Cap Sheet Reflects Ultraviolet Rays, Absorbs Less Heat

The RCap Plus cap sheet features reflective white granules embedded into the membrane to reflect ultraviolet rays and absorb less heat.

The RCap Plus cap sheet features reflective white granules embedded into the membrane to reflect ultraviolet rays and absorb less heat.

Malarkey Roofing Products has introduced the RCap Plus cap sheet for low slope, commercial roofing systems. It features reflective white granules embedded into the membrane to reflect ultraviolet rays and absorb less heat.

RCap Plus utilizes ground and packed granules, and these granules ensure more coverage in the membrane per square. Malarkey grinds the asphalt granules at its South Gate, Calif., manufacturing facility.

The solar reflectivity and limited heat absorption of the RCap Plus cap sheet are key design features of the product. RCap Plus meets CEC Title 24, Part 6 standards and has an initial Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) rating of 87. As part of a roof system, RCap Plus may help decrease energy costs used to cool the building and extend roof service life.

NRCA Releases 2015-16 Market Survey

NRCA has released its 2015-16 market survey, providing information about overall sales-volume trends in the roofing industry, roofing experiences, material usage and regional breakdowns. It is an important tool to measure the scope of the U.S. roofing industry, and the data provides a glimpse into which roof systems are trending in the low- and steep-slope roofing markets.

This year’s survey reports sales volumes for 2015 and 2016 projections averaged between $8 million and almost $9 million, respectively, and revealed a near-steady ratio of low- to steep-slope sales of 74 percent to 26 percent.

For low-slope roofs, TPO remains the market leader with a 40 percent share of the new construction market and 30 percent of the reroofing market for 2015. Asphalt shingles continue to dominate the steep-slope roofing market with a 47 percent market share for new construction and a 59 percent share for reroofing.

Polyisocyanurate insulation continues to lead its sector of the market with 80 percent of new construction and 73 percent of reroofing work. In addition, roof cover board installation for 2015 was reported as 22 percent in new construction, 42 percent in reroofing tear-offs and 36 percent in re-cover projects.

NRCA’s market survey enables roofing contractors to compare their material usage with contractors in other regions and provides manufacturers and distributors with data to analyze, which can affect future business decisions.

NRCA members may download a free electronic copy of the 2016 survey.

Roofing Problem Areas

Flat roofs are prone to ponding water.

Flat roofs are prone to ponding water.

Facilities maintenance issues can have a major impact on productivity in industrial and commercial environments with something as small as a leaking roof causing significant disruption and downtime. Years of experience suggest that 90 percent of the problems we are presented with today will arise from a mere 10 percent of the roof’s total area. But are some roof types and roof areas more susceptible to damage than others? Moreover, how do these roofing problems arise and how can they be categorized?

Flat Roofs

Flat roofs are commonly chosen for industrial and commercial buildings, covering the vast majority of offices, factories and warehouses around the globe. However, despite their popularity, my firm’s experience indicates that the bulk of roofing applications owe to the failings of flat roofs. This begs the question; do the benefits of flat roofs outweigh the disadvantages?

Currently, the flat roofing market is in a particularly healthy state. It is easy to see why because flat roofs do in fact offer a great deal of advantages. Notably, they are a low-cost option for many projects, being easier and more economical to install, inspect and maintain. Therefore, they prove highly popular with many commercial facilities and industrial buildings.

However, flat roofs are historically problematic, suffering from an array of issues commonly arising from standing water and traditional roofing materials. Pooling of water on roofs can be attributed to inadequate roofing materials or, strangely, a roof being “too flat”. Flat roofs should actually feature a small gradient to allow sufficient rainwater run-off; otherwise, the weight of water pooling can lead to deflection and numerous subsequent issues.

Roof flashings can prove problematic due to dissimilar materials.

Roof flashings can prove problematic due to dissimilar materials.

Of course, other roof variations, such as pitched or slanted roofs, will offer their own range of complications; however, complications with pooling water are not among these. This distinct disadvantage is one of several that can lead to serious problems within that troublesome 10 percent. The most common problems can be split into three separate categories.

