S. Census data and includes commercial and institutional green building projects that were certified throughout 2014. Illinois certified 174 projects representing 42,457,254 square feet of real estate, or 3.31 square feet per resident, in 2014.

USGBC calculates the list using per-capita figures as a measure of the human element of green building, allowing for a fair comparison of the level of green building taking place among states with significant differences in population and, accordingly, number of overall buildings.

“Illinois has long been a green building trend setter where companies have made sustainability part of their business plan,” says Brian Imus, executive director of USGBC Illinois Chapter. “As a result, Illinois is now positioned to be a leading exporter of sustainable technology and design to emerging markets where demand for LEED is growing exponentially.”

A sample of notable projects certified in Illinois in 2014 include:

There are more than 487 USGBC member organizations with a headquarters in Illinois and more than 10,273 LEED credential professionals across the state.

The full ranking of the top 10 states includes:

 Rank  State  Projects certified in 2014  Square feet LEED certified in 2014  Per-capita square footage
 
1
 
Illinois
 
174
 
42,457,254
 
3.31
 
2
 
Colorado
 
102
 
15,816,498
 
3.15
 
3
 
Maryland
 
132
 
15,583,423
 
2.70
 
4
 
Virginia
 
150
 
18,617,712
 
2.33
 
5
 
Massachusetts
 
99
 
14,662,950
 
2.20
 
6
 
Hawaii
 
30
 
2,657,808
 
1.95
 
7
 
California
 
517
 
69,762,936
 
1.87
 
8
 
Georgia
 
87
 
17,748,781
 
1.83
 
9
 
Minnesota
 
39
 
9,511,684
 
1.79
 
10 (tied)
 
Arizona
 
82
 
11,152,201
 
1.74
 
10 (tied)
 
New York
 
250
 
33,691,209
 
1.74
 
Not ranked
 
Washington D.C.
 
102
 
17,716,622
 
29.44

(Washington is not ranked, because it is a federal district, not a state.)

Collectively, 1,662 commercial and institutional projects became LEED certified within the top 10 states in 2014, representing 251.7 million square feet of real estate. Worldwide, 4,502 projects were certified in 2014, representing 675.7 million square feet.

More than 26,600 projects representing 3.6 billion square feet of space have been LEED certified to date, with another 42,000 projects representing 8.8 billion square feet in the pipeline for certification. USGBC launched LEED v4, the newest version of the rating system, in the fall of 2013. The latest version continues to raise the bar for the entire green building industry, which Forbes Magazine projects could be worth up to $960 billion globally by 2023. LEED v4 features increased technical rigor; new market sector adaptations for data centers, warehouses and distribution centers, hospitality, existing schools, existing retail and midrise residential projects; and a simplified submittal process supported by a robust and intuitive technology platform.

Congress Associates Announces Sales Representative Agreement with Karnak Corp.

Congress Associates announces a new independent sales representative agreement with Karnak Corp. Congress Associates will be responsible for product representation in all of the New England states including Connecticut and the Albany, N.Y., market. The company has represented coating and restoration systems for numerous years and is pleased to align itself with Karnak reflective and fire retardant coatings.

“Karnak has been long known for quality coating products and offers a line of high end restoration and waterproofing systems,” says John Massengill, Congress Associates president. “We are constantly looking to improve our service offerings by aligning ourselves with manufacturers at the forefront of product development. Karnak is the perfect addition to our roofing and waterproofing services offered. Our customers further benefit from innovative solutions provided by trusted sources in the industry to best protect their assets.”

Karnak manufactures a complete line of reflective coatings, cements and sealants for roofing, waterproofing and maintenance. Karnak is the premier manufacturer of Energy Star labeled coatings. All products are tested for fire resistance and wind uplift, approved by UL, FM, certified to comply with ASTM specifications and are CRRC listed. The company’s Energy Star labeled coatings qualify for LEED points as part of LEED Certified buildings.

Moisture, water intrusion and reducing energy consumption are a concern for all building owners and property managers. Karnak Kanopy reflective roof and maintenance coatings reduce roof surface temperature by preventing heat absorption, extend the life of the roof and reduce building operating costs. These coatings lessen the heat island effect, benefiting the environment.

