New Construction Project Tests Contractor’s Mettle

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

Independence High School in Frisco, Texas, was conceived as an impressive new construction project on a tight schedule. The standing seam metal roof of the building was a key component in the architectural planning, as it was designed to provide aesthetic appeal for the massive structure while minimizing the view of mechanical equipment for passers-by on the ground.

The roof also was comprised of several low-slope sections, which were covered with a modified bitumen system. Both the metal and modified systems contributed to the building’s energy efficiency, helping the project achieve LEED Silver status.

The roof systems were installed by the Duncanville, Texas, branch of Progressive Roofing Services. Randy Dickhaut, the company’s general manager, indicated the project was completed in approximately one year—an ambitious schedule for a job of this size. “It was a challenging new construction job,” he says. “There were a lot of logistics involved, but in general, the job went very well.

A Tale of Two Roofs

The first goal of the project was drying in the metal decking. A two-ply, hot–mopped modified bitumen system manufactured by Johns Manville was installed on 24 decks totaling approximately 195,000 square feet of low-slope roof area. The system was applied over two layers of 2 1/2-inch polyiso insulation and 1/2-inch JM Securock cover board. The system was topped with an Energy-Star rated cap sheet, DynaGlas FR CR.

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

In the nine sections where the 88,000 square feet of metal roofing was installed, two layers of 2 1/2-inch polyiso insulation were attached, along with plywood decking and self-adhering TAMKO TW Tile and Metal underlayment. The standing seam metal roof system was manufactured by McElroy Metal, and the company provided the manpower and equipment to roll form the panels on the job site. Roof panels were the company’s 22-gauge Maxima 216 panels in Weathered Galvalume. These panels were complemented by 24-gauge Flush panels on walls and soffits.

The roll former was mounted on a scissor-lift truck. The eaves of the building were approximately 36 feet off of the ground, so a sacrificial panel was used to create a bridging effect to help guide panels to the roof. “Basically, the roll former went right along with us,” Dickhaut recalls. “We would pull 30 or 40 squares of panels, then drop the machine and move to the next spot. We were able to roll the panels right off the machine and lay them in almost the exact spot they would be installed.”

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

The length of some of the panels posed a challenge, and as many as 12 crew members were needed to guide them into place for installation. In the steep-slope sections, crew members had to be tied off 100 percent of the time, so retractable lanyards were used to help keep safety lines out of the way.

The roof was mechanically seamed using a self-propelled industrial roof seamer manufactured by D.I. Roof Seamers. “We call it walking the dog,” notes Dickhaut. “One man can operate the equipment, and he just walks it every inch of every seam.”

The metal roof was designed to hide the mechanical equipment for the building, and Progressive Roofing completed work on two deep mechanical wells before the HVAC equipment was installed. “In the wells, we used McElroy’s Flush panels for the vertical surfaces and transitioned to the metal roofing,” notes Dickhaut. “In the bottom of the mechanical wells, we installed the Johns Manville modified roof and flashed the curbs.”

Rising to the Challenge

Dickhaut points to a few challenges on the job, including the length of the panels and the weather. “Overall, the job went really well,” he says. “The architects did a great job on the design, and McElroy has really good details. It was a pretty straightforward process. There was a lot of wind and rain we had to cope with. When you have a 100-foot panel that you can’t kink or scratch, it can get kind of tricky. You just have to be very careful.”

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

Photos: Lynn Cromer Photography, Ferris, Texas

The Texas weather made the schedule unpredictable. “We were on that job over a year, so we caught all four seasons,” he says. “Weather had a huge impact. We dealt with extreme heat, humidity, snow, ice, mud, monsoon-type rains. Texas throws anything and everything at you.”

Whatever the conditions, Progressive Roofing was ready. “We show up locked and loaded,” Dickhaut says. “We attack it. We have seasoned veteran roofers that lead the pack. On that particular project, we had an architect, roofing consultants, an owner’s rep, and a general contractor. We would also bring in the McElroy and JM reps periodically for consultation. It’s really a team effort.”