Dissimilar Materials
Most roofs form a veritable patchwork of materials, including anything from glass and plastics to masonry and metals. Industrial roofs can be particularly troublesome as they boast a multitude of pipes, heating units and other protrusions that make the roof geometry complex to cover effectively. Whatever the combination of roofing materials is, ensuring long-term adhesion and sealing between all these dissimilar materials is crucial—and can prove problematic.

Flashings fall into this category and are a common fixture of flat and pitched roofs, where metal, brick and felt or bitumen can often all meet. Exposed to varying temperatures and weather conditions, these materials can act differently, altering shape and size dependent upon that material’s characteristics. This can result in roofing weakness due to different expansion and contraction rates of the materials, allowing for water ingress through developing gaps. Moreover, this category includes areas where two metals may meet. Dissimilar metals exposed to continuous weathering can potentially lead to galvanic corrosion, which deteriorates the roof’s protection, loosening the materials and once again leading to issues like leaking.

Joints and Seams
Joints and seams spell considerable trouble for many roofs, predominantly due to the effects of movement. All buildings will feature a degree of movement as a result of thermal expansion, contraction and wind, making joints and seams one of the most vulnerable areas. Resulting gaps or lips can be created, increased further by wind uplift, which may allow water ingress or exposure of unprotected materials to corrosion and weathering.

Seams around skylights and roof protrusions can cause roof vulnerabilities.

Seams around skylights and roof protrusions can cause roof vulnerabilities.

Found whenever two materials meet, joints and seams are a common sight on industrial roofs and one that occurs frequently on roofs covered using traditional materials. For instance, felt or bitumen surfaces are layered in strips and require heat to fuse them together and create one barrier of protection. However, continuous exposure to the elements can lead to delamination of the roofing material, creating areas of vulnerability, such as lips.

Similarly, parapet walls can also become vulnerable at the joints, normally caused by movement between the brickwork. This can develop through movement in the building or perhaps vegetation forcing through the joint, widening any gaps further and causing moisture ingress. Furthermore, this problem is shared by the seams around skylights and glazing bars, which degrade over time due to the dissimilar materials present and associated movement.

Unlike other problem areas in this category, cut-edge corrosion does not stem from two materials meeting. In fact, it falls into this category as it is an uncoated seam of metal that, left exposed, will corrode and result in the damage spreading as the metal is slowly eaten away. Corrugated metal roofs are susceptible as they are cut and the edges never receive protection, meaning when cut-edge corrosion begins, it is important to treat it as soon as possible. In certain instances, roof sheets need to be removed and replaced, which is extremely expensive.

Metals seams are often neglected and can develop cut-edge corrosion

Metals seams are often neglected and can develop cut-edge corrosion.

Other Forms of Damage
Lastly, roofs are susceptible to various forms of damage in the immediate and long term. Long-term damage will generally arise if roofing is left unmaintained, to suffer from aging and neglect. A key example of this type of damage involves single-ply roof coverings. Over time, rubber roofing materials are subjected to the environment and constant UV exposure. Once again, over this period the material expands and contracts, becoming brittle and losing its former flexibility, making it prone to cracking.

In addition to weathering, wildlife can have a detrimental effect on roofing materials, as bird litter can chemically attack the plastic coating on some roofing systems. High levels can cause damage and subsequent deterioration of the lining, which can potentially lead to leaks or exposure of metal to corrosion.

With regard to immediate damage, working on roofs is also a common way in which damage can occur. As highlighted before, one of the key selling points of flat roofs is the ability to carry out maintenance and inspection easily. Whether it derives from maintenance or rooftop developments, such as HVAC installation, extensions or rooftop fire escapes, the foot traffic over flat roofs can lead to immediate damage of the roofing substrate, through piercing and general wear.

Over time, rubber roofing materials can become brittle and crack

Over time, rubber roofing materials can become brittle and crack.

Eliminating the Troublesome 10 Percent

For the majority of these problems, it is possible to find a repair solution. However, when left without treatment, the roof can become too damaged to refurbish, leaving costly replacement as the only option. Repair methods have evolved significantly over the years and eliminating the troublesome 10 percent is becoming far easier to do since the advent of liquid and cold-applied technologies. Not only does this signify a breaking of tradition, but crucially highlights the evolution of roofing maintenance materials.

