Project Profiles: Education Facilities

Maury Hall, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Wagner Roofing, Hyattsville, Md.
General Contractor: C.E.R. Inc., Baltimore, (410) 247-9096

The project included 34 dormers that feature double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal.

The project included 34 dormers that feature double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal.

ROOF MATERIALS

Wagner Roofing was awarded the complete replacement of all roof systems. These included an upper double-lock standing-seam copper roof system, a bullnose copper cornice transition, slate mansard, 34 dormers with double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal, eight copper hip metal caps and a continuous built-in gutter with decorative copper fascia. Each of the dormers also had a copper window well.

The upper standing-seam roof was removed and replaced with 24-inch-wide, 20-ounce copper coil rollformed into 1-inch-high by 21-inch-wide continuous standing-seam panels that matched the original profile. The eave bullnose, which also served as the mansard flashing, was removed and returned to Wagner Roofing’s shop where it was replicated to match the exact size and profile.

The 34 dormer roofs were replaced with 20-inch-wide, 20-ounce copper coil formed into 1-inch-high by 17-inch- wide continuous standing-seam panels. The decorative ornate fascia of the dormers was carefully removed and Wagner’s skilled craftsmen used it as a template to develop the new two-piece copper cornice to which the roof panels locked. The cheeks and face of the dormers were also re-clad with custom-fabricated 20-ounce copper.

The oversized built-in-gutter at the base of the slate mansard was removed and replaced with a new 20-ounce copper liner custom-formed and soldered onsite. The replacement included a specialty “bull-nosed” drip edge at the base of the slate and an ornate, custom-formed fascia on the exterior of the built-in gutter. The decorative copper fascia included 85 “hubcaps”, 152 “half wheels” and 14 decorative pressed-copper miters. The original hubcap and half-wheel ornaments were broken down and patterns were replicated. Each ornamental piece was hand assembled from a pattern of 14 individual pieces of 20-ounce copper before being installed at their precise original location on the new fascia. The miters were made by six different molds, taken from the original worn pieces, to stamp the design into 20-ounce sheet copper.

In all, more than 43,000 pounds of 20-ounce copper was used on the project.

Copper Manufacturer: Revere Copper Products

ROOF REPORT

Maury Hall was built in 1907 and was designed by Ernest Flagg. Flagg designed many of the buildings at the U.S. Naval Academy, including the Chapel, Bancroft Hall, Mahan Hall, the superintendent’s residence and Sampson Hall. His career was largely influenced by his studies at École des Beaux-Arts, Paris. Examples of Flagg’s Beaux-Arts influence can be found in the decorative copper adorning the built-in gutter on building designs.

Maury Hall currently houses the departments of Weapons and Systems Engineering and Electrical Engineering. The building sits in a courtyard connected to Mahan Hall and across from its design twin, Sampson Hall.

PHOTO: Joe Guido

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Creating Visual Impact with Copper and Silver Roofing Membranes

Whether you’re re-roofing a historic building that needs to maintain its aesthetics or you’re working on a new roof construction that has to make a statement, there are many instances in which a building owner would want his or her roof to generate a specific architectural appeal. The most difficult part of this is balancing durability and beauty with cost. Roof systems today have evolved to solve this conundrum. Now, copper and silver synthetic PVC membranes are being used to achieve the desired appearance of a metal standing-seam roof at a fraction of the cost without sacrificing performance.

Alternatives to Metal Roof Systems

Michigan State University replaced the existing slate roof system with SOPREMA SENTINEL Copper Art to provide the desired appearance and required long-term performance.

Michigan State University replaced the existing slate roof system with SOPREMA SENTINEL Copper Art to provide the desired appearance and required long-term performance.


Copper and silver synthetic membranes are great cost-effective alternatives to metal roofs. As flexible synthetic systems, these roof membranes are economical and easy to install by conforming to complex geometries.

Certain synthetic PVC roof membranes on the market today are offered in a variety of colors, some of which can mimic the look of metal roofing. While these roof membranes offer the proven long-term performance of flexible polyvinyl chloride (PVC), they provide the metal appearance via the addition of pigments that can chalk or fade as the pigmented membrane ages, therefore losing the desired aesthetic feature.

Conversely, SOPREMA SENTINEL Copper and Silver Art PVC membranes incorporate copper or aluminum metallic powder into the PVC formulation, producing an enhanced metallic look. Unlike pigmented membranes, SENTINEL Copper Art provides the same weathering capabilities as traditional standing seam copper—the SENTINEL Copper Art will patina as a traditional copper roof would. Silver Art is unique because the color will not fade due to the addition of metallic powder, and its surface layer is factory embedded with an acrylic shield treatment to resist dirt pickup and chalking. Copper Art and Silver Art membranes provide the long-lasting aesthetic appearance and waterproofing abilities of a metal roof.

Applications for Copper and Silver Membranes

Copper and silver roof membranes are often used on buildings where aesthetics are important. Historic buildings, churches, schools, government buildings and army bases are a few examples of where this type of roof membrane has been installed. These buildings may require a particular appearance or designers may simply wish to update the appearance or provide some panache. Mansards or other areas of visible existing light-gauge metal roof systems may be present on these buildings and flexible copper and silver roof membranes may be used as an alternative aesthetic solution.

