Resuscitate Metal Roofs and Walls with a Reflective Restoration Coating

“Roofers’ Choice” was determined by the product that received the most reader inquiries from the July/August 2014 issue’s “Materials & Gadgets” section.

The Garland Co. Inc. recently introduced its CPR System, a highly reflective, low-odor, synthetic liquid rubber membrane designed to waterproof and restore existing metal roof and wall panel systems, delaying costly roof replacement and improving the overall performance of the roof system.

The Garland Co. Inc. recently introduced its CPR System, a highly reflective, low-odor, synthetic liquid rubber membrane designed to waterproof and restore existing metal roof and wall panel systems, delaying costly roof replacement and improving the overall performance of the roof system.

The Garland Co. Inc. recently introduced its CPR System, a highly reflective, low-odor, synthetic liquid rubber membrane designed to waterproof and restore existing metal roof and wall panel systems, delaying costly roof replacement and improving the overall performance of the roof system.

This lightweight, multi-layer waterproofing system will only add one-fifth of a pound per square foot to existing roof systems when completed, eliminating the time and cost associated with engineering a new roof system. The CPR System provides resistance to UV damage and deterioration caused by weathering by forming a rubber-like monolithic membrane over the entire surface. It is designed for application to properly prepared stainless steel, galvanized metals, Galvalume-coated metals, copper, aluminum and Kynar-coated metal roof systems.

According to Tom Stuewe, a Garland product manager: “The CPR System is the answer for building owners or facility managers who don’t have the budget for a replacement but need to extend the life of their roof system. The ease of application makes it ideal for in-house maintenance use, and its cold-process, low-odor formulation allows restoration projects to proceed with minimal disruptions to building operations and occupants.”

The CPR System is available in brush-or-trowel-grade versions and can be easily applied over sloped, contoured surfaces. When properly installed and maintained, this system can provide an additional 10 to 15 years of service life.

PHOTO: THE GARLAND CO. INC.

Learn More

Visit GarlandCo.com.
Call (800) 321-9336

Scan for Moisture in a Variety of Membranes and Insulation Thicknesses

Tramex Dec Scanner

Tramex Dec Scanner

The Tramex Dec Scanner is a mobile non-destructive impedance moisture scanner designed for the instant surveying of moisture conditions in roofing and waterproofing systems. Three ranges of sensitivity enable the inspection of a variety of roof membranes and insulation thicknesses. By moving the Dec Scanner across a roof surface in a regular pattern, a continuous reading is obtained and areas that contain moisture can be readily identified. It includes an ergonomic, easy-to-reach and easy-to-operate control panel.

Membrane Restores Existing Metal Roofs

The Garland Co. Inc. has introduced its CPR System, a highly reflective, low-odor, synthetic liquid rubber membrane designed to waterproof and restore existing metal roof and wall panel systems.

The Garland Co. Inc. has introduced its CPR System, a highly reflective, low-odor, synthetic liquid rubber membrane designed to waterproof and restore existing metal roof and wall panel systems.

The Garland Co. Inc. has introduced its CPR System, a highly reflective, low-odor, synthetic liquid rubber membrane designed to waterproof and restore existing metal roof and wall panel systems. The lightweight, multi-layer waterproofing system will add 1/5 pound per square foot to existing roof systems when completed. It can be applied to properly prepared stainless steel, galvanized metals, Galvalume-coated metals, copper, aluminum and Kynarcoated metal roof systems. It is available in a brush- or trowel-grade version and can provide an additional 10 to 15 years of service life.

Project Profiles: Health Care

MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL, BOSTON

TEAM

Roofing contractor: Chapman Waterproofing Co., Boston
Architect/engineer: Cambridge Seven Associates Inc., Cambridge, Mass.
Membrane and waterproofing manufacturer: Kemper System America Inc.

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, features a Kemperol waterproofing and roofing membrane for its green roof.

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, features a Kemperol waterproofing and roofing membrane for its green roof.

ROOF MATERIALS

The Kempertec EP-Primer was used to prepare the substrate surfaces for membrane installation and served as a temporary waterproofing system, allowing the project to be exposed to the harsh New England winter while it was completed in phased stages.

The owners chose the Kemperol waterproofing and roofing membrane, a two-component with catalyst, high-performance, seamless and self-terminating cold-fluid-applied reinforced unsaturated polyester system. The monolithic edge-to-edge rot- and root-resistant Kemper membrane is engineered to resist degradation from UV exposure and heat intensity and is resistant to most common chemicals.

ROOF REPORT

Founded in 1811, Massachusetts General Hospital is the third oldest general hospital in the U.S. and the oldest and largest in New England. The 900-bed medical center offers sophisticated diagnostic and therapeutic care in virtually every specialty and subspecialty of medicine and surgery. When MGH’s owners envisioned constructing a new 9,000-square-foot green roof above the MGH cancer wing, they had two chief concerns: safety and long-term durability.

The landscaped roof design includes four different gardens with extensive shrubbery, trees and grass designed to provide cancer patients with a haven for relaxation and meditation to aid in the healing process.

