PPG Brochure Highlights 50 Years of Duranar Coatings for Metal Building Components

PPG has published “The Gold Standard in Architectural Metal Coatings: Celebrating 50 Years of DURANAR Coatings,” a 16-page brochure commemorating the 1967 introduction of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) coatings for metal building components.
 
According to Brian Knapp, PPG director, coil and building products, the booklet illustrates the historical significance of Duranar coatings.
 
“Our PVDF coating was a product that enabled architects to design metal components and facades with color,” he explains. “Until we introduced Duranar coatings, anodized aluminum was virtually the only metallic option to provide long-term performance on monumental buildings. It wasn’t until Duranar coatings were specified for several major projects that architects and building owners felt comfortable considering color finishes as a design option for metal.”
 
Over the past half-century, Duranar coatings have been specified by architects to protect and enhance some of the world’s most recognized architectural landmarks. Buildings profiled in the brochure include the Empire State Building in New York, Shanghai Tower in China, The Louvre Pyramid in Paris, and Centre Videotron in Quebec City.
 
Other prominent landmarks finished with Duranar coatings include One World Trade Center in New York; Shanghai World Financial Center in China; Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland.
 
The brochure is organized by building type—skyscrapers, landmarks, convention centers, transportation facilities, libraries and sports venues. Each building profile includes photographs, location, approximate opening date, the selected Duranar coatings color and the architect’s name.
 
In addition to publishing the brochure, PPG will highlight Duranar coatings in trade-show displays throughout the year and offer special customer promotions and giveaways. A dedicated web portal, duranar50.com, features images and descriptions of other landmark buildings finished with Duranar coatings, as well as articles, white papers and additional educational materials.
 
To learn more about the 50th anniversary of Duranar coatings or to download a copy of the 50th anniversary brochure, visit here or call (800) 258-6398.
 

MBMA Releases 2016 Annual Report

The Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) has released its 2016 Annual Report. This resource highlights the technical research, sustainability innovations, industry advocacy, safety preparations and educational programs the association has undertaken over the past year. The report provides relevant information for anyone who works with metal building systems, or who is involved in the low-rise commercial building market. It can be downloaded here.
 
“This last year was filled with growth and opportunities for our association and we are proud of all that has been accomplished,” says Brad Curtis, MBMA chair. “We have made strides in the areas of structural research, education, sustainability and fire protection. The tools we develop in these areas help designers to use metal building systems in new and exciting ways. These tools are what differentiate metal buildings as a durable building construction approach that produces economy, speed to market and single-source control.”
 
“For more than 60 years, MBMA has raised the bar for the metal building systems industry,” says Dan Walker, MBMA’s associate general manager. “MBMA members and various committees spearhead research, create innovative tools and resources, and improve industry practices and standards.”
 
The 2016 Annual Report details recent accomplishments made by MBMA, some of which include:

  • developing college capstone courses on metal building design
  • producing several new technical manuals
  • influencing code changes
  • creating educational webinars, videos and podcasts
  • completing three industry-wide Environmental Product Declarations
  • adding a new membership category to include architects and engineers

 
Also, in 2016, MBMA played a role in instituting a new Founders category in the Metal Construction Hall of Fame, which pays tribute to early industry trailblazers.
 
“The leadership that our association provides is bar none. MBMA’s members work alongside other industry experts and organizations to improve the safety, quality and durability of low-rise construction for future generations,” Walker adds.
 
MBMA’s membership represents more than $2 billion in annual shipments and accounts for nearly half of the total non-residential, low-rise construction market in the United States.
 
MBMA also provides engineering leadership through the many research programs it sponsors annually, often in coordination with universities and engineering schools throughout North America. This research is used to improve the performance, efficiency and quality of metal building systems—and serves to elevate the technology used to produce them.

MBMA Welcomes New Membership

The membership ranks of the Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) are continuing to expand. MBMA recently welcomed Panasonic Corp. of North America (Panasonic) as its 60th Associate member, and Package Steel Systems Inc. as a Building Systems member.
 
Panasonic will be represented by Jon Downey, who serves as the company’s housing and construction market development manager. Package Steel Systems will be represented by Bob Fisette, who serves as the company’s president.
 
“Our members are vital to MBMA’s continued success and influence in the building and construction industry,” says Dan Walker, PE, associate general manager of MBMA. “Each company’s unique contributions help us to advance the acceptance of metal building systems as the building solution within the low-rise commercial construction market.”
 
Based in Newark, N.J., Panasonic Corporation of North America manufactures consumer and industrial products, including building insulation solutions and products for metal roofs and gutters. The company is a subsidiary of Osaka, Japan-based Panasonic Corp., founded in 1918.
 
Package Steel Systems is located in Sutton, Mass. The metal building manufacturer serves customers in the Northeastern region of the U.S.
 
The MBMA is comprised of metal building system manufacturers and their suppliers who fabricate or manufacture materials for the industry, as well as architecture and engineering firms and service providers.

MBMA Releases Continuing Education Series

The Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA), in cooperation with Architectural Record magazine, has released a continuing education series titled, “The Benefits of Metal Building Systems from a Whole Building Perspective.” Specifically targeting architects and building professionals, the course discusses the benefits of using metal building systems by highlighting their flexibility, economical and sustainability attributes.
 
Participants will receive one AIA LU/HSW credit for completing the online course. The course is available through Architectural Record’s Continuing Education Center website.

“Metal building systems are a part of today’s architecture because they can be used for many applications. The process of creating a successful structure starts with understanding the various elements and options available, including energy, sustainability and acoustical considerations,” says Dan Walker, PE, MBMA’s associate general manager. “This course was designed around a whole-building approach to educate industry professionals about the benefits of utilizing modern metal building solutions for almost any low-rise application.”
 
The continuing education series includes an overview of the AC472 quality assurance program developed by the International Accreditation Service (IAS); the use of Athena Impact Estimator software to perform a whole-building, cradle-to-grave life-cycle analysis; and framing systems illustrations. Learning outcomes include the participant’s ability to:

  • describe the advantages of metal building systems
  • examine the benefits of writing specifications that require the IAS AC472 quality assurance program
  • identify metal building structural components and their corresponding applications
  • explain how the Athena Impact Estimator can be used to determine the sustainable benefits of metal building designs
  • analyze current metal building design options and construction processes in terms of quality, versatility, sustainability and constructability

MBMA Releases Guide for Inspecting Metal Building Systems

The Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) has released its new Guide for Inspecting Metal Building Systems, a resource intended for use by individuals who are responsible for contracting, performing, and reporting the inspection tasks related to the construction of a metal building project.
 
This guide is available for online purchase, in print or PDF format, at www.techstreet.com/mbma. The audience consists of general contractors and erectors, design professionals, building officials, owner’s representatives, and others who are involved in project delivery.
 
Input for the guide was provided by MBMA members as well as representatives from the Metal Building Contractors and Erectors