The Top 5 Issues in Metal Roof Installation

Metal roofs offer a number of benefits for both homeowners and roofing contractors. Installation problems, however, can cause functional or aesthetic issues that can result in problems, delays and unhappy clients. Following are the five most common roof installation issues and how to solve them.

1. Metal Shavings Causing Rust Streaks

Installing a metal roof requires drilling through the aluminum or steel roof panels to attach them to the substrate. The process creates metal shavings, especially at rivet holes along the ridge cap or when drilling through multiple layers of roof panels.

These metal panels show evidence of rust stains caused by metal shavings. Photos: Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing

Those tiny shards of metal can cause rust and stains on the roof, as well as corrosion that shortens the lifespan of the roof. The more layers of metal a crew has to drill through, the more shavings will be produced.

“Shavings are no problem when removed quickly,” says Paul Hope, field service technician for Gulf Coast Supply. “It is when they are left behind that they become an issue.”

“When metal shavings sit on the roof for a week to a month they start to corrode,” Hope says. “That corrosion leads to staining of your panels, and that staining leads to unhappy homeowners.”

Roofers should get in the habit of either sweeping or blowing metal shavings off of the roof at the end of the workday, according to Hope.

2. Improperly Installed Underlayment

Underlayment has to be carefully measured and lapped to avoid moisture infiltration into the building envelope. Local building codes specify lap coverage guidelines and slip sheet placement for underlayment installation.

Underlayment must be carefully measured and installed correctly to prevent moisture infiltration. The underlayment shown here is not lapped correctly.

Underlayment is designed to act as a secondary water barrier in case rain makes it past the metal roof. Some of the most common causes of water intrusion are fastener failure, wind-driven rain in extreme storms, or metal-to-metal connections with no sealant.

Avoiding underlayment issues is easy to do if the crew follows installation instructions and code requirements. If underlayment is not installed correctly, however, replacement costs can be expensive and involve removing the metal roof, replacing the roof substrate and installing new underlayment.

3. Over-Tightened and Under-Tightened Fasteners

Proper fastener installation is critical to the efficiency of a roof system. Because fasteners penetrate the metal roof, underlayment and roof deck, they can allow for water infiltration into an otherwise waterproofed roof.

Over-tightened screws compress the washer too much and can cause water to pool. Under-tightened screws will not hold panels securely and can cause premature wear of fasteners and panels.

During the installation, screws must be straight and tight to perform as intended. Fasteners that are not installed straight do not form a proper seal. And even when they are straight, over-tightening the screw compresses the washer too much, forms “dimples” in the metal panel and causes water pooling that can then infiltrate the attic.

Under-tightened screws won’t hold the roof panel securely and can cause premature wear of both the fastener and panel.

4. Inadequate Onsite Storage Arrangements

Roofing materials should be delivered in a particular sequence, close to the time roofers will need them. The longer roofing materials, such as panels, are stored on site, the more prone they will be to damage from the elements or construction-site mishaps.

Improper storage of roofing panels at the jobsite can lead to damaged and corrosion.

Workers should pay attention to where and how materials are stored. Are they out of the way of vehicles? Are they on a flat surface? Are they elevated on one end to allow for drainage of rainwater?

Standing water, especially on unpainted panels, can cause wet storage stains or what is known as “white rust.” Sand, dirt and debris can also damage metal panels, causing permanent stains before they are ever installed on a roof.

5. Delays Due to Worker Injury

Safety is crucial on any jobsite but especially when installing a metal roof. Injury and accident prevention should be the primary duty of crew chiefs and workers alike. Accidents can not only send workers to the hospital, they can affect scheduling and job productivity as well.

“Medical bills, downtime, and loss of skilled laborers for extended periods of recovery can take place,” Hope says. “It is the responsibility of every individual to properly protect themselves from day to day.”

Proper safety equipment is essential. Gloves and Kevlar sleeves can help roofers protect themselves from cuts.

