S-5! Founder and CEO Receives Larry A. Swaney Award

S-5! founder and CEO, Rob Haddock, has been named the 2015 recipient of the prestigious Larry A. Swaney Award, which honors an individual in metal construction who selflessly fosters the growth and betterment of the industry.

S-5! Founder and CEO Rob Haddock has been named the 2015 recipient of the prestigious Larry A. Swaney Award, which honors an individual in metal construction who selflessly fosters the growth and betterment of the industry.

S-5! Founder and CEO Rob Haddock has been named the 2015 recipient of the Larry A. Swaney Award, which honors an individual in metal construction who selflessly fosters the growth and betterment of the industry. The Metal Construction Association (MCA) sponsors the annual award named after the organization’s first president and one of its founders.

The Swaney Award is bestowed at MCA’s Annual Meeting, held this earlier this year in Palm Springs, Calif. Recipients must exhibit generous commitment to the metal construction industry beyond personal gain, be involved in a leadership capacity, and have made significant contributions to the improvement of metal construction and its supporters.

“Rob has dedicated his professional career for the last 40 years to the advancement of metal roofing within the marketplace,” says S-5! Vice President Keith Lipps. “He has been an influential voice in the promotion, research, and technical advancement of the entire industry, and not just his own corporate product line. He has consulted to many major metal roofing suppliers, assisting them to advance their product lines, develop training programs, initiate technology transfers and more.”

Haddock is also a prolific author of dozens of articles, white papers and industry technical documents. His writings have been published in at least five languages, and he has lectured on metal roofing topics in a dozen countries. He is a generous philanthropist, donating his time, talents, and finances to numerous charitable endeavors around the globe.

“With his western hat, friendly smile, candid speak, and willing participation, Rob is one of the most recognizable personalities in the industry,” Lipps continues.

Rob Haddock began his career as a metal building erector before founding S-5! and becoming a sought-after metal roofing consultant, inventor (he holds more than 30 patents), speaker, and author. He serves as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Wisconsin School of Engineering, is the director of the Metal Roof Advisory Group Ltd., and pilots S-5!, which is a manufacturer of metal roof attachment systems. Haddock has been a Lifetime Honorary Member and advocate of MCA since 1985. He is also a member of CSI, MBMA, ASHRAE, ASCE and ASTM. In 2012 he was a charter inductee to the Metal Construction Hall of Fame.

At the award ceremony, Haddock made special thanks to his family in attendance: sons Dustin and Shawn, daughter Lara, and their spouses, Rebecca and Jessica Haddock and Shane Dunnam. In addition, Haddock expressed gratitude for his staff and the many MCA friends and peers present.

”I am both honored and humbled to receive such a distinguished award and be recognized among the esteemed previous winners, especially remembering that Larry Swaney was the guy who extended a hand of friendship to me and invited me to speak to the MCA group back in 1985,” Haddock says.

CENTRIA Launches Blog About Metal Building Products

CENTRIA launched its blog, The Reveal. With this new outlet, CENTRIA will utilize its expertise in exterior metal building products and services to provide key audiences—architects, building owners and contractors—with engaging, educational and relevant information.

“We’re very excited about The Reveal. It complements our content-rich website, nicely,” says Julie Pawuk, marketing communications manager. “The Reveal blog provides us an online forum and gives us yet another medium to reach architects and building professionals. Our goal is to elaborate and expound upon our technical expertise on exterior wall technology and building science.”

Posts on The Reveal are separated into several categories. The first section, dedicated to CENTRIA’s projects, includes eye-catching photos and narrative surrounding recent completed projects. Each project will feature a technical challenge or aspect that the build team encountered and overcame utilizing CENTRIA products and personnel. Readers will also find information about which CENTRIA products were used and which companies (architectural firms, contractors, etc.) were involved in the project.

The “Panel Discussion” section, written by CENTRIA’s product and technical experts, offers a behind-the-scenes look at CENTRIA’s product technology and focuses on the technological advancements that are solving today’s exterior building challenges.

The third section provides reader with past articles and expert columns from CENTRIA’s Metalmag magazine and e-newsletter publications, educating building owners, architects and contractors. Posts include product spotlights, in-depth case studies, and the latest industry news and trends.