PHOTOS: Belzona

CertainTeed Roofing Product Data is Available on ARCOM Software Platforms for Roofing Professionals

CertainTeed and ARCOM are pleased to announce that CertainTeed’s roofing product data and customized specifications are now available through ARCOM’s software platforms to architects, engineers and design professionals.
 
ARCOM and CertainTeed have worked together to create customized versions of the MasterSpec sections to accurately specify CertainTeed’s roofing product portfolio. Along with these specification sections, CertainTeed’s entire roofing product catalog and data sheets are accessible to specifiers when working on their projects.
 
“We are proud to partner with ARCOM in providing customized roofing specifications for both our Flintlastic Modified Bitumen roof systems and our complete collection of asphalt roofing shingle products,” said Tom Smith, president of CertainTeed Roofing. “These editable, 3-part specifications enable the roof designer to easily produce complete and accurate specifications for both low-slope and steep-slope roofing systems.”
 
ARCOM and CertainTeed believe this relationship will benefit design professionals as they select and specify roofing products.

Reduce Roof Temperatures by as Much as 20 Percent

CertainTeed has strengthened its highly reflective, low-slope CoolStar roofing products with an enhanced ceramic granule surface.

CertainTeed has strengthened its highly reflective, low-slope CoolStar roofing products with an enhanced ceramic granule surface.

CertainTeed has strengthened its highly reflective, low-slope CoolStar roofing products with an enhanced ceramic granule surface. The granulated, uncoated finish is designed to be a cost-effective way to lower commercial building energy consumption and increase occupant comfort. It handles like a standard roofing product without special installation requirements, is more aesthetically pleasing, and yet maintains a high solar reflectivity, reducing roof temperatures as much as 20 percent.

CoolStar products meet ENERGY STAR and California Title 24 requirements. CoolStar also qualifies for LEED points and meets NAHB National Green Building Standards.

CoolStar is designed to work with a wide range of roof systems, including built-up roofing, SBS, APP and self-adhering modified bitumen. It is extremely flexible and durable, because of the layering of high-quality reinforcements, heavy asphalt coating and highly reflective ceramic granules. This toughness combats the negative effects of natural expansion and contraction caused by heating, cooling, light and moisture. In addition, the brilliant white CoolStar surface is factory applied for hassle-free, one-step installation, which helps reduce labor costs.

NRCA Releases The NRCA Roofing Manual: Membrane Roof Systems—2015

NRCA has released <em>The NRCA Roofing Manual: Membrane Roof Systems—2015</em>.

NRCA has released The NRCA Roofing Manual: Membrane Roof Systems—2015.

NRCA has released The NRCA Roofing Manual: Membrane Roof Systems—2015. The new volume updates the 2011 volume under the same title, serving as a reference for contractors, architects and roof consultants. The 2015 manual provides best industry practices and technical information about the design, materials and installation techniques applicable to membrane roof systems used in low-slope applications. In addition, the manual includes information about roof decks, air and vapor retarders, rigid board insulation, roof membranes, fasteners, surfacing, accessories, roof system configurations and roof recoverings. It also will assist in proper product and material selection. The 2015 manual and boxed set may be purchased online.

Projects: Education

University of Virginia, Rotunda, Charlottesville

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819.

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819.

TEAM

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: W.A. Lynch Roofing, Charlottesville
ARCHITECT: John G. Waite Associates, Albany, N.Y.
JOINT-VENTURE BUILDER: Christman-Gilbane, Reston, Va., ChristmanCo.com and GilbaneCo.com
LEAD-ABATEMENT CONTRACTOR: Special Renovations Inc., Chesterfield, Va.

ROOF MATERIALS

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper. W.A. Lynch Roofing sheared 4,000 individual tiles to approximate dimensions in its sheet-metal shop, and a makeshift sheet-metal shop was set up on top of the scaffolding to complete the final measurements and exact cuts.

COPPER SUPPLIER: N.B. Handy Co., Lynchburg, Va.
COPPER MANUFACTURER: Hussey Copper, Leetsdale, Pa.

