ARMA’s Newest eBook Provides Guidance for Installing Three-Tab Asphalt Shingles

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) has converted its popular manual, a Good Application Makes A Good Roof Better: A Simplified Guide – Installing Three-Tab Asphalt Shingles For Maximum Life & Weather Protection, into an eBook, making it easier for contractors to access it on the jobsite.

ARMA’s Good Application Guide serves as a resource for roofing professionals installing three-tab asphalt shingles, including for new-roof construction, reroofing/roof replacement and roof recovery projects.

The recently updated guide also includes special procedures for both low and steep-slope roofing systems, proper attic ventilation, ice dam protection, correct nailing methods, roof deck preparation, hip and ridge application, and underlayment, drip edge and flashing installation. As with all technical guidance, installers should also follow manufacturer’s recommended installation instructions. View a preview of the guide by clicking here.

“Three-tab shingles come in a variety of colors, styles and textures, but like with any asphalt roofing system, they have to be properly installed in order to achieve the best performance,” said Tim McQuillen, ARMA’s director of technical services, a 25-year building products industry veteran. “By converting the Good Application Guide: Three-Tab Shingles into an eBook, we can ensure contractors can access expert asphalt roofing installation techniques directly on their smartphone or tablet.”

The Good Application Guide: Three-Tab Shingles is available for $9.95 as a print-on-demand copy or $8.95 as an eBook from the ARMA Bookstore. It is also sold on other prominent digital platforms such as Amazon’s Kindle Store, Kobo, Barnes and Nobles’ Nook, Apple’s iBookstore and the Google Play store. To purchase the guide, visit www.asphaltroofing.org/arma-bookstore.

ARMA also offers several other technical publications for both residential and commercial asphalt roofing applications. They are available for purchase as print-on-demand and eBooks, and include the Good Application Makes a Good Roof Better – A Simplified Guide: Installing Laminated Asphalt Shingles for Maximum Life & Weather Protection, the Modified Bitumen Design Guide for Building Owners, and the Residential Asphalt Roofing Manual – Design and Application Methods.

For more information visit www.asphaltroofing.org

ABC Supply Offers Building Products to Contractors at the Bowling Green Branch

ABC Supply Co. Inc. has opened a branch in Bowling Green, Ky., located at 125 Hunter Court. The location will offer steep-slope and low-slope roofing and other select building products that contractors need to run their businesses.

Jason Swigart will manage the branch. Prior to joining ABC Supply, Swigart worked for other building products distributors in the Louisville area in positions ranging from inside and outside sales to operations manager. In March 2016, he started at the Louisville branch located at 619 Industry Road as an outside sales associate. He graduated from the University of Louisville with a bachelor’s degree in business administration and marketing.

This is ABC Supply’s sixth location in Kentucky. “Our new location in Bowling Green will help contractors in south-central Kentucky have access to the products and services that they rely on for their businesses every day,” says Tom Kuchan, vice president of ABC Supply’s Northeast Region. “Whether it’s working with new or existing customers, Jason and his team look forward to continuing to build relationships with the area’s contractors.” 

Branch hours are 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. CDT, Monday through Friday and 7 a.m. to 11 a.m. CDT on Saturday. The phone number is (270) 782-8787. 

Insulation Alternative Receives Patent

Rich-E-Board provides an insulation alternative for the commercial roofing market.

Rich-E-Board provides an insulation alternative for the commercial roofing market.

Rich-E-Board is an insulated composite panel system created by R-50 Systems to provide an insulation alternative for the commercial roofing market. While conventional insulation requires a thickness of 15 inches to reach an R-value of 50, Rich-E-Board achieves the same result at just 1 1/2-inches thick. Rich-E-Board can be installed on most roof deck types and can support all conventional low-slope roof systems. The product recently received a patent for its proprietary Vacuum Insulated Panel—two polymeric foam cover boards that sandwich the panel—and the adhesive ribbons that bind the boards and panel together. Rich-E-Board is cut-to-spec and lightweight, as well as mold and fire resistant.

ASTM Test Method Prevents Air Leakage, Supports Liquid-applied Polymers

A new ASTM International test method aims to prevent air leakage in and around roofs, helping improve energy efficiency, reduce moisture problems and prevent pollutants from entering a building.

“It is critical that each assembly of the building envelope be investigated for air-leakage performance with appropriate standards,” says ASTM Member Sudhakar Molleti. “What cannot be captured in the material and full envelope air leakage testing—the structural strength and continuity of the air barrier assembly—can be quantified in the assembly testing. To achieve energy efficiency of building and to adapt for climate change, comprehensive data of material, assembly, and full envelope air leakage testing are needed. By quantifying air leakage in roof assemblies, this new standard can serve as a platform for supporting code compliance and for constructing energy-efficient and sustainable roof assemblies.”