EPDs Provide a New Level of Environmental Transparency to Building Products

The sustainability movement has impacted the building industry in many ways. Today’s architects, owners and occupants have much greater expectations for the environmental performance of the buildings they design, operate and dwell in. Part of this expectation is focused on the components that make up the building. For example, did the wood come from responsibly harvested forests? Is the metal made of recycled material? Do the paint and interior finishes contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs)?

An Environmental Product Declaration, or EPD, is developed by applying a Product Category Rule, or PCR. PCRs are developed, maintained and warehoused by program operators. Examples of program operators include ASTM, CSA, ICC-ES, Environdec and UL Environment. Program operators also verify that an EPD and its associated life-cycle assessment conform with ISO 14025 and the ISO 14040 series. PCR development is commonly a collaborative effort between industry associations, manufacturers, and/or others.

An EPD is developed by applying a Product Category Rule. PCRs are developed, maintained and warehoused by program operators. Examples of program operators include ASTM, CSA, ICC-ES, Environdec and UL Environment. Program operators also verify that an EPD and its associated life-cycle assessment conform with ISO 14025 and the ISO 14040 series. PCR development is commonly a collaborative effort between industry associations, manufacturers, and/or others. IMAGE: Quantis US

Information technology has encouraged and facilitated this increased demand for in-depth data about building components and systems. People have become accustomed to being able to gather exhaustive information about the products they buy through extensive labeling or online research.

In response to the growing demand for environmental product information, building component manufacturers have begun rolling out environmental product declarations, or EPDs.

It’s a term now commonly heard, but what are they? EPDs are often spoken in the same breath as things like LCA (life-cycle assessment), PCRs (product category rules) and many other TLAs (three-letter acronyms). The fact is they are all related and are part of an ongoing effort to provide as much transparency as possible about what goes into the products that go in and on a building.

“An EPD is a specific document that informs the reader about the environmental performance of a product,” explains Sarah Mandlebaum, life-cycle analyst with Quantis US, the Boston-based branch of the global sustainability consulting firm Quantis. “It balances the need for credible and thorough information with the need to make such information reasonably understandable. The information provided in the document is based on a life-cycle assessment, or LCA, of the product, which documents the environmental impacts of that product from ‘cradle to grave.’ This includes impacts from material production, manufacturing, transportation, use and disposal of the product. An EPD is simply a standardized way of communicating the outcomes of such an assessment.”

The concept of product LCAs has been around for some time and has often been looked at as a way of determining the sustainability of a particular product by establishing the full scope of its environmental footprint. The basic idea is to closely catalog everything that goes into a product throughout its entire life. That means the energy, raw materials, and emissions associated with sourcing its materials, manufacturing it, transporting it, installing it and, ultimately, removing and disposing of it. In the end, an LCA results in a dizzying amount of data that can be difficult to translate or put in any context. EPDs are one way to help provide context and help put LCA data to use.

“The summary of environmental impact data in the form of an EPD can be analogous to a nutrition label on food,” says Scott Kriner, LEED AP, technical director of the Metal Construction Association (MCA), Chicago. “There is plenty of information on the label, but the information itself is meaningless unless one is focused on one area. An LCA determines the water, energy and waste involved in the extraction of raw materials, the manufacturing process, the transportation to a job site and the reclamation of waste at the end of the useful life of a product. With that data in hand, the various environmental impact categories can be determined and an EPD can be developed to summarize the environmental impact information.”

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Galvalume-coated Metal Roofs Will Last at Least 60 Years with Minimal Component Repair

The term “infrastructure sustainability” continues to gain importance because of rapidly increasing building infrastructure components around the country needing major repairs and/ or replacements. Consequently, roof maintenance or replacement materials and methods must last at least 60 years; consider LEED v4 from the Washington, D.C.-based U.S. Green Building Council. For more than 30 years, millions of square feet of Galvalume-coated roofs have resisted the atmospheric conditions to which they are exposed with little or no maintenance and are well prepared to continue protecting building interiors for more than 30 additional years. Material science and professional project engineering and installation prove Galvalume-coated metal standing-seam roofs will perform for that period of time.

This is a nine-year-old painted Galvalume roof in Alabama.

This is a nine-year-old painted Galvalume roof in Alabama.