TEAM

Architect: Corgan Associates Inc., Dallas
General Contractor: Lee Lewis Construction Inc., Dallas
Roofing Contractor: Progressive Roofing Services Inc., Duncanville, Texas

McElroy Metal Announces Release of Updated Product Catalog

McElroy Metal has announced the download availability of its updated company product catalog.

The 36-page catalog features the McElroy Metal line of construction products and components for the architectural metal construction industry. The catalog includes detailed information on the 138T and 238T symmetrical standing seam roof recover systems as well as engineered retrofit systems that adapt an existing roof’s structural support system, whether constructed of steel, concrete or wood. Among the other company offerings featured are insulated metal panels under the name of Green Span Profiles, a joint venture IMP manufacturing company.

Furthermore, the catalog highlights the company’s standing seam systems, concealed fastener wall panels, exposed fastener roof and wall panels as well as soffit and fascia offerings.

To have a hard copy of the catalog mailed to you, email a request to info@mcelroymetal.com. To download a PDF, visit this website.

Coating System Makes Roofing and Cladding Appear Aged, Weathered

McElroy Metal's Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

McElroy Metal’s Cor-Ten AZP Raw offers the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

Bossier City, La.-based McElroy Metal’s Cor-Ten AZP Raw is new to the company’s product line, offering the look of aged or weathered roofing and cladding.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that uses cool pigment technology that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet. It’s available in a variety of McElroy Metal standing-seam and through-fastened panel profiles. The look of aged or weathered roofing and wall cladding is growing in popularity and used in commercial, residential and industrial applications. Cor-Ten AZP Raw provides the appearance of rusted metal with the advantages of a highly reflective PVDF coating.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet.

Cor-Ten AZP Raw is a fluoropolymer coating system that McElroy Metal applies over Galvalume-coated steel sheet.


“We’re offering the appearance of weathered steel without having to wait for time and Mother Nature,” says Ken Gieseke, vice president of Marketing at McElroy Metal. “As soon as it’s installed, the weathered aesthetic is evident, attractive and durable. It’s sure to become a popular choice of architects and building owners seeking the look of weathered steel.”

In 2005, U.S. Steel introduced Cor-Ten AZP prepainted steel sheet to provide architects, building owners and homeowners with an enhanced performance product to its Cor-Ten steel. McElroy Metal offers the moderately weathered Cor-Ten AZP Raw, a carefully crafted and engineered system to provide any roofing or cladding project with the authentic look of timelessness.

Raw is produced by McElroy Metal in collaboration with Valspar and U.S. Steel.

To learn more, visit here or call (318) 747-8000.

PHOTOS: McElroy Metal

MCA Recognizes Eight Building Projects at Awards Show

Selected by a panel of professional architects, eight building projects from across the country have been recognized by the Metal Construction Association (MCA) at the 2017 Chairman’s Awards show.

Announced at the MCA’s winter meeting held in Weston, Fla., the Chairman’s Awards are given to the year’s most exceptional building projects involving MCA member companies. Awards are based on overall appearance, significance of metal in the project, innovative use of metal, and the role of metal in achieving project objectives.

The MCA Chairman’s Awards were given in eight categories: overall excellence; residential; metal roofing; education, primary and secondary schools; education, colleges and universities; institutional; municipal; and commercial/industrial.

The 2016 Chairman’s Award winners in each category were:

Recipients for these awards are selected each year from projects submitted by MCA members to “Metal Architecture Magazine’s” annual Design Awards Program. The honorees were chosen by a panel of professional architects, which included Mark Dewalt, AIA, principal, Valerio Dewalt Train Associates, Chicago; Mark Horton, FAIA, principal, Mark Horton/Architecture, San Francisco; Brent Schipper, AIA, LEED AP, principal, ASK Studio, Des Moines, Iowa.