ROOF REPORT

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819. Jefferson modeled his design—presented to the university board in 1821—after the Pantheon in Rome. Although he died in 1826 while the Rotunda was still under construction, the stunning building housed the university’s library as Jefferson envisioned.

The rotunda renovation is a two-phase project, and roofing work was part of Phase 1. The roofing team believed seven months was adequate to complete the job; the university, however, requested it be complete by April 2013 so scaffolding would be removed in time for the commencement ceremony. That gave the team a four-month timeline.

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper.

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper.

Tom McGraw, executive vice president of W.A. Lynch Roofing, explains: “This was just short of impossible even if it wasn’t winter. But as a graduate of UVA, I recognized the basis of the request and agreed to it. So we doubled the manpower and went to a 10-hour day, seven-day a week schedule. We divided the roof into four equal quadrants, each separated by an expansion joint and put a crew in each area working simultaneously with the other three. We also added support personnel in our sheet-metal shop, as well as runners to keep the flow of material to the job site on schedule for the sheet-metal mechanics. In the final analysis, we made the schedule and completed our work within the owner’s request.”

The roofing project was essential because of rust on the previous terne-coated metal roof. It was determined the rust was caused by inadequate roof ventilation that created condensation on the underside of the metal roofing. Ventilation was lacking because of a Guastavino tile dome that was installed in 1895. The condensation was addressed by installing a concealed venting system at the intersections of the treads and risers at the seven steps in the roof, as well as at the top of the dome below the oculus. “Heated air has low density so it will logically rise creating natural convection,” McGraw notes. “This convection creates air movement below the roof and minimizes dead air spaces and the potential for condensation. The key to this is ensuring that you size the ‘intake’ venting similar to the ‘exhaust’ venting so that air will flow in an unrestricted fashion.”

Reroofing a dome can be a challenge, and determining how to keep the interior and its priceless valuables dry required some ingenuity. McGraw invented a tarp that he compares to a hooped skirt to keep the space watertight. The roofing crew cut trapezoidal sections of EPDM membrane and installed them from the bottom to the top of the dome. This skirt-like tarp was configured out of eight pieces at the bottom, six at the midpoint and four at the top. The maximum cut sizes for each level were determined using a computer drawing. Creating the EPDM covering in sections made the tarp easy to handle and remove. “If we seamed it all together or made it in less pieces, the guys wouldn’t have been able to lift it,” McGraw adds.

The tear-off process involved removing the painted metal panels according to lead-abatement standards; the panels were cleaned offsite to maintain the integrity and safety of the job site. A new wood deck was installed on furring over the tiles. This was covered with 30-pound roofing felt and red rosin building paper followed by the new copper roof.

Each piece of copper was tinned and folded before being installed. This process was necessary because of the lack of symmetry on the building. McGraw recalls: “Because this building is almost 200-years old, you have to recognize that not everything is as true and square as one might hope. There are seven steps that circle the base of the dome, and each tread and riser changed in height and width all the way around the building.”

This is the fourth roof for the Rotunda. The first was a tin-plate roof designed by Thomas Jefferson; the second was copper that was a replacement roof after a fire in 1895; the third roof was painted terne-coated steel from 1976; and the current roof is 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper that will be painted white. The decision to select copper was based on cost, durability and historic appearance.

Phase 2 of the project began in May, and the Rotunda will be closed for repairs until 2016. At a price of $42.5 million, utility, fire protection and mechanical upgrades will be made, as well as a Dome Room ceiling replacement and construction of a new underground service vault. The roof also will be painted white, and leaking gutters will be repaired during this phase.

PHOTOS: DAN GROGAN PHOTOGRAPHY

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The Stars Align as Waukegan Roofing Celebrates 100 Years in Business

Waukegan Roofing Co. Inc., Waukegan, Ill., is celebrating 100 years in business in 2014.

Waukegan Roofing Co. Inc., Waukegan, Ill., is celebrating 100 years in business in 2014.

The universe seems to be telling Bruce Diederich he is following the right path. Diederich is president of Waukegan Roofing Co. Inc., located in Waukegan, Ill., a suburb 32-miles north of Chicago. As the roofing-contracting firm enters its 100th year in business, it’s difficult to ignore the coincidences Diederich, who has owned the company for 16 years, has uncovered while researching Waukegan Roofing’s long history.