Molleti, a research officer with more than 10 years of roof assembly testing at the National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, notes roofing membranes are air impermeable but can be compromised by factors, such as lack of continuity of the membrane seams, improper detailing around rooftop preparations, improper selection of flashing materials and improper connection of roof membranes to the exterior wall barrier.

Specifically, this new test method is a laboratory technique to determine air leakage in low-slope membrane roof assemblies and accounts for the wind fatigue expected during the life span of a roof by simulating negative air-pressure differences.

The new standard (soon to be published as D8052/D0852M, “Test Method for Quantification of Air Leakage in Low Sloped Membrane Roof Assemblies”) was developed by ASTM’s committee on roofing and waterproofing (D08).

In other news, a set of proposed ASTM International test methods will help support the growing number of roofing projects that use liquid-applied polymers. The proposed standard (WK40123, “Test Methods for Sampling and Testing Liquid Applied Polymeric Roofing and Waterproofing Membranes that Are Directly Exposed to Weather”) will help manufacturers; testing labs; and the construction industry as they sample, test and compare products. It is being developed by ASTM’s committee on roofing and waterproofing (D08).

The proposed standard includes ways to test liquid-applied polymeric materials that are cured to form roofing and waterproofing membranes that are directly exposed to all kinds of weather. By their nature, these materials are seamless. They are also useful when working with complex surfaces and custom-fit projects.

ASTM Member Philip Moser notes these membranes have been traditionally used for waterproofing of elevated parking decks, but their use for applications like roofing is quickly rising. Moser, a senior project manager specializing in building technology at Boston-based Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc., says, “Delivery to the exact point of application in relatively small containers makes these products particularly attractive for small rooftop terraces, congested urban areas and roofs that are not accessible by crane where delivery of larger containers would create logistical problems.”

The test methods would be used by manufacturers and testing labs, as well as the people who write specifications that indicate which test methods should be used to evaluate physical properties.

To purchase standards, visit ASTM. org and search by the standard designation, or contact ASTM Customer Relations at (877) 909-ASTM or Sales@ASTM.org. ASTM welcomes participation in the development of its standards. Become a member at ASTM. org/JOIN.

Cap Sheet Reflects Ultraviolet Rays, Absorbs Less Heat

The RCap Plus cap sheet features reflective white granules embedded into the membrane to reflect ultraviolet rays and absorb less heat.

The RCap Plus cap sheet features reflective white granules embedded into the membrane to reflect ultraviolet rays and absorb less heat.

Malarkey Roofing Products has introduced the RCap Plus cap sheet for low slope, commercial roofing systems. It features reflective white granules embedded into the membrane to reflect ultraviolet rays and absorb less heat.

RCap Plus utilizes ground and packed granules, and these granules ensure more coverage in the membrane per square. Malarkey grinds the asphalt granules at its South Gate, Calif., manufacturing facility.

The solar reflectivity and limited heat absorption of the RCap Plus cap sheet are key design features of the product. RCap Plus meets CEC Title 24, Part 6 standards and has an initial Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) rating of 87. As part of a roof system, RCap Plus may help decrease energy costs used to cool the building and extend roof service life.

NRCA Releases 2015-16 Market Survey

NRCA has released its 2015-16 market survey, providing information about overall sales-volume trends in the roofing industry, roofing experiences, material usage and regional breakdowns. It is an important tool to measure the scope of the U.S. roofing industry, and the data provides a glimpse into which roof systems are trending in the low- and steep-slope roofing markets.

This year’s survey reports sales volumes for 2015 and 2016 projections averaged between $8 million and almost $9 million, respectively, and revealed a near-steady ratio of low- to steep-slope sales of 74 percent to 26 percent.

For low-slope roofs, TPO remains the market leader with a 40 percent share of the new construction market and 30 percent of the reroofing market for 2015. Asphalt shingles continue to dominate the steep-slope roofing market with a 47 percent market share for new construction and a 59 percent share for reroofing.

Polyisocyanurate insulation continues to lead its sector of the market with 80 percent of new construction and 73 percent of reroofing work. In addition, roof cover board installation for 2015 was reported as 22 percent in new construction, 42 percent in reroofing tear-offs and 36 percent in re-cover projects.

NRCA’s market survey enables roofing contractors to compare their material usage with contractors in other regions and provides manufacturers and distributors with data to analyze, which can affect future business decisions.

NRCA members may download a free electronic copy of the 2016 survey.

