Insulated Metal Panels Save Time and Labor in Construction of Inmate Hospital

An insulated metal panel system from All Weather Insulated Panels was chosen for the project because of its durability, energy efficiency and ease of installation.

An insulated metal panel system from All Weather Insulated Panels was chosen for the project because of its durability, energy efficiency and ease of installation.

Under pressure from the federal government, the state of California had to build a new health care facility for its prison inmates—and do it fast. The logistics were daunting.

Planning for the 144-acre construction site that became the California Health Care Facility inmate hospital in Stockton, Calif., had to account for 1,700 personnel on the site at any one time. Physically, it was an imposing project: 23 buildings adding up to 1.2 million square feet, with 792,000 square feet of roofing.

Since there was very little space to store roofing material on site, it became clear in the planning stages that production had to be paced with installation, and a choreographed dance of trucks, forklifts, and installation crews had to be executed well in extremely compact areas.

That’s when using an insulated metal panel (IMP) system from All Weather Insulated Panels (AWIP) of Vacaville, Calif., dawned on the team at Roland Construction in Stockton.

The team realized using IMPs could save in both onsite manpower and installation time. “This being the largest project Roland has ever completed, as well as the demand for over 50 of our workers on site, plus personnel from other companies, the challenges were formidable,” said Jim Hoagland, the owner of Roland Construction.

Roof Materials

Representatives of Roland and the general contractor firm of Clark/McCarthy worked with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) prior to the bid date to make sure that the IMP roof system would be acceptable to the state. Not only was it deemed acceptable, the state considered IMPs an upgraded component in the final design-build package submitted for consideration. The specification was amended to include insulated metal panels for the architectural roofing before sub-contractors submitted bids.

After the bids were opened, Roland Construction and AWIP earned the opportunity. In January 2012, work began immediately on the design of the 23 buildings. AWIP’s 4-inch thick SR-2 standing seam insulated roof panel with a 22-gage outer skin coated in Natural Green Kynar paint became the choice. The excellent insulating properties of the sandwich-style panel with an R-value equal to 32 in the darker color complied with the project’s LEED Silver Certification.

Roof Report

In May 2012, three five-man crews began work on adding the insulated metal panels to the roof. It soon became apparent that each crew could install panels quickly, safely and efficiently.

Over the course of six months, each crew using a small crane could install up to 7,650 square feet of roofing, meaning 15 workers added a total of nearly 23,000 square feet of roofing per day. Following behind the roof paneling crews were several other crews installing AWIP 2-and-half-inch DM40 wall panels, flashings, and trim to encapsulate the 192 fixtures that allowed natural light into the buildings.

The California Health Care Facility in Stockton is comprised of 23 buildings on 144 acres. A total of 792,000 square feet of roofing was installed on the project.

The California Health Care Facility in Stockton is comprised of 23 buildings on 144 acres. A total of 792,000 square feet of roofing was installed on the project.


The use of a vacuum lifter provided by Automatic Panel Lifting System (APLS) of Auburn, Calif., proved essential in the installation of the panels. The APLS lifters are designed to be hung from a crane or forklift. With the proper attachment setup, they are capable of raising panels up to 60 feet long weighing approximately 600 pounds each.

With the panels being able to be lifted and released in a matter of seconds, production was increased dramatically to meet the project’s breakneck schedule.

With a total cost of $906 million, the project was California’s largest public works project in 2012. Hoagland points out that the reduction in installation man-hours not only saved schedule time, but more than made up for the additional material cost over a more traditional built-up insulation and metal roof system.

“With all the pre-planning with our supplier, AWIP, and their going the extra mile for us, we could not have accomplished this project in such an efficient and timely manner,” notes Hoagland. “The use of AWIP’s insulated metal roof panels for this project proved to be the decision that made this job feasible.”

Photos: All Weather Insulated Metal Panels

TEAM

GENERAL CONTRACTORS:
Clark/McCarthy—a joint venture of Clark Construction Co. and McCarthy Building Cos., in conjunction with Roland Construction, Stockton, Calif.

INSULATED METAL PANEL MANUFACTURER:
All Weather Insulated Panels, Vacaville, Calif.

AWIP Ready for 2020 Regulations in 2017

Insulated metal panels consist of closed-cell foam composite encased by two pieces of galvanized steel. AWIP’s SR2 roof panel has a trapezoidal design to increase the panel’s overall rigidity.

Insulated metal panels consist of closed-cell foam composite encased by two pieces of galvanized steel. AWIP’s SR2 roof panel has a trapezoidal design to increase the panel’s overall rigidity.

By 2020, as regulated by the California (CPUC) Public Utilities Commission, all new residential construction in California will have to meet Zero Net Energy (ZNE) requirements. In essence, the regulation stipulates that the amount of energy a residential building takes off the power grid must be balanced by energy the residence generates and returns to the grid.

William Lowery, the president of All Weather Insulated Metal Panels in Vacaville, California, says his company “is ready for 2020 in 2017.”

Lowery believes that insulated metal panels (IMPs)—the “sandwich-style” roofing component consisting of closed-cell foam composite encased by two pieces of galvanized steel—can propel the North American construction industry into a new era.

“Insulated metal panels are better, faster and cheaper, and we’re at the forefront of changing construction in the United States,” says Lowery.

As an example, AWIP’s SR2 roof panel has a trapezoidal design that increases the panel’s overall rigidity, making it safe for longer spans and foot traffic despite using a lighter-than-usual 26-gauge steel, which reduces overall weight.

Furthermore, according to Lowery, insulated metal panels require far less specialized equipment to install than traditional building materials and, due to their self-aligning, tongue-in-groove joinery, they are a snap to fit together. Once assembled, they provide insulating values above R-50, securing the building’s thermal envelope.

William Lowery, the president of All Weather Insulated Metal Panels, believes insulated metal panel systems can help California homeowners meet strict upcoming residential building regulations.

William Lowery, the president of All Weather Insulated Metal Panels, believes insulated metal panel systems can help California homeowners meet strict upcoming residential building regulations.

“The SR2, to name one, not only meets the new CPUC energy needs, its means a savings in needing fewer solar panels,” says Kim Harrell, vice president of sales for AWIP. “Roof panels reduce the cost of materials and construction time. They will play comply with the CPUC’s aspirations for California and have significant role in helping new and existing construction projects all over the country.”

Finally, AWIP’s SR2 roof panel with the S-5! Clips makes attaching solar panels quick and easy without piercing the underlying substrate, thereby preventing and air, vapor or water leakage.