SENTINEL Silver Art met Glenside Public Library’s leak-free and architectural needs, plus the roofing contractor liked that the SENTINEL membrane was easy to install and looked great upon completion.

SENTINEL Silver Art met Glenside Public Library’s leak-free and architectural needs, plus the roofing contractor liked that the SENTINEL membrane was easy to install and looked great upon completion.

For example, since 2007, the slate roof of the Snyder-Phillips residence hall at Michigan State University had been leaking. The university needed to replace the existing slate roofing system with a new system that would meet the aesthetic requirements of the historic building. SOPREMA SENTINEL Copper Art was installed as a cap sheet to provide the desired appearance and the required long-term performance.

In addition, the Glenside Public Library had an existing standing-seam roof that was tied-in to a low-slope ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) roof. The tie-in between the two materials was problematic and continuously leaked. The library wanted to preserve the standing-seam appearance, but the noise created by wind and rain on the metal roof was a concern.

SOPREMA SENTINEL Silver Art was selected because it could provide the desired look while eliminating the tie-in issues between the steep- and low-slope roofing materials. SENTINEL Silver Art met the library’s leak-free and architectural needs, plus the roofing contractor liked that the SENTINEL membrane was easy to install and looked great upon completion. In addition to its aesthetic appeal, SENTINEL Silver Art also offered the benefit of significant noise reduction when compared to the former metal roof system.

Roofing Technology Advancements

As roofing technology advances, the options for creating a desired aesthetic have evolved. SENTINEL PVC Copper and Silver Art are high-performance roof membranes that provide the appearance of metal with the flexible, long-term performance of PVC, without the weight, expense or complexity of a traditional metal roof.

Carefully Select Roofing Materials to Maintain the Character of Historic Buildings

Selecting a historically appropriate roofing material is often restrictive as a simple matter of economy. Not everyone can afford a new slate roof. But individually landmarked structures and those in local historic districts are often monitored by historic district commissions (HDCs) that typically require property owners to replace in-kind or with an otherwise historically appropriate material.

Although the preference is replacement in-kind, an intelligent argument for an alternative can often be made. The HDC can consider other materials that were available at the time of construction, as well as what buildings of similar style in the community have on their roofs. A Queen Anne may have started with a polychromatic Vermont slate roof, but the commission can consider that nearby Queen Annes have monochromatic Monson slate or even cedar shingles. A Greek Revival may have a silver-coated tin roof, but few would argue with a homeowner willing to replace it with standing-seam copper. Let’s look at several American building styles and the materials used to roof them.

Colonial Styles, 1620 to 1780

From the New England Salt Box to the Dutch-vernacular homes of upstate New York, the earliest structures in the American colonies were roofed with wood shingles.

From the New England Salt Box to the Dutch-vernacular homes of upstate New York, the earliest structures in the American colonies were roofed with wood shingles.


From the New England Salt Box to the Dutch-vernacular homes of upstate New York, the earliest structures in the American colonies were roofed with wood shingles. It is a myth they were covered with hand-split shakes because these sometimes do not hold up well. Wood shingles were easily made by planing down the shakes to a uniform thickness for ease of installation.

In the Northeast, Eastern white cedar was the typical material used while cypress was often used in the South. Western red cedar was not used much in the eastern U.S. until after the 1850s and should not be considered appropriate on a circa-1820, Federal-style structure in Connecticut. Eastern white cedar, however, rarely lasts longer than 10 years in a roofing application. Instead, preservation architects now specify Alaskan yellow cedar. Predominantly distributed from British Columbia, this dense wood is favored because of its longevity and because it develops a silvery patina, like Eastern white cedar, within one year.

Federal and Neoclassical Styles, 1780 to 1820

Many of these buildings have low-slope roofs and are often obstructed by a balustrade that runs across the top of the eaves. In congested, urban environments, the roof may not even be visible from the street. This raises the obvious question: What needs to be done when an element of the exterior is not within the street view? Most HDCs use that standard question to limit their purview over a proposed alteration. If your roof falls into this category, then you should pick the most enduring and sustainable material you can afford.

These structures were not often originally covered in slate, though many are today. Original roofs were wooden shingles—less than ideal on a roof with a shallow pitch. In limited instances, standing-seam or flat-lock-seamed roofs are seen on these building styles. To find out what’s appropriate, check out roofs on structures of the same style in your neighborhood and neighboring communities.

The mansard roof is the character-defining feature of the Second Empire style. A mansard is essentially a hipped gambrel. The lower roof, between the eaves and upper cornice, is most often covered in slate.

The mansard roof is the character-defining feature of the Second Empire style. A mansard is essentially a hipped gambrel. The lower roof, between the eaves and upper cornice, is most often covered in slate.

Greek Revival, 1820-50

This style also features a low-slope roof, typically 4:12. Although the original roof material may have been wooden shingles, many of these roofs in the Northeast were replaced by a more sustainable material long ago. Flat-lock tin or terne-coated steel were typical from the late 1800s on. Because many of these structures also have box gutters at the eaves, keep in mind that relining these systems is costly and will need to tie in to the new roof material. (See “Traditional Gutter Systems in North America”, March/April issue, page 56, or bit.ly/1Mw7Qek.) It is not uncommon for an affordable membrane, like EPDM or TPO, to be used on the majority of the roof while a costlier appropriate material, like copper, covers the visible, projecting “porch” roof.

PHOTOS: Ward Hamilton

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