Roofing Problem Areas

Flat roofs are prone to ponding water.

Flat roofs are prone to ponding water.

Facilities maintenance issues can have a major impact on productivity in industrial and commercial environments with something as small as a leaking roof causing significant disruption and downtime. Years of experience suggest that 90 percent of the problems we are presented with today will arise from a mere 10 percent of the roof’s total area. But are some roof types and roof areas more susceptible to damage than others? Moreover, how do these roofing problems arise and how can they be categorized?

Flat Roofs

Flat roofs are commonly chosen for industrial and commercial buildings, covering the vast majority of offices, factories and warehouses around the globe. However, despite their popularity, my firm’s experience indicates that the bulk of roofing applications owe to the failings of flat roofs. This begs the question; do the benefits of flat roofs outweigh the disadvantages?

Currently, the flat roofing market is in a particularly healthy state. It is easy to see why because flat roofs do in fact offer a great deal of advantages. Notably, they are a low-cost option for many projects, being easier and more economical to install, inspect and maintain. Therefore, they prove highly popular with many commercial facilities and industrial buildings.

However, flat roofs are historically problematic, suffering from an array of issues commonly arising from standing water and traditional roofing materials. Pooling of water on roofs can be attributed to inadequate roofing materials or, strangely, a roof being “too flat”. Flat roofs should actually feature a small gradient to allow sufficient rainwater run-off; otherwise, the weight of water pooling can lead to deflection and numerous subsequent issues.

Roof flashings can prove problematic due to dissimilar materials.

Roof flashings can prove problematic due to dissimilar materials.

Of course, other roof variations, such as pitched or slanted roofs, will offer their own range of complications; however, complications with pooling water are not among these. This distinct disadvantage is one of several that can lead to serious problems within that troublesome 10 percent. The most common problems can be split into three separate categories.

Dissimilar Materials
Most roofs form a veritable patchwork of materials, including anything from glass and plastics to masonry and metals. Industrial roofs can be particularly troublesome as they boast a multitude of pipes, heating units and other protrusions that make the roof geometry complex to cover effectively. Whatever the combination of roofing materials is, ensuring long-term adhesion and sealing between all these dissimilar materials is crucial—and can prove problematic.

Flashings fall into this category and are a common fixture of flat and pitched roofs, where metal, brick and felt or bitumen can often all meet. Exposed to varying temperatures and weather conditions, these materials can act differently, altering shape and size dependent upon that material’s characteristics. This can result in roofing weakness due to different expansion and contraction rates of the materials, allowing for water ingress through developing gaps. Moreover, this category includes areas where two metals may meet. Dissimilar metals exposed to continuous weathering can potentially lead to galvanic corrosion, which deteriorates the roof’s protection, loosening the materials and once again leading to issues like leaking.

Joints and Seams
Joints and seams spell considerable trouble for many roofs, predominantly due to the effects of movement. All buildings will feature a degree of movement as a result of thermal expansion, contraction and wind, making joints and seams one of the most vulnerable areas. Resulting gaps or lips can be created, increased further by wind uplift, which may allow water ingress or exposure of unprotected materials to corrosion and weathering.

Seams around skylights and roof protrusions can cause roof vulnerabilities.

Seams around skylights and roof protrusions can cause roof vulnerabilities.

Found whenever two materials meet, joints and seams are a common sight on industrial roofs and one that occurs frequently on roofs covered using traditional materials. For instance, felt or bitumen surfaces are layered in strips and require heat to fuse them together and create one barrier of protection. However, continuous exposure to the elements can lead to delamination of the roofing material, creating areas of vulnerability, such as lips.

Similarly, parapet walls can also become vulnerable at the joints, normally caused by movement between the brickwork. This can develop through movement in the building or perhaps vegetation forcing through the joint, widening any gaps further and causing moisture ingress. Furthermore, this problem is shared by the seams around skylights and glazing bars, which degrade over time due to the dissimilar materials present and associated movement.

Unlike other problem areas in this category, cut-edge corrosion does not stem from two materials meeting. In fact, it falls into this category as it is an uncoated seam of metal that, left exposed, will corrode and result in the damage spreading as the metal is slowly eaten away. Corrugated metal roofs are susceptible as they are cut and the edges never receive protection, meaning when cut-edge corrosion begins, it is important to treat it as soon as possible. In certain instances, roof sheets need to be removed and replaced, which is extremely expensive.

Metals seams are often neglected and can develop cut-edge corrosion

Metals seams are often neglected and can develop cut-edge corrosion.