Falls are the most common potential metal roofing injury. Workers should use harnesses when on the roof and in any other fall-risk situations. Someone on the crew also needs to maintain the condition of the safety equipment. “Nicks in the harness can jeopardize your entire fall system,” Hope says.

Cuts caused by the sharp edges of the metal panels are also a hazard. Gloves and Kevlar cut sleeves can help roofers protect themselves.

Less common threats include electrocution and burns. Electricity, whether from a live current or lightning, can travel through the metal. Rubber shoes and gloves can protect roofers from potentially fatal shocks. Burns are less common, but in hot climates, the sun can heat metal enough to cause an injury. Workers can protect themselves with gloves and protective clothing.

Taking care to address these five common metal roofing installation issues can result in a smoother, more effective process, fewer problems and more satisfied clients.

About the author: Jared Pearce is the technical services manager at Gulf Coast Supply & Manufacturing. The son of a general contractor, Pearce has been around the construction industry his whole life. He is also a native Floridian and a Coast Guard veteran. Gulf Coast Supply has been a trusted choice for metal roof products throughout the Southeast for more than two decades. Through its Contractor’s Advantage program, Gulf Coast offers both classroom and hands-on seminars to help fill the industry’s need for qualified roofers. For more information, visit www.GulfCoastSupply.com.

Picturesque Mountain Clubhouse Gets a Metal Roof Upgrade

The Clubhouse at Lake Sconti was recently re-roofed with CertainTeed’s Matterhorn Shake metal roofing. Photo: CertainTeed

Just 60 miles north of Atlanta in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, the 7,000-acre Big Canoe community is an ideal location where residents enjoy mountains, lakes and a 27-hole championship golf course. The Clubhouse at Lake Sconti serves as Big Canoe’s central hub, with 25,000 square feet of gathering space that is host to weddings, corporate events, writers’ groups, poker clubs, trivia nights and more. Adding another 10,000 square feet to the overall facility is Duffer’s Bar and Grille and an adjoining golf cart storage facility.

Big Canoe’s original clubhouse — established in the early 1970s along with the community — burned to the ground 13 years ago after being struck by lightning. The entire structure was rebuilt, which included the installation of a classic cedar shake roof. After severe wind and hail damage from a more recent storm, the Big Canoe community found itself in the position of needing a complete roof replacement.

“It was a beautiful roof, but we weren’t getting the longevity out of the cedar shake as originally intended,” says Katie Wercholuk, marketing and communications director of the Big Canoe Property Owners Association. “We want our residents to be proud of their clubhouse and to not bear the cost of a new clubhouse roof every 10 years. We needed something with durability that would be able to stand up to mountain weather, which can sometimes be unpredictable.”

After six months of researching the best solution, the Big Canoe Property Owners Association found Colony Roofers, a veteran-owned roofing company based in Marietta, Georgia. Company president Mark Seymour suggested CertainTeed’s Matterhorn Shake in the color Cedar to keep the look of classic cedar shake while adding the benefits of metal.

“You should get about 30-40 years out of a cedar shingle roof, but it was 11 years and the original roof was deteriorating much quicker than it should have,” notes Seymour. “As we started ripping it off, we noticed that it wasn’t vented very well. A lot of the cedar shake shingles were curling up and breaking apart. It also sits inside of a valley and gets a lot of wind, so many of the hip and ridge shingles were coming up.”

Between the clubhouse, restaurant and golf cart barn, the job required 40,000 square feet of metal roof panels. In addition to be being the largest metal roofing job undertaken by Colony Roofing, the job’s secluded location and status as an active business presented additional challenges to the installing team.

“This was a big, six-to-eight-week job,” Seymour says. “Putting a roof on an operating business is difficult, so it required a lot of coordination with the property owners association. Big Canoe is also up in the mountains, so some of the bridges and roads you have to navigate aren’t meant for tractor-trailers and big machinery. If we were doing a standing seam roof where you have to stage long runs of metal and cut them to size, we would have definitely had some issues transporting it.”