One hundred years ago, M.C. DeThorne established Waukegan Roofing on Philippa Avenue in Waukegan. Although Waukegan Roofing no longer is located on Philippa Avenue, Diederich is grooming his son Philip to someday take over the business. Strange? It gets better: DeThorne included his company’s telephone number—1625—on advertisements discovered by a local historian. Today, Waukegan Roofing’s phone number is (847) 623-1625.

An early location of Waukegan Roofing.

An early location of Waukegan Roofing.

If that isn’t enough, it seems as though Diederich was always meant to own a roofing business. His father owned a shingles-only roofing-contracting firm for 32 years. While he was growing up, Diederich worked for the company but opted to sell roofing materials instead and went to work for Bradco Supply, now Beloit, Wis.-based ABC Supply Co. Inc. Diederich happened to sell materials to Waukegan Roofing, which at that time was owned by Ed and Dave Hiner. The Hiners’ father had bought Waukegan Roofing from the DeThorne family in 1951. When Ed Hiner mentioned in 1998 they were planning to retire, Diederich pulled $5 out of his pocket and jokingly told Ed not to sell before he could speak to his youngest brother who was interested in returning to roofing. The next day Dave Hiner invited Diederich for coffee.

“We were parked next to each other and Dave opened his trunk and said, ‘Ed and I want you to buy our company. Here are the last 10 years of financials,’” Diederich recalls. “I put them in my car and called my wife, telling her she’d never believe what just occurred. She thought they were really serious and urged me to call our attorney and accountant. Thirty days later, I owned Waukegan Roofing.”

Owner Bruce Diederich credits his 55 union employees with his company’s success.

Owner Bruce Diederich credits his 55 union employees with his company’s success.

The Hiners had followed DeThorne’s lead and focused their business on low-slope commercial and industrial roofs. Diederich realized he could offer his shingle heritage to the business. “I looked around and there were all these retail centers being built and they all had a shingle-mansard roof of some form,” he says. “I approached Waukegan Roofing’s top-five contracts and asked what they thought about me starting a shingle division. Every one of them said it would be a great idea because they could come to Waukegan Roofing for everything, not just the flat part of the roof.”

Waukegan Roofing’s shingle division has been very successful since Diederich established it in 1998. Today, the firm constructs all types of low- and steep-slope roofs, along with roof-related sheet metal. In addition, in 2007, Diederich started a commercial service and maintenance division, which kept Waukegan Roofing busy through the economic downturn and benefitted the company’s growth overall.

Waukegan Roofing constructs all types of low- and steep-slope roofs, along with roof-related sheet metal, as well as operates a commercial service and maintenance division.

Waukegan Roofing constructs all types of low- and steep-slope roofs, along with roof-related sheet metal, as well as operates a commercial service and maintenance division.

Diederich credits his 55 union employees with his company’s success. “We stick by them through thick and thin,” he says. “We just believe in the people who work for the firm and in the quality of the product we put out. Our motto is ‘Installing roofs you can rely on’, and we believe in that wholeheartedly.”

All the clues that Diederich’s chosen profession was meant to be are there, and he agrees his life has come full circle—from working in his dad’s roofing business to helming a successful roofing contracting company of his own into its 100th year. “People ask me whether I regret buying a roofing company and I say, ‘Yeah, I wish I would’ve done it 10 years earlier’,” he chuckles.

INVOLVEMENT

Bruce Diederich is immediate past president of the Chicago Roofing Contractors Association. He also is an active member of the Midwest Roofing Contractors Association and National Roofing Contractors Association.

Rooftop Equipment Mounting and Penetrations for Low-slope Standing-seam Metal Roofs

Standing-seam metal roofing offers a durable, sustainable alternative to other roof types and can provide maintenance-free service for five to 10 decades. Sadly, this exceptional lifespan often is sabotaged with the mounting of essential rooftop equipment and ancillary mechanicals.

Metal roofing can make use of special seam-clamping hardware that grips the standing seam without puncturing the membrane. Seam clamps have made metal roofing a preferred roof type for mounting photovoltaic solar arrays. PHOTO: Metal Roof Advisory Group Ltd.

