New Hip and Ridge Shingle Design Adds Dimension to Any Roof

Atlas Pro-Cut High Profile Hip & Ridge featuring Scotchgard Protector shingles were created to provide high-performance hip and ridge protection for roofs in both sun belt and snow belt climates.

Atlas Pro-Cut High Profile Hip & Ridge featuring Scotchgard Protector shingles were created to provide high-performance hip and ridge protection for roofs in both sun belt and snow belt climates.

Atlas Roofing announces the release of the Pro-Cut High Profile Hip & Ridge, a high-profile hip and ridge shingle design that adds dimension to any roof. This high profile hip and ridge shingle features a flexible design that does away with the need for hand bending, undue flexing, and opening or closing of hip and ridge shingles.

Atlas Pro-Cut High Profile Hip & Ridge featuring Scotchgard Protector shingles were created to provide high-performance hip and ridge protection for roofs in both sun belt and snow belt climates.

Each Pro-Cut High Profile Hip & Ridge shingle is pre-cut to save roofers time on the deck and produce a more consistent appearance. Workers simply remove each shingle unit from its carton and place it on the ridge as-is. Shingles are packed 30 per box with each box covering 20 linear feet.

Atlas Pro-Cut High Profile Hip & Ridge featuring Scotchgard Protector shingles are manufactured with SBS modified asphalt for increased durability, longer life and easier installation. SBS (styrene-butadiene-styrene) forms a polymer network within the bitumen, giving the bitumen rubber-like characteristics as well as resistance to aging and weathering. This product is an eligible accessory for the Atlas Signature Select System warranty. Equally important, Atlas Pro-Cut High Profile Hip & Ridge shingles are Class A UL R4052 approved and meet the following standards: UL 997 Wind Resistance, CAN/CSA-A123.5 and ASTM D3462.

Because Pro-Cut High Profile Hip & Ridge is made with Scotchgard Protector, the color is supported by an Atlas lifetime warranty against the black streaks caused by algae. Atlas offers six popular colors to choose from. Visit the Pro-Cut High Profile Hip & Ridge Color Guide to determine which one will match best with your selected shingle color.

Does a Low Price Mean Good Value or Bad Quality?

Why can’t roofing industry professionals understand that old technology and outdated products that have outlived their usefulness are no longer really considered competition but are a target for replacement? Higher-performing and technically advanced products replace outdated and underperforming products all the time. They don’t try to compete with them on price. That doesn’t always seem to be the case in the roofing industry.

The bar has to be set higher—not lower—when dealing with all types of products in the roofing industry; I tend to notice this disconnect when it comes to woven synthetic underlayments because of my line of business. However, test standards and inspection compliance should reflect the quality of all products in the industry. Today’s consumer is not demanding lower-performing products at lower prices with the intention that the materials on their house or business will not last and will not endure the weather and heat from the sun.

In addition, the roofing industry’s practice of selling the customer a 40- to 50-year or lifetime-warrantied roof with an underlayment that is warrantied for five or 10 years should be discontinued because this concept is not in the best interest of the customer. This is especially true when those products are used in a way that is in conflict with the restrictions placed on price-oriented imported products. Buyers, including roofing contractors, builders, distributors and homeowners, need to read the data and instruction materials to fully understand what they are buying.

Cheaper is not better! Better is better! There is no getting around it. If suppliers and manufacturers are going to employ salesmen and women, they ought to be able to sell the products in their charge and be able to give the buyer reasons why they should buy their product. For example, do you really think the consumer who is buying the higher-end asphalt shingle product wants a lower-end synthetic underlayment? You’re supposed to be replacing poor-quality products, not competing with them.

Using poor-quality cheap products is yesterday’s thinking. You’re not serving the public’s needs with that thought process. Quality and proven performance levels are being demanded in today’s marketplace, and price has nothing to do with it.

Why can’t the roofing industry understand this and stop this race to the bottom?