A key challenge concerning the hospital’s green roof was its hundreds of penetrations, spaced inches apart, for a sprinkler system to irrigate the landscaped roof. A leak-detection system was installed across the entire square footage of the project to detect water before it seeps into the interior of the building. The leak-detection system confirms the project’s seal-tight success. Upon completion, Kemper System provided a 20-year, no-dollar-limit warranty.

PHOTO: KEMPER SYSTEM AMERICA INC.

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The KEMPEROL Roofpatch Provides 50 Years of Waterproofing Technology in a Quick Kit

KEMPEROL Roofpatch is a ready-to-use patch kit from Kemper System America Inc., West Seneca, N.Y.

KEMPEROL Roofpatch is a ready-to-use patch kit from Kemper System America Inc., West Seneca, N.Y.

KEMPEROL Roofpatch is a ready-to-use patch kit from Kemper System America Inc., West Seneca, N.Y. Kemper System invented cold, liquid-applied, reinforced waterproofing technology more than 50 years ago, and the Roofpatch kit offers the company’s technology as a quick solution to reliably stop leaks and cover cracks and damaged areas.

“The product itself is a cold, liquid-applied membrane system,” says Gino Soroker, brand and business development manager for Kemper System America. “Typically our product comes as a container of liquid and a roll of fleece, and you need a contractor to put the two together. Here you get the two already married.”

The kit’s flat aluminum packaging includes rubber gloves and a reinforcement fleece pre-saturated in a single-component, solvent-free and odor-free KEMPEROL 1K-SF waterproofing resin. The reinforced membrane is pre-cut to approximately 10 by 18 inches; a single patch can handle most repairs. Patches also can be overlapped to cover larger areas.

The reinforced membrane is pre-cut to approximately 10 by 18 inches; a single patch can handle most repairs.

The reinforced membrane is pre-cut to approximately 10 by 18 inches; a single patch can handle most repairs.

The multipurpose patch adheres tightly without a primer to bitumen sheets, PVC roofing, concrete, wood and metal. The resin is rainproof in 60 minutes and can be walked on after 12 hours.

Soroker says the kit is ideal for roof consultants and roofing contractors, as well as building owners and property managers, seeking an immediate repair on a roof. “If a building superintendent or roofing contractor gets called up on the roof because a tenant reports a leak and he sees an overlap or a crack, he can rip open this aluminum pouch and slap on the roof patch right there and then,” he says. “If a specifier or consultant needs to cut open the roof to find out what’s happening beneath it,
he can put the piece he cut out back in, place this patch right over it and seal up the hole he just opened.”

The kit’s flat aluminum packaging includes rubber gloves and a reinforcement fleece pre-saturated in a single-component, solvent-free and odor-free KEMPEROL 1K-SF waterproofing resin.

The kit’s flat aluminum packaging includes rubber gloves and a reinforcement fleece pre-saturated in a single-component, solvent-free and odor-free KEMPEROL 1K-SF waterproofing resin.

Developed in Germany, the UV-stable Roofpatch was introduced in the U.S. a year and a half ago. It currently is available nationwide through select distributors of building products. It also can be purchased via Kemper System America’s online store, which can be accessed through its website.

Learn more
Visit KemperSystem.net.
Call (800) 541-5455.
Watch the Roofpatch demonstration video.

The inaugural “Roofers’ Choice” was determined by the product that received the most reader inquiries from the January/February issue’s “Materials & Gadgets” section.

PHOTOS: Kemper System America Inc.

Detect Moisture with Non-destructive Kit

The RWS Kit from Tramex Ltd.

The RWS Kit from Tramex Ltd.

The RWS Kit from Tramex Ltd. is a complete moisture inspection kit for the roofing professional. The kit allows for deep penetration through non-conductive roofing membranes, Exterior Insulation and Finish System or drywall barriers. It does not use destructive or pin-type instruments while accurately and quickly locating and tracing leaks and their source.

The kit, which is suitable for leak detection in membranes, insulation and EIFS, includes the following:

An RWS non-destructive moisture meter
Professional digital pin-type resistance meter
Handheld electrode with 7-inch insulated pins
Infrared Surface Thermometer
Telescopic Handle (for use on roofs)
High-impact, polypropylene carrying case, with die-cut foam lining
(Optional) Digital Hygrometer

The meters are battery-operated (batteries are supplied) and feature clear, easy-to-read analog/digital dials.

All Tramex products carry a full satisfaction guarantee including a one-year warranty against defects in parts and workmanship, as well as a refund if the unit is returned, shipping pre-paid, in new condition within 21 days of original delivery. Proof of purchase is necessary.

Attention Roof System Designers: Numerous Roof Components Work Together to Affect a Building

There has been a great deal of opinion expressed in the past 15 years related to the roof cover(s), or the top surface of a roof system, such as “it can save you energy” and “it will reduce urban heat islands”. These opinions consequently have resulted in standards and code revisions that have had an extraordinary effect on the roofing industry.

The building type should influence the type of roof system designed. Some spaces, like this steel plant, are unconditioned, so insulation in the roof system is not desired.