USGBC and other Code-, Regulation- and Guideline-setting Bodies Are Increasingly Working with Industry

Earlier this year, the USGBC announced a 16-month extension to register products under LEED 2009, prior to the implementation of LEED v4 on Oct. 31, 2016. The action set off speculation, both off and online, about what caused USGBC to act with some calling for a more in-depth explanation for the delay. But the real reason, most likely, was simply stated in USGBC’s own press release: In a survey taken at GreenBuild in late October, 61 percent of respondents—almost two-thirds of those polled—said they are “not ready” or “unsure” if they were ready to pursue LEED v4 and required additional time to prepare. USGBC said it was also getting the same message from the international community.

The response to the USGBC action tended to fall into two camps: those who said the council was caving to the pressure of industry and those who said USGBC was taking a reasonable action after having put forward a complicated, unworkable and unneeded ratings system. Based on my extensive work with code-setting and regulatory bodies, I see a third option emerging, one that bodes well for the environment and the building sector.

During the past year, as part of my job as associate executive director of the EPDM Roofing Association (ERA), I have attended and testified at more than 20 hearings held by a broad range of groups, including the IGCC, SCAQMD (the South Coast Air Quality Management District, overseeing much of Southern California) and ASHRAE. Frequently, I have been accompanied by representatives of our member companies, Firestone, Carlisle and Johns Manville. And often I have been joined by members of industry groups, such as the American High-Performance Buildings Coalition.

Collectively, we have offered our findings on a range of issues that are critical to our industry, such as the importance of climate in the choice of roofing color and the need to preserve the builder’s choice when deciding on reflectivity options and the unique qualities of ballasted roofing that should be considered in any code-setting activities. Our testimony is based on meticulous research, as well as on empirical evidence and firsthand knowledge gained from years of experience in the building industry. Increasingly, we find that we are listened to and that our interaction with code-setting and regulatory bodies is a mutually beneficial exchange of ideas, rather than an adversarial give-and-take.

For instance, we worked closely with the Ozone Transport Commission in its efforts to achieve federally mandated clean air standards in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states. Initially, we pointed out that their proposed regulations would have mandated the use of low-VOC products that were in development but not yet available in the marketplace. And we also demonstrated that the roofing industry would need ample time to train roofing contractors in the use of these new products. We worked with regulators, state by state, and developed a mutually agreed upon seasonal approach. While the process is still ongoing, many state regulators expressed their gratitude for the advice we offered and the expertise we brought to the table.

I am certainly not privy to the inner workings of the USGBC. But their extension of the deadline for the implementation of LEED v4 seems to be part of a trend: The groups who are drawing up codes, regulations, and ratings systems are increasingly working with the building industry and the end results are based on good science and good sense.

NRCA Outlines Roofing-related Provisions of LEED v4

In an effort to help the roofing industry become familiar with the roofing-related provisions of the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Version 4, NRCA has released LEED v4: Roofing-Related Provisions. It is intended to provide roofing professionals a broad overview of the roofing-related credits and prerequisites for LEED’s Building Design and Construction and Building Operations and Maintenance categories. In addition, a listing of typical LEEDrelated submittals and what roofing related provisions have changed in LEED v4 versus previous LEED editions also are included. For more information, visit NRCA.net.

Quest Construction Products Is Trademark Licensee of Kynar Aquatec Coating Technology

Arkema Inc. is pleased to announce that Quest Construction Products is now a trademark licensee of Kynar Aquatec high-performance coating technology in North America. Quest Construction Products uses Kynar Aquatec technology as the basis for its Kymax brand of protective coatings for new or existing roof surfaces.

“While we have a long history of partnering with Quest Construction Products on their high-quality Kymax coatings, it gives us great pleasure to welcome them as an official licensee of Kynar Aquatec,” said Vince Casmirri, marketing manager of architectural coatings at Arkema Inc. “Our licensing program is a key component of our strategy to provide customers the support and innovative technology they need to succeed, and we are pleased with the outstanding recognition that Kymax coatings has achieved in the cool white roof market.”

Kynar Aquatec is an innovative platform of emulsions for producing premium water-based coatings with low VOC levels below 100 grams/liter. Coatings formulated with these emulsions can provide the durability and performance of traditional Kynar 500 resin-based coatings and can easily be applied to a variety of substrates, including metals, plastics, wood, concrete, textiles and previously painted surfaces. Given their low-VOC waterborne character, excellent durability and weatherability, and ability to be formulated with IR reflective pigments for lasting building efficiency, the Kynar Aquatec emulsions offer sustainable coating solutions for a wide variety of building requirements.