Metal roofing can make use of special seam-clamping hardware that grips the standing seam without puncturing the membrane. Seam clamps have made metal roofing a preferred roof type for mounting photovoltaic solar arrays.

Regardless of the roof type involved, consultants generally agree that the best way to prevent roof-related problems is to clear the rooftop of everything possible and just let it function as a roof—not a mechanical equipment platform. However, such a perfect roof continues to elude us, as it becomes necessary or convenient to mount HVAC equipment, screens to hide it, piping to fuel it, scuttles to access it and walkways to service it. The list of rooftop mountings also may include plumbing vents, satellite dishes, lightning protection, snow retention systems, solar collectors, advertising signage and fall-protection systems to maintain all the foregoing. To help achieve relatively trouble-free roofs, this segment provides some basic understanding of the dos and don’ts in situations where rooftop equipment mounting is requisite.

Penetration-free Attachment

A good “first rule” about any rooftop mounting is to avoid penetrating the membrane whenever possible. While this may seem obvious, the tenet is often violated with standing-seam metal. The norm for attaching things seems to involve anchoring the item to the structure through the roof. When this happens, it not only threatens weather integrity, but can also violate the membrane’s thermal-cycling behavior by inadvertently pinning the panel to the structure. Such a point of attachment will fatigue and fail from forces of thermal expansion within a short time. Fortunately, scores of items and equipment can be securely mounted to metal rooftops without any penetration whatsoever, actually making metal roofing more user-friendly than other roof types.

In terms of mounting ancillaries, metal roofing can use special seam-clamping hardware that grips the standing seam without puncturing the membrane. Unlike many other types of roofing, metal is a rigid, high-tensile material. The seam area creates a beam-like structure that can provide convenient anchorage for walkways, solar arrays, condensing units and gas piping without harming the roof’s weathering characteristics. Mechanicals can be safely and cost-effectively secured to these seam clamps, leaving the roof membrane penetration free. Seam clamps can provide holding strength of up to several thousand pounds on some profiles and gauges, last the life of the roof and preserve thermal-cycling characteristics. Using seam clamps when possible for ancillary mounting will eliminate unwanted holes and other potential problems.

Seam clamps allow even cumbersome ancillary items to be attached to metal roofs without penetrating the rooftop. PHOTO: Metal Roof Advisory Group Ltd.

Seam clamps allow even cumbersome ancillary items to be attached to metal roofs without penetrating the rooftop.

Clamps should be made only of noncorrosive metals—typically, aluminum with stainless-steel mounting hardware. These metals are compatible with virtually anything found on a metal roof, except copper (with which there are dissimilar metallurgy issues). Dissimilar metals in electrolytic contact will induce galvanic corrosion of the less noble metal. In cases involving copper roofing, brass clamps should be used with stainless-steel hardware.

Seam clamps generally integrate with the profile and seam folding, and in some way “pinch” the seam material to anchor them in place. Preferred methods of doing this involve setscrews tightened against the seam causing a detent in the seam material that in turn creates a mechanical interlock of the setscrew, seam and clamp, providing the greatest holding strength and durability. Setscrews should have round, polished points to prevent galling metallic coatings, which can lead to corrosion. In like fashion, and regardless of the method of engagement, any clamp device should avoid any sharp points or nodes that could potentially pierce or gall metallic coatings of steel or cause fatigue and fracture points of other metals.

It also is important to remember that any loads introduced into the clamp will be transferred to the panels and their anchorage to the structure. Consequently, anchorage must be capable of withstanding the added load. The best practice is to utilize clamps that have been appropriately tested for material and seam-specific holding strength; be sure in-service load does not exceed that of the published holding strength, including factors of safety. The roof manufacturer should also be consulted with respect to approval of devices used.

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Mule-Hide Redesigns Website

Mule-Hide Products has launched its newly redesigned website, mulehide.com, which makes it easier for contractors, architects, building owners, facility managers, modular manufacturers/dealers, and distributors to find the product and system information they need. It also offers a variety of user-friendly tools designed to help warranty-eligible contractors manage their Mule-Hide-warranted jobs.