MATERIAL SCIENCE

The first standing-seam metal roof was introduced by Armco Steel Corp., Middletown, Ohio, at the 1932 World’s Fair in Chicago. Armco Steel ceased doing business many years ago, but its standing-seam metal roof design has been adopted by all manufacturers in today’s commercial metal roofing market. The second longest-lasting introduction into this market was in the early 1970s when Bethlehem, Pa.-based Bethlehem Steel introduced a Zinc/Aluminum coating—now known as Galvalume—for carbon-steel metal roofs. This coating, applied to both sides of the steel coil, has been successfully used for the majority of metal standing-seam roofs ever since.

Since Galvalume was introduced, there have been several evaluations, reports and predictions as to how this product would “weather” the test of time. In 2012, the Chicago-based Metal Construction Association (MCA) and Olympia, Wash.-based Zinc Aluminum Coaters Association (ZAC) commissioned a study to perform forensic tests at 14 existing Galvalume standing-seam metal roof sites throughout the country in varying climates and precipitation pH. The average age of these roofs was more than 30 years at the time of testing.

Initially, the sites were selected based on temperature and humidity zones throughout the U.S. As the field results were processed, however, it became apparent the expected lives of these roofs were directly dependent on the precipitation pH levels with very little correlation to temperature and humidity. The building sites chosen were located in the following states:

  • Massachusetts (2 sites)
    This Galvalume roof in Missouri is nine years old.

    This Galvalume roof in Missouri is nine-years old.


    Ohio (3 sites)
    South Carolina (2 sites)
    Georgia (1 site)
    Colorado (1 site)
    New Mexico (1 site)
    Arizona (1 site)
    Oregon (1 site)
    Wyoming (2 sites)

The study was directed by MCA and three independent consultants and their firms, which managed and performed the field work: Rob Haddock of Metal Roof Advisory Group, Colorado Springs, Colo.; Ron Dutton of Ron Dutton Consulting Services LLC, Annapolis, Md.; and me and my firm Metal Roof Consultants Inc., Cary, N.C. This group, plus Scott Kriner, MCA’s technical director, authored the actual report, which was issued by MCA and ZAC in November 2014 and is available online.

The team harvested and analyzed actual field samples of Galvalume-coated metal standing-seam roof panel materials and sealants and examined all the individual roofs’ ancillary components. Finally, it created an experienced assessment of the roofs’ conditions and associated costs to replace.

PHOTOS: METAL ROOF CONSULTANTS INC.

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Long-term Performance of Roof Systems

The April e-newsletter distributed by Roofing contained an online exclusive about sustainability. The author, Brooks Gentleman, an owner of window refurbisher Re-View, Kansas City, Mo., questioned whether we’re talking about the right things when referring to a building as sustainable. He says, “During the past 10 years, there has been a great deal of talk about green buildings and sustainability, but how many of these ‘green’ commercial or residential buildings are designed or constructed to last for centuries? When will the life cycle of the structure and the construction materials themselves become factors in the sustainability criteria? It seems to me that more effort is placed on whether a material is recyclable than whether it can perform over the long haul. It is time that the design community, manufacturers and construction processes begin to consider the life of the building if we are truly going to incorporate sustainability in our industry.” (Read the entire article.)

Gentleman’s commentary is the perfect precursor to this issue, which has a focus on the long-term performance of a roof system. Three “Tech Point” articles explain the life spans of metal, EPDM and asphalt, respectively. The authors—Chuck Howard P.E., a Roofing editorial advisor; Thomas W. Hutchinson, AIA, CSI, FRCI, RRC, RRP, a Roofing editorial advisor; and James R. Kirby, AIA—share roof-cover characteristics that achieve and industry studies that prove long-term performance.

Insulation is a component that will help extend the life of a roof system. In “Cool Roofing”, Kyle Menard, president of Bloom Roofing, Brighton, Mich., shares insight about polyisocyanurate, specifically how it contributes to long-term roof performance and why the roofing industry should educate clients about its importance as part of a roof system.

As architects, building owners and occupants increase their expectations for the environmental performance of the buildings they design, operate and dwell in, building component manufacturers have begun rolling out environmental product declarations, or EPDs. EPDs are related to life-cycle assessments and product category rules, all of which are part of an ongoing effort to provide as much transparency as possible about what goes into the products that go in and on a building. In “Environmental Trends”, Allen Barry writes about the significance of EPDs for the roofing industry.