“We are extremely pleased to have been selected as an official trademark licensee of Kynar Aquatec latex,” said Michelle Carlin, product manager at Quest Construction Products. “This program provides a growth platform for strong brand owners in the architectural roof coatings market by capitalizing on the proven success of Kynar Aquatec technology by Arkema.”

Kymax coatings are manufactured using Kynar Aquatec emulsions to deliver the proven durability and performance of traditional Kynar PVDF coatings. However, rather than requiring high-temperature baking, they are air-dry finishes that cure at ambient temperatures. Designed as a liquid applied roofing product over new or existing roofs, Kymax provides the ultimate in reflectivity, color stability, algae resistance and weatherability. It is also certified to meet ENERGY STAR, Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC), LEED and California Title 24 reflectance and emissivity criteria.

Roof Systems Contribute to Success of 2014 FIFA World Cup

The Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) World Cup is the king of soccer competitions, so it’s only appropriate that four of the 2014 venues are crowned with roof systems that are as strong as the competition inside the venues. Three venues feature lightweight tensile structures from Birdair and the fourth includes polycarbonate skylights from PALRAM.

Estadio Mineirão

Estadio Mineirão, built in 1965 and listed as a national monument of Brazil, underwent a three-year modernization project to prepare for hosting six of the FIFA World Cup matches.

Estadio Mineirão, built in 1965 and listed as a national monument of Brazil, underwent a three-year modernization project to prepare for hosting six of the FIFA World Cup matches.

Estadio Mineirão, built in 1965 and listed as a national monument of Brazil, underwent a three-year modernization project to prepare for hosting six of the FIFA World Cup matches. It was transformed into a modern stadium with a new tensile roofing system from Birdair. The 141,000-square-foot tensile roof was added to the concrete upper tier of the stadium to provide shelter for 70,000 spectators while meeting aesthetic, acoustic and environmental impact requirements.

Birdair fabricated and supplied TiO2-coated PTFE, a Teflon-coated woven fiberglass membrane for the facility. Taiyo Birdair do Brasil, a subsidiary of Birdair, was responsible for installing the PTFE tensile membrane. TiO2 (titanium dioxide), a non-toxic and flame-resistant coating allows fabric to break down any organic materials that settle on the membrane, such as dirt. It is capable of withstanding temperatures from -100 F to 500 F, is unaffected by UV rays, and requires less maintenance to retain its appearance due to its self-cleaning capabilities. Ultimately, this TiO2 membrane is an economic and environmentally sustainable renovation that will provide fans with much-needed comfort, as well as improve a national landmark.

Estádio Nacional

Estádio Nacional expanded its capacity from 42,200 to 70,042 to host seven World Cup matches.

Estádio Nacional expanded its capacity from 42,200 to 70,042 to host seven World Cup matches.

Estádio Nacional, originally built in 1974 and located in Brazil’s capital, also underwent major reconstruction for the World Cup, expanding its capacity from 42,200 to 70,042 to host seven World Cup matches. Birdair fabricated and supplied the PTFE fiberglass membrane, clamping and hardware for the facility. The consortium Taiyo Birdair do Brasil ­Entap ­Protende was responsible for installing the entire roof’s steel and cable structure, including the PTFE outer roof and liner membrane. The project involved building a new lower tier and retaining the upper tier with the addition of a new 920,000-square-foot double-layer suspended tensile roof.

Fonte Nova Stadium

Fonte Nova Stadium's oval-shape roof design will provide cover for 50,000 spectators during each of the six games it hosts during the tournament.

Fonte Nova Stadium’s oval-shape roof design will provide cover for 50,000 spectators during each of the six games it hosts during the tournament.

Birdair, through Taiyo Birdair do Brasil (TBB) Ltda., additionally was awarded a subcontract for the roof construction of Fonte Nova Stadium in Salvador, Brazil. The stadium is modeled on its predecessor, the Estadio Octavio Mangabeira, and features three levels of seating with a view of the magnificent Dique do Tororó. Its oval-shape roof design will provide cover for 50,000 spectators during each of the six games hosted at Fonte Nova during the tournament.