Seymour said the way the product is designed and palletized allowed his team to “minimize the footprint” his team had on the property, and that the interlocking panel system allowed his crew to install the product quickly, helping Big Canoe get back to business as usual.

“Weather is unpredictable in the mountains and storms will come and go in the evenings,” says Seymour. “The main thing that helped us move quicker was the Matterhorn system. It goes on well and interlocks in a way our guys can understand. It’s a well-designed, user-friendly product.”

According to Wercholuk, the installation is a “win-win” for the Big Canoe community. “It’s not just low-maintenance, it’s no-maintenance and it looks beautiful,” says Wercholuk. “Anytime you have guests or visitors, the clubhouse is something you want to show off. We have intentionally tight architectural controls here and everything just blends into nature. You would never be able to tell it’s metal from far away.”

Wercholuk said that the product has left a great impression on Big Canoe’s roughly 6,000 residents.

“Everything we’ve heard from residents has been extremely positive,” Wercholuk adds. “Metal provided the look we were after as a mountain community, but with more efficiency.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Colony Roofers, Marietta, Georgia, www.colonyroofers.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System: Matterhorn Shake metal roofing in Cedar, CertainTeed, www.certainteed.com

MRA Kicks Off Best Metal Roofing Competition for Installers & Contractors

Enter the “Best Metal Roofing Project” competition hosted by the Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA). Beginning Oct. 4, 2018 through Dec. 31, 2018, the MRA will award one monthly first prize winner for the project judged to be the most outstanding example of a great metal roofing project.

Open to U.S. and Canada contractors, installers and manufacturers, entries will be evaluated based on appearance, performance and originality/use of materials and each monthly first-prize winner will receive a $500 cash prize. To enter, interested participants can upload a photo of their metal roofing project and a 200-word or less description at www.metalroofing.com.

“This competition celebrates all of the fantastic work going on in the metal roofing industry right now,” said Renee Ramey, MRA executive director. “Not only do metal roofs perform exceptionally well, but installers getting very creative when it comes to material use and incorporating styles that add incredible curb appeal.”

With more color options available than any other roofing type and designs that range from traditional to contemporary, metal roofing can help highlight any architectural style and yet it is also among the most durable, long-lasting and sustainable option available. Demand for metal roofing is increasing, making it the second most popular choice for U.S. homeowners and helping increase profitability for installers and contractors.

For more information about how to enter MRA’s “Best Metal Roofing” competition for the trades, visit www.metalroofing.com

Landmark Venue Renovated with PPG Coating Wins MCA Chairman’s Award

PPG announced that the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Uniondale, New York, which features PPG DURABRITE coating, has won a Chairman’s Award for design excellence from the Metal Construction Association (MCA).

Built in 1972 and once home to the NHL’s New York Islanders and the NBA’s New York Nets, the 416,000 square-foot arena is newly wrapped in a futuristic metal shell composed of 4,700 individually folded and routed brushed aluminum fins enhanced by PPG Durabrite clear fluoropolymer coating.

Based on high-performance fluoroethylene vinyl ether (FEVE) resins, PPG Durabrite coating is a direct-to-metal product specially formulated to extend and enrich the beauty of architectural metals by protecting them with a resilient, transparent clearcoat.

The aluminum fins were fabricated by Sobotec Ltd. of Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, using 225,000 square feet of 4-millimeter ALUCOBOND PLUS aluminum composite material from 3A Composite USA in Davidson, North Carolina.

The fins are anchored to the structure’s original concrete exterior via a custom-engineered structural attachment system by Sobotec. Using that system, Crown Corr, Inc., of Gary, Indiana, fitted the Alucobond fins into pre-fabricated metal frames and attached them to the building, which was painted black to emphasize the muted glow of the brushed aluminum.

MCA judge Mark Dewalt said he appreciated the unique approach ShoP Architects and developer Forest City Ratner took to revive the building, which likely would have been torn down if not for the firms’ innovative design solution.