The building type should influence the type of roof system designed. Some spaces, like this steel plant, are unconditioned, so insulation in the roof system is not desired.

Let’s say it loud and clear, “A single component, does not a roof make!”. Roofs are systems, composed of numerous components that work and interact together to affect the building in question. Regardless of your concern or goal—energy performance, urban heat-island minimization, long-term service life (in my opinion, the essence of sustainability) or protection from the elements—the performance is the result of an assembled set of roof system components.

Roof System Components

Energy conservation is an often-discussed potential of roofs, but many seem to think it is the result of only the roof-cover color. I think not. Energy performance is the result of many factors, including but not limited to:

Building use: Is the building an office, school, hospital, warehouse, fabrication facility, etc.? Each type of building use places different requirements on the roof system.

Spatial use and function be low the roof deck: It is not uncommon in urban areas to have mechanical rooms or interstitial spaces below the roof—spaces that require little to no heating or cooling. These spaces are typically unconditioned and unoccupied and receive no material benefit from the roof system in regard to energy savings.

Roof-deck type: The type of roof deck—whether steel; cast-in-place, precast and post-tensioned concrete; gypsum; cementitious wood fiber; or (don’t kill the messenger) plywood, which is a West Coast anomaly—affects air and moisture transport toward the exterior, as well as the type of roof system.

Roof-to-wall transition(s): The transition of the roofing to walls often results in unresolved design issues, as well as cavities that allow moisture and vapor transport.

Meanwhile others, like this indoor pool, require extreme care in design and should include a vapor retarder and insulation.

Meanwhile others, like this indoor pool, require extreme care in design and
should include a vapor retarder and insulation.

Roof air and/or vapor barrier: Its integration into the wall air barrier is very important. Failure to tie the two together creates a breach in the barrier.

Substrate board: Steel roof decks often require a substrate board to support the air and vapor barrier membranes. The substrate board also can be the first layer of the roof system to provide wind-uplift resistance.

Insulation type: Each insulation type—whether polyisocyanurate, expanded polystyrene, extruded polystyrene, wood fiber, foam glass or mineral wool—has differing R-values, some of which drop with time. Many insulation types have differing facer options and densities.

The number of insulation layers: This is very important! A single layer of insulation results in a high level of energy loss; 7 percent is the industry standard. When installing multiple layers of insulation, the joints should be offset from layer to layer to avoid vapor movement and thermal shorts.

Sealing: Voids between rooftop penetrations, adjacent board and the roof-edge perimeters can create large avenues for heat loss.

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SPRI Distributes ‘PV Ready’ Technical Bulletin

Waltham, Mass.-based SPRI’s Technical Committee and board of directors have approved and distributed to the organization’s members Technical Bulletin 1-13A, “Summary of SPRI Membrane Manufacturer Photovoltaic (PV) Ready Roof Systems and Services”. The bulletin contains general guidelines from SPRI related to “PV Ready” roof assemblies and services designed to provide maximum protection for the roof (and maintain its warranty coverage). SPRI represents sheet membrane and component suppliers to the commercial roofing industry.

“Commercial rooftops are a convenient platform for installing solar photovoltaic systems,” says SPRI Technical Director Mike Ennis. “However, it’s important to remember that the roof’s primary function is to protect the building’s contents and its people from the elements.”

Technical Bulletin 1-13 raises important considerations for the building owner, such as the added weight of a PV array and the impact of wind and fire approvals. The bulletin also lists potential PV system-specific requirements from manufacturers to maintain existing warranties; project documentation forms frequently required to install the PV system over an existing warranted roof; and general issues and additional services offered by manufacturers, such as single-source warranties for the roof system and solar integration.

SPRI gathered the information included in Technical Bulletin 1-13 from a survey of information available on websites and literature of SPRI member membrane manufacturers. As such, the bulletin serves as a summary of the PV-ready products, requirements and services currently offered by SPRI members and is available for distribution to customers.

“Each SPRI member may have its own PV ready program, and no SPRI member may necessarily be considered to have all program elements,” Ennis adds. “The building owner should always consult the manufacturer of the roof system specified for the new construction or reroofing project prior to the installation of a PV system on a warranted roof.”

In addition, Ennis writes about PV Ready rooftop considerations in “Tech Point”.

Project Profiles: Government

Richland County Landfill Columbia, S.C.

Petersen Aluminum roofing

Team

Roofing contractor: Aqua Seal Manufacturing and Roofing Inc., West Columbia, S.C.
Metal roof, soffit and wall manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp., Elk Grove Village, Ill.

Roof Materials

The following materials were used on the roof:

  • 6,903 square feet of 24-gauge Tite-Loc in the Cityscape color
  • 1,216 square feet of 24-gauge HWP 16-inch Panel in the Cityscape color
  • 1,673 square feet of 0.032 PAC-850 Full Vent in the Cityscape color

Roof Report

Petersen Aluminum roofing
This new construction project began in early October 2012 and was completed in April 2013. Petersen Aluminum provided a complete metal system: roof, soffit and wall.

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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