Birdair’s project role consisted of detailing, fabricating and supplying PTFE, a Teflon-coated woven fiberglass membrane that makes up the facility’s lightweight tensile roofing system. Taiyo Birdair do Brazil fully installed the PTFE membrane for the 301,399-square-foot tensile roof. The facility’s tensile roof provides natural daylighting, solar shading and minimal maintenance, as well as contributes to the unique aesthetics of the new Fonte Nova Stadium.

PTFE fiberglass membrane structures have received increased global recognition as green living is becoming more important. Upon completion, Estádio Mineirão and Estádio Nacional applied for LEED certification, which is given to projects that use less materials and increase daylighting to conserve resources and increase sustainability.

Plácido Castelo

PALRAM qualified for its second consecutive World Cup games, this time covering the Plácido Castelo stadium with SUNTUF 2-millimeter-thick roofing.

The Plácido Castelo Stadium in Fortaleza, Brazil, features SUNTUF corrugated polycarbonate.

The Plácido Castelo Stadium in Fortaleza, Brazil, is popularly known as “Castelão”, part of a local tradition to nickname popular stadiums.

The Plácido Castelo Stadium in Fortaleza, Brazil, is popularly known as “Castelão”, part of a local tradition to nickname popular stadiums. Owned by the Brazilian government and inaugurated in 1973, the stadium was revamped for the 2014 World Cup.

“The Palram Project Support Team was given the task of providing an architectural solution for the roof skylight. The proposal implemented was a 7,000-square-meter transparent front edge roofing specially designed to allow natural daylight on the pitch,” says Tal Furman, Palram chief engineer.

The solution offered by PALRAM was based on its continuing worldwide stadium roofing trend using SUNTUF transparent corrugated polycarbonate sheets, as a front edge covering, providing a perfect cost effective watertight solution.

A 7,000-square-meter transparent front edge from PALRAM was specially designed to allow natural daylight on the pitch.

A 7,000-square-meter transparent front edge was specially designed to allow natural daylight on the pitch.

For the Castelão stadium roof, PALRAM specified 9-meter single length SUNTUF corrugated polycarbonate sheets that cover the entire roof length, thus ensuring long term transparency for the skylight and reduced risk for leakage.

The Arena Castelão will host six World Cup matches, including a first round match between Brazil and Mexico and one of the quarter-finals. It was the first Brazilian Stadium to obtain the LEED certification. Since its re-inauguration, the Arena Castelão has hosted more than 50 matches of the local league and of the Brazil Cup. The stadium also hosted matches of the 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup and world-class concerts from artists like Paul McCartney and Beyoncé.

As part of PALRAM preparation for the World Cup, a polycarbonate roofing solutions professional seminar was held in front of Brazil top architects, engineers and construction professionals by Mr. Michel Allouch, Palram V.P. Marketing and development. As a result of this seminar, the same solution was implemented by PALRAM project team as well at the new Palmeiras Stadium in São Paulo, although this stadium is not hosting the World Cup games.

For over 50 years, PALRAM has been a global leader in manufacturing extruded thermoplastic sheets, offering an extensive product line for consumer, architectural, construction, sign & display, and agricultural applications.

The 20th FIFA World Cup is scheduled for June 12 through July 13, 2014 in 12 different Brazil host cities.

RoofPoint’s Initial Growth Rate Exceeds the Relative Growth Rate of LEED

Given the thousands of commercial roofs installed across North America each year and the billions of square feet of opportunity those roofs represent, RoofPoint is only beginning to realize its market potential. The Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing is often asked to evaluate how RoofPoint is performing relative to whole building green rating systems. The chart below offers an answer to that question.

RoofPoint compared to other green-building rating systems

Recently, the U.S. Green Building Council, the founder of LEED, released a 13-year summary of LEED-certified projects showing how the program has grown from a handful of buildings in its first year to more than 10,000 projects 13 years later. USGBC has certainly compiled an impressive resume of projects, but the center thinks the most striking fact involves how the first three years of RoofPoint and LEED compare to each other.

As shown in the chart above, RoofPoint’s initial growth rate has exceeded the relative growth rate of LEED significantly. In fact, the roofing industry has driven the number of RoofPoint projects to a level that exceeds what took the entire green building industry six years to pass.