Other Forms of Damage
Lastly, roofs are susceptible to various forms of damage in the immediate and long term. Long-term damage will generally arise if roofing is left unmaintained, to suffer from aging and neglect. A key example of this type of damage involves single-ply roof coverings. Over time, rubber roofing materials are subjected to the environment and constant UV exposure. Once again, over this period the material expands and contracts, becoming brittle and losing its former flexibility, making it prone to cracking.

In addition to weathering, wildlife can have a detrimental effect on roofing materials, as bird litter can chemically attack the plastic coating on some roofing systems. High levels can cause damage and subsequent deterioration of the lining, which can potentially lead to leaks or exposure of metal to corrosion.

With regard to immediate damage, working on roofs is also a common way in which damage can occur. As highlighted before, one of the key selling points of flat roofs is the ability to carry out maintenance and inspection easily. Whether it derives from maintenance or rooftop developments, such as HVAC installation, extensions or rooftop fire escapes, the foot traffic over flat roofs can lead to immediate damage of the roofing substrate, through piercing and general wear.

Over time, rubber roofing materials can become brittle and crack

Over time, rubber roofing materials can become brittle and crack.

Eliminating the Troublesome 10 Percent

For the majority of these problems, it is possible to find a repair solution. However, when left without treatment, the roof can become too damaged to refurbish, leaving costly replacement as the only option. Repair methods have evolved significantly over the years and eliminating the troublesome 10 percent is becoming far easier to do since the advent of liquid and cold-applied technologies. Not only does this signify a breaking of tradition, but crucially highlights the evolution of roofing maintenance materials.

PHOTOS: Belzona

CertainTeed Roofing Product Data is Available on ARCOM Software Platforms for Roofing Professionals

CertainTeed and ARCOM are pleased to announce that CertainTeed’s roofing product data and customized specifications are now available through ARCOM’s software platforms to architects, engineers and design professionals.
 
ARCOM and CertainTeed have worked together to create customized versions of the MasterSpec sections to accurately specify CertainTeed’s roofing product portfolio. Along with these specification sections, CertainTeed’s entire roofing product catalog and data sheets are accessible to specifiers when working on their projects.
 
“We are proud to partner with ARCOM in providing customized roofing specifications for both our Flintlastic Modified Bitumen roof systems and our complete collection of asphalt roofing shingle products,” said Tom Smith, president of CertainTeed Roofing. “These editable, 3-part specifications enable the roof designer to easily produce complete and accurate specifications for both low-slope and steep-slope roofing systems.”
 
ARCOM and CertainTeed believe this relationship will benefit design professionals as they select and specify roofing products.

Reduce Roof Temperatures by as Much as 20 Percent

CertainTeed has strengthened its highly reflective, low-slope CoolStar roofing products with an enhanced ceramic granule surface.

CertainTeed has strengthened its highly reflective, low-slope CoolStar roofing products with an enhanced ceramic granule surface.

CertainTeed has strengthened its highly reflective, low-slope CoolStar roofing products with an enhanced ceramic granule surface. The granulated, uncoated finish is designed to be a cost-effective way to lower commercial building energy consumption and increase occupant comfort. It handles like a standard roofing product without special installation requirements, is more aesthetically pleasing, and yet maintains a high solar reflectivity, reducing roof temperatures as much as 20 percent.

CoolStar products meet ENERGY STAR and California Title 24 requirements. CoolStar also qualifies for LEED points and meets NAHB National Green Building Standards.

CoolStar is designed to work with a wide range of roof systems, including built-up roofing, SBS, APP and self-adhering modified bitumen. It is extremely flexible and durable, because of the layering of high-quality reinforcements, heavy asphalt coating and highly reflective ceramic granules. This toughness combats the negative effects of natural expansion and contraction caused by heating, cooling, light and moisture. In addition, the brilliant white CoolStar surface is factory applied for hassle-free, one-step installation, which helps reduce labor costs.

NRCA Releases The NRCA Roofing Manual: Membrane Roof Systems—2015

NRCA has released <em>The NRCA Roofing Manual: Membrane Roof Systems—2015</em>.

NRCA has released The NRCA Roofing Manual: Membrane Roof Systems—2015.

NRCA has released The NRCA Roofing Manual: Membrane Roof Systems—2015. The new volume updates the 2011 volume under the same title, serving as a reference for contractors, architects and roof consultants. The 2015 manual provides best industry practices and technical information about the design, materials and installation techniques applicable to membrane roof systems used in low-slope applications. In addition, the manual includes information about roof decks, air and vapor retarders, rigid board insulation, roof membranes, fasteners, surfacing, accessories, roof system configurations and roof recoverings. It also will assist in proper product and material selection. The 2015 manual and boxed set may be purchased online.