As a longtime proponent of sustainability, it’s wonderful to see the conversation turning toward the critical issue of durability and long-term performance. Yes, specifying materials with recycled content or from sustainably managed forests is a nice consideration, but if those materials will only last a few years and must be replaced, we’re expending more energy—and money—using them. There’s nothing sustainable about that.

ECHOTape Repair Tape Now Sold by The Home Depot via HomeDepot.com

Pressure-sensitive tape supplier, ECHOtape’s full repair line will be sold online by a home improvement retailer, The Home Depot via HomeDepot.com. Launched in 2014 at the beginning of the third quarter, the repair line provides contractors with an alternative to duct tapes, and is designed to deliver solutions for repairs, sealing and waterproofing.

“We are very excited to be working with such a trusted name in home improvement like The Home Depot,” says Risa Edelstein, director of marketing for ECHOtape. “We dedicate our business to providing the ultimate tape solutions for a variety of applications and now contractors, remodelers, retrofitters and builders across the nation can purchase our performance-based repair tapes.”

ECHOtape’s comprehensive repair line is geared towards building contractors. In total, seven tapes are available now on HomeDepot.com. The products include three types of repair tapes with different color options:

  • All Purpose Repair Tape: This tape leaves little residue in comparison to a duct tape and is thick and flexible. Ideal for stretching and wrapping, this tape can be used for temporary repairs as well as for rips, tears, gashes and holes. This tape is available in clear and white.
  • All Weather Repair Tape: This tape is made with a butyl-based adhesive, which makes it sticky enough for applications to concrete, stone, wood, glass, metal, plastic, cement, plywood, and damp fabrics, and is ideal for sealing holes and cracks. It is puncture- and tear-resistant, waterproof, and will not crack in temperatures as low as -30 F or fail in temperatures as high as 200 F if applied correctly. The tape is available in white, silver and black.
  • All Leak Repair Tape: Also made with butyl-based adhesive, it is considered an extreme adhesive tape with double the stickiness of the All Weather Repair Tape. It shares many of the same qualities, including being waterproof, but is also resistant to corrosion. Because of its high level of adhesive, it can be used for repairing leaks in roof joints, skylights, RVs, pools and ponds. This tape is available in black and white.

“We are committed to making our products widely available to contractors in the U.S.,” says Edelstein. “This is an important step in increasing convenience for purchasers, and we look forward to continuing to expand our reach and product availability.”

Book Showcases 100 Years of Wagner Roofing’s Craftsmanship

Commemorating 100 years since Wagner Roofing was founded in Otto Wagner’s basement, Chuck and Sheila Wagner have written Preserving Washington History: 100 Years of Wagner Artistry.

Commemorating 100 years since Wagner Roofing was founded in Otto Wagner’s basement, Chuck and Sheila Wagner have written Preserving Washington History: 100 Years of Wagner Artistry.

For a century, many of the metropolitan Washington, D.C., region’s most distinguished roofs have had one thing in common—the handiwork of Hyattsville, Md.-based Wagner Roofing. Commemorating 100 years since Wagner Roofing was founded in Otto Wagner’s basement, Chuck and Sheila Wagner have written Preserving Washington History: 100 Years of Wagner Artistry. Published by Hamilton Books and with a foreword by Knight Kiplinger, the book is available from Amazon.com, Rowman.com and select retailers.

Surveying Wagner Roofing’s project portfolio, Preserving Washington History: 100 Years of Wagner Artistry traces the firm’s evolution into capital region experts in historic preservation and installers of slate, architectural metal and copper roofing, as well as façade restorers. The book celebrates the firm’s heritage through photographs of iconic area buildings, often from rarely seen vantages.

Oak Hill Cemetery Renwick Chapel, circa 1850, is the only known example of James Renwick Jr.’s Gothic Revival ecclesiastical design in Washington, D.C. Wagner Roofing replaced the purple Vermont slate roof and the copper built-in gutter and downspouts.

Oak Hill Cemetery Renwick Chapel, circa 1850, is the only known example of James Renwick Jr.’s Gothic Revival ecclesiastical design in Washington, D.C. Wagner Roofing replaced the purple Vermont slate roof and the copper built-in gutter and downspouts.

Wagner Roofing’s touch has graced more than 500 sites, including the Washington National Cathedral, Smithsonian Castle, U.S. Naval Academy’s Mahan Hall, 6th & I Historic Synagogue, President Lincoln’s Cottage and the Old Post Office Pavilion. Throughout Wagner Roofing’s work is a commitment to quality, customer service and artisanship, an ethos shared by the three
generations of Wagners in the trade.