The success RoofPoint has experienced to date is primarily driven by the hundreds of industry leaders who have participated and submitted projects. The center thanks you for helping it launch RoofPoint, and asks that you stay tuned in 2014 as it moves this important program to the next level of achievement with a number of exciting new programs and initiatives.

Green-building Innovation Is Important, But So Is Refinement

In March 2006, I swore allegiance to the wildly popular green-building movement. I even put the kibosh on my favorite joke about recycling in the landfill—you know, so not to deprive future generations of fossil fuels and diamonds. Nice.

I’ve worked in facility management at Duke University Health System for 26 years. In this profession, being overly pragmatic is an occupational hazard. So, why did an “old-school” guy (no pun intended) show up at a green love fest alongside folk with funny-colored hair and way too many bumper stickers? Quite simply, I came to the party to plea for intellectual honesty.

Unfortunately, early on, the sustainability movement offered myriad earth-friendly materials often with little thought to their durability or life cycle. Similarly, early building rating programs focused largely on the merits of individual products without factoring their proper integration into functional systems or assemblies. Consider, for example, the many thousands of squares of reflective “cool roofing” membranes applied over non-durable assemblies. A LEED-applicable roofing membrane that fails prematurely because of inferior quality or misapplication does not look very sustainable buried in a landfill.

It’s no longer 2006, and the greenie you’re partying with may be a blue-haired, retired architect. It’s encouraging so many in the building industry, and particularly the roofing industry, have embraced the concept of durability as the essence of green and sustainable building design. Moving beyond mere branding “strategery,” sustainability can be good for the bottom line. On the Duke campus, a 2007 roof replacement used forward-thinking design to divert 718 tons of solid waste. Salvaged materials from this effort included 296,000 board feet of XPS insulation, which was repurposed in new roofing construction on three Duke buildings. It’s our story. And it’s simply good business.

It has been said “architecture is storytelling.” The story of our 2007 roof replacement project settled forever how Duke University Health System will conduct itself in regard to sustainable roofing design and environmental stewardship. We distilled our story into the following “Guiding Principles of Sustainable Roofing”:

  • 1. Favor insulations or insulating assemblies that are highly resistant to water and physical damage.
  • 2. Favor roof assemblies that position the roof membrane directly over a permanent or semi-permanent substrate.
  • 3. Favor roof designs that prohibit or highly discourage the entrapment of water within the roof assembly.
  • 4. Favor membrane and insulation designs capable of in-place reuse or recycle in future roof iterations.

Through the years, these guiding principles have produced a dramatic improvement in roofing performance on our campus. In particular, our emphasis on adaptive reuse of materials will minimize our impact on the environment, as well as reduce future demand on hospital resources–resources best used in support of outstanding patient care or cancer research, not funding a premature roof replacement. Interestingly, the U.S. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C., has recently incorporated our guiding principles in facilities standards for future public building construction. Now our story has legs.

In April 2013, I attended the Energy Efficient Roofing Conference in Charlotte. I was invited to participate in the program, offering a building owner’s perspective about emerging roofing technologies. The focus, primarily, was energy-efficient roofing as a value proposition: how to achieve it and how to sell it. The format leaned heavily on panel discussions, which produced large amounts of banter and at times outright tension regarding the subjects at hand. It was as if someone handed a microphone to the elephant in the room. Has the proposition become a “solution” in search of a “problem”?

Don’t misunderstand; everyone can see the benefits in much (but not all) of the new energy-efficient roofing innovations and building codes. But should we be excited about reflective or solar membranes on massively thick R-30 minimum insulation while still far too many roof installations will fail prematurely because of shortsighted design and construction? If quality and durability are of utmost value, do you—the roofing contractor— know how to achieve it and how to sell it? Should you care?

Back in 2006, I believed everyone was trying to “out green” each other; durability be damned. Today, I wonder if the problem is that everyone wants to “out innovate” each other. As we’ve witnessed with green, the danger when innovation means everything is that it can soon mean nothing.

Innovation is exciting and necessary, but so is refinement. Refinement may be the most powerful strategy of all, yet it remains under emphasized. The most effective way to celebrate refinement is by creating new stories–new institutional memories. Roofing contractor, you are the biographer. Run with that.