“I thought it was a pretty interesting recladding – [a metal] screen wrapped around the existing building,” he explained. “It’s very dynamic, creating a lot of movement. It’s like a giant slinky.”

The annual Chairman’s Awards recognize exceptional building projects involving MCA members. The awards are based on overall appearance, the significance of metal in the project, innovative use of metal and the role of metal in achieving project objectives.

For more information, visit www.ppgmetalcoatings.com.

Waterproofing Membrane Designed to Protect Wood and Metal

MFM Building Products, a manufacturer of a full envelope of waterproofing and weather barrier products for the building industry, introduces DeckWrap PowerBond.

DeckWrap PowerBond is a self-adhering waterproofing membrane that protects the surface of the wood with a highly aggressive, patented PowerBond adhesive system. The membrane aggressive bonds to wood or metal surfaces at temperatures as low as 25°F (-4°C). The membrane also is self-sealing around nails, screws, punctures and other fasteners. The self-sealing properties prevent water penetration to protect the structural elements extending the life of the deck.

DeckWrap PowerBond is suitable for use with treated, untreated and synthetic woods and stops corrosion of metal components that come in contact with ACQ-treated lumber. It is ideal for ledgers, joists, top edges and post applications to protect against premature rot and degradation. The “self-stick” property allows for quick and easy installation. The only tools required are a sharp utility knife.

DeckWrap PowerBond is available in pre-packaged rolls of 3-inches and 6-inches by 75-feet length, and 12-inches width by 25-feet length. Thickness of the membrane is 25 mils. For more information, visit www.mfmbp.com.

 

New MRA Website Helps Installers, Contractors Capitalize on Booming Metal Roofing Market

Contractors now have a powerful new tool to capitalize on the skyrocketing growth of the metal roofing installation business.

The Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA) has launched a revamped website that offers member contractors real-time quality lead retrieval, sophisticated marketing benefits and greater membership opportunities all in a mobile-friendly, streamlined and easy-to-use platform.

The metal roofing industry has captured 14 percent of the overall U.S. re-roofing market, and adoption is continuing to grow rapidly. To help contractors and installers take advantage of the opportunity to increase business, MRA’s new site gives members the ability to showcase their company with detailed profile information, a customizable project portfolio and contact resources. A new, simplified reporting system allows members to find, filter and access leads from anywhere, while a built-in system tracks project status, details and notes about prospective customers. The new site is at www.metalroofing.com.

With the demand for skilled metal roof installers on the rise, the MRA also is emphasizing online education and training resources for the trade. The MRA website’s popular Ask the Experts forum offers personalized guidance and information to help address some of the most technical questions from highly experienced experts. A growing number of training videos and resources, including answers to frequently-asked customer questions, also are available to members via a simple, mobile-friendly platform. Installers and contractors interested in becoming an MRA member can contact MRA’s Member Liaison at dottie@metalroofing.com to find out more information.

“Our top priority is to help contractors take better advantage of the tremendous opportunities that the metal roofing industry has to offer,” said Renee Ramey, executive director of the Metal Roofing Alliance. “This new site is built with the busy installer in mind, providing business-building tools and making it easy for them to find the resources and information they need.”

Powerful resource for homeowners

For consumers considering metal roofing, the new image-rich site features an interactive metal roofing visualizer that allows homeowners to “try on” different styles and colors of metal roofs to see how they might look on their own homes. A robust image gallery now provides convenient search filters for different metal roof styles, colors and designs. The search to find a local contractor has also been streamlined, giving consumers quick access to reputable metal roofing installers and the ability to review their experience and work. A handy roofing material comparison tool provides homeowners with detailed information for how an investment in a metal roof stands up to other options on the market.

“The new site is really built to benefit both sides of the equation—installers and homeowners,” said Ramey. “Homeowners are definitely interested in learning more about metal roofing, and the site is designed to make it easy for them to not only get their questions answered, but get in touch with a qualified installer to take the next step.”

For more information, visit www.metalroofing.com.

Feeling Comfortable With Metal Roofing

Metal Roof Consultants Inc

Photo: Metal Roof Consultants Inc.

Theodore Roosevelt once said, “The best thing you can do is the right thing; the next best thing you can do is the wrong thing; the worst thing you can do is nothing.” 

Throughout our lives, we must decide what to do and how to deal with the inevitable fear that surrounds doing anything for the first time. Remember that bicycle in the garage that looked so inviting—until you thought of how it would be impossible for you to balance yourself on those two tiny wheels and pedal it forward without falling and hurting yourself. Your mind focused on falling and not the excitement of being able to conquer riding that bicycle. Yet, as Theodore Roosevelt said many years ago, “the worst thing you can do is nothing.” 

We are faced with new things throughout our lives, and when we do we usually must weigh the possibilities of doing the right thing, the wrong thing, or nothing. However, if we expect to have a productive and peaceful life, we must force ourselves to always do “something.”  

Finally, we must also ask ourselves why we even consider new things we contemplate doing. When we take on a new task and we know why we are doing it, we are comfortable with taking whatever risk is anticipated. When we know that the only wrong thing to do is nothing, we have the possibility to achieve even greater things. Even if it turns out to be the wrong thing, we will learn valuable lessons about ourselves and the task we were trying to accomplish.  

Now, let’s look at the metal roofing industry and ask ourselves whether we are “doing nothing” either because we are afraid of “falling off the bicycle” or because we haven’t determined why we want to enter this market. Both reasons limit your personal and business potential to what you are doing now. Now, let’s explore some of the reasons you might not be comfortable entering the metal roof market, thereby limiting your growth potential. 

The Metal Market

Metal roofing has been around since 1932, when the first standing seam roof panel was introduced by Armco steel at the World’s Fair in Chicago. However, it is still a rather small percentage of the total roofing market. Why? In part, it’s because some contractors fear entering this market. Let’s look at some of the reasons that the unknown aspects of metal roofing, or the incorrect perception of a metal roofing system, can cause contractors to avoid this market: 

Metal Roof Consultants Inc.

Photo: Metal Roof Consultants Inc.

Specialized workforce. There is the perception that this market requires a field force that is very difficult to gather. The reality is that the metal roofing systems in today’s market include parts and components that are easily put together. Manufacturers provide training in how to install their specific pre-manufactured components that make up a metal roof system. In general, there are panels, clips, and termination components (ridge, rake, gutter/eave, curbs, etc.). These components have been developed over decades of trial and error and, when installed correctly, will create a leak-proof roof system which will last as long as any of the other building components. In addition to the metal roof manufacturers, the Metal Buildings and Erectors Association (MBCEA) is a group that provides independent training on the proper erection of metal buildings, including all components of a metal roof system. 

Engineering. The engineering associated with a metal roof system is the responsibility of the manufacturer per the International Building Code (IBC). Local engineering for a particular metal roof can be provided by a professional engineer licensed in the locale of the particular job site. Both sources are readily available to the contractor that wishes to enter the metal roof contracting business. The contractor should not have any concerns about this aspect of a metal roof if he does his due diligence and partners with a manufacturer that will provide the tested engineering characteristics of a particular roofing system and a local engineer who can take that information and perform a code-required analysis. 

Details. As opposed to sheet membrane or shingled roof systems, the metal roof system has its own details. These details require a different understanding of water protection. Metal components, including the actual roof sheet, will not allow water to penetrate and, if protected with a galvalume coating, will last well over 60 years (refer to Metalconstruction.org, Technical Resources, “Service Life Assessment of Low-Slope Unpainted 55% Al-Zn Alloy Coated Steel Standing Seam Metal Roof Systems”).  

These metal components, however, need to be joined and terminated with sealants and fasteners to create a total water-resisting barrier. Again, the panel manufacturers have time-tested details to assist contractors. A word of caution, however: Make sure that you properly select the panel type (standing seam, corrugated panel, snap seam panel, etc.) that best suits the project, and match those selections with a manufacturer and the detail that will perform best. Finally, the local engineer must be used to ensure the detailing will resist the local design loads. The contractor is only responsible to select that qualified manufacturer and engineer—not become one. 

Cost. “Since metal roofs cost a lot more than conventional roofs, they must be hard to sell.” While this statement is prevalent in the metal roofing market, it is blatantly untrue. While the initial cost may be higher than a conventional roof, a metal roof offers an exceptional value over its lifetime. In fewer than 20 years, the cost of a metal roof system can be as much as 50 percent less than that of many conventional roofs, and conservatively one-third the cost of these roofs over a 60-year time frame. End of argument!  

The Retrofit Segment

What about metal retrofit roofing? While that question might scare you more than merely considering entering the overall metal roofing market, it can definitely expand your horizon and offers more potential than just riding a bicycle. If you’ve ever ridden in a car, you know that the experience, comfort and potential for getting places is greatly enhanced. The same concept applies when expanding your metal roof market possibilities to include the lucrative metal retrofit roofing market. This market, with its extremely limited contractor participation and increasing customer demand, makes it very interesting to consider.  

Metal Roof Consultants Inc.

Photo: Metal Roof Consultants Inc.

A recent metal retrofit roofing package of six roofs totaling more than $20 million bid in North Carolina, and only three companies submitted bids. Each contractor ended up with two projects each, totaling between $6 and $9 million per contractor. During this same time, single-ply and shingle projects in the same geographical area attracted many more contractors. Again, you may feel that all-too-familiar twinge in your stomach caused by only looking at the negative consequences you might encounter. However, doing nothing is the worst thing you can do. It is true that finding manufacturers and engineers to assist you when entering the retrofit market can be difficult, as the pool is much more limited than that of the metal roofing industry in general, but these resources are available to you. Just be diligent and look harder!  

Finally, consider what a very wise man said many years ago to a young man just out of college. He said, “Can’t never did anything.” That wise man was my father, and he spoke those words on my college graduation day. My experience has seen the metal roof market develop with many new innovations. The metal retrofit roofing market was not even in existence in the 1970s, but it has since become a market that grows year after year. I have been lucky enough to see, and be part of, a revolution in the roofing industry with respect to metal roofing’s place. All the tools you need to enter the market are out there, but, like that bicycle many years ago, you must first determine why you want to ride it and be willing to risk falling off a few times. The rewards are worth it, even if you get your knees scraped a few times. 

Shear Cuts Metal while Conserving Materials and Costs

Kett Tool Co.’s KD-400 18-Gauge Double-Cut Shears help manufacturers and contractors conserve materials and cut costs. The shears deliver precision cuts in cold rolled (C.R.) mild steel, stainless steel, aluminum, plastic and Formica without warping or bending the original material or the finished piece.

Kett Tool Co.’s KD-400 18-Gauge Double-Cut Shears help manufacturers and contractors conserve materials and cut costs.

Kett Tool Co.’s KD-400 18-Gauge Double-Cut Shears help manufacturers and contractors conserve materials and cut costs.

The Double-Cut Shears’ dual blades transfer any distortion produced in cutting to a small 7/32-inch waste strip, leaving behind material edges that are not hardened or burred to allow maximum use of sheet material. The blades’ swiping action also seals edges of coated metals.

Kett’s KD-400 shears use a 5-amp, variable speed, 2,500 RPM electric motor to produce straight or contoured cuts in C.R. mild steel (up to 18-gauge), most grades of stainless steel to 20-gauge, aluminum to 0.080 inches, and plastic or Formica up to 3/32 inches thick—all at speeds of up to 300 inches per minute. The lightweight, maneuverable shears easily follow a scribed line, capable of cutting a radius as small as 6 inches.

The KD-400 Double-Cut Shears are also available with a contour cutting blade 60-21C to cut tighter curves and the HS blade 60-21HS for cutting foam filled doors. All shear heads are precision made in the U.S. featuring A2 tool steel blades for prolonged durability.

The KD-400 Double-Cut Shears are available through authorized dealers.

MCA Recognizes Eight Building Projects at Awards Show

Selected by a panel of professional architects, eight building projects from across the country have been recognized by the Metal Construction Association (MCA) at the 2017 Chairman’s Awards show.

Announced at the MCA’s winter meeting held in Weston, Fla., the Chairman’s Awards are given to the year’s most exceptional building projects involving MCA member companies. Awards are based on overall appearance, significance of metal in the project, innovative use of metal, and the role of metal in achieving project objectives.

The MCA Chairman’s Awards were given in eight categories: overall excellence; residential; metal roofing; education, primary and secondary schools; education, colleges and universities; institutional; municipal; and commercial/industrial.

The 2016 Chairman’s Award winners in each category were:

Recipients for these awards are selected each year from projects submitted by MCA members to “Metal Architecture Magazine’s” annual Design Awards Program. The honorees were chosen by a panel of professional architects, which included Mark Dewalt, AIA, principal, Valerio Dewalt Train Associates, Chicago; Mark Horton, FAIA, principal, Mark Horton/Architecture, San Francisco; Brent Schipper, AIA, LEED AP, principal, ASK Studio, Des Moines, Iowa.

Project Profiles: Retail

Sierra Nevada Brewery, Mills River, N.C.

About 58,000 pounds of copper were installed on the brewery.

About 58,000 pounds of copper were installed on the brewery.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: The Century Slate Roofing Co., Durham, N.C.
Architect: Matthew Galloway of Russell Gallaway Associates Inc., Chico, Calif.

ROOF MATERIALS

Approximately 423 squares of 1/2-inch-thick, 18-inch-tall by random width Unfading Green Slates were installed by hand on the project. This was close to 750,000 pounds of slate, or 375 tons.

About 3,000 feet of custom copper gutters and downspouts, conductor heads and 100 squares of painted standing-seam panels were fabricated, and pre-built copper clad dormers and decorative copper cornices were installed.

The project also included 35 squares of copper standing-seam roofing, 25 squares of soldered copper flat-seam roofing and 115 squares of copper wall cladding. About 58,000 pounds of copper were installed on the brewery.

Everything on the building is oversized and that meant everything had to be built to support the heavy structural loads and live loads from wind and mountain snow. The large roof faces called for 10-inch custom copper gutters. When you have gutters that large in the mountains of North Carolina you have to consider the extraordinary weight of the annual snow.

In addition to snow guards being installed on the slate roof, custom 1/4-inch-thick copper gutter brackets fastened the gutter to the fascia. It is typical on steel-framed construction, particularly on this scale, that the framing is out of square and there is widely varying fascia and rake dimensions.

Approximately 423 squares of 1/2-inch-thick, 18-inch-tall by random width Unfading Green Slates were installed by hand on the project.

Approximately 423 squares of 1/2-inch-thick, 18-inch-tall by random width Unfading Green Slates were installed by hand on the project.

However, these items should not appear out of square or have varying dimensions. Great care had to be taken to measure and custom bend onsite all the detail flashings so everything appeared perfect. This took many skilled craftsmen, a great deal of time and the absolute drive to provide the highest quality work.

Slate Manufacturer: Evergreen Slate Co. Inc.
Copper Fabricator: K&M Sheet Metal LLC
Supplier of Underlayment, Copper Sheets and Coil, Insulation and Nailbase Sheathing: ABC Supply Co. Inc.

ROOF REPORT

The new-construction project began in November 2013 and was completed in September 2015.
The team completed the slate installation so well that The Century Slate Co. was awarded the 2015 Excellence in Craftsmanship Award by Evergreen Slate for the project.

PHOTOS: The Century Slate Roofing Co.

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