A copper cornice restoration was performed on the Daughters of the American Revolution Constitution Hall in 2013-14.

A copper cornice restoration was performed on the Daughters of the American Revolution Constitution Hall in 2013-14.

“I owe much to the family members who came before me,” writes Chuck Wagner in the book’s dedication. “They dedicated themselves to providing for their families and those who worked for them during difficult and trying times. It has been a challenge walking in the footsteps of such men, but they left a legacy of excellence in workmanship and service which continues today.”

PHOTOS: Wagner Roofing

NCI Building Systems Acquires CENTRIA

NCI Building Systems Inc. (NCS), one of North America’s largest integrated manufacturers of metal products for the nonresidential building industry, has closed its previously announced acquisition of CENTRIA, a provider of architectural insulated metal panel (IMP) wall and roof systems and coil coating services, for a net cash price of $245 million. NCI intends to immediately begin cross-company integration.

Norman C. Chambers, NCI’s Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, commented, “We are pleased and proud to welcome CENTRIA into the NCI family, and expect significant opportunities for growth and margin-expansion as insulated metal panels continue to gain share in the underpenetrated North American nonresidential construction market. The acquisition of CENTRIA underscores NCI’s long-standing commitment to strengthen its position as a leading manufacturer of insulated metal panel products for the cold storage, commercial and industrial and architectural metal panel markets. We see significant opportunities to leverage CENTRIA’s position in the architectural IMP segment of the nonresidential market for the benefit of our loyal customer base and all of our stakeholders.”

As previously disclosed CENTRIA is expected to be accretive to NCI’s earnings beginning in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2015, excluding transaction related charges and amortization of short-lived intangibles, and is expected to yield annualized run-rate synergies of approximately $7 million within 18 to 24 months of closing. In addition, as a result of the CENTRIA acquisition, NCI expects to receive incremental tax basis in the assets of CENTRIA estimated to be $200 million, expected to result in reductions to NCI’s cash payments for income taxes over the next several years. After adjusting for targeted annualized synergies and the tax cash flow benefit, the adjusted purchase price is approximately 7 times CENTRIA’s trailing twelve month EBITDA as of September 30, 2014.

Barker Ends Career at Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Bill Barker concluded 27 years in the metal market working for Petersen Aluminum Corp., a career which endured such changes as consolidation on the producer side, Reynolds closing its doors, the influence of imports on pricing, numerous customers going out of business and many more challenges.

“I enjoyed my career at Petersen,” Barker says. “Management treated me very well—excellent, in fact, and I’m grateful. They allowed me the freedom to handle my accounts as I deemed necessary. There was no micro managing, which allowed me to succeed.” Barker is looking forward to a semi-retirement, and will keep his “fingers in the pie. I have an excellent relationship with my customer base.”

Petersen Aluminum CEO Mike Petersen wished Barker well. “Our good friend and long-time associate Bill Barker has retired from Petersen Aluminum Corp., completing a 27-year career that included responsibility for Chicago industrial sales, glass industry sales, and management of our stainless steel product line,” Petersen said. “Bill developed a diverse and loyal customer base through his dedicated efforts and he will be missed by his friends, colleagues and fellow employees at Petersen. As the cake we shared with him said, ‘Retire in Peace, Bill’—but better yet, retire in prosperity!”

Quality Metalcrafts/AMERICLAD Expands to Meet Customer Demand for Architectural Metal

Quality Metalcrafts LLC/AMERICLAD is excited to announce the acquisition of a second site in Rogers, Minn. The addition of the new site means the company will be operating out of a combined total of over 130,000 square feet of state-of-the-art manufacturing space in Rogers. The office portion of the new facility is currently under renovation and will serve as the company’s headquarters beginning in early 2015.

Quality Metalcrafts, LLC President, Mike Wallace, comments, “This expansion is necessary so that we can continue to efficiently support our customer base as well as the growth of the company.”

The company is a nationally recognized manufacturer of architectural metal products that cates to the architectural construction and industrial markets. Quality Metalcrafts’ AMERICLAD product line includes composite wall panels, aluminum plate wall panels, column covers, sunshades, trellis, louvers, flat sheet, standard and custom fabrication. The company is based in Rogers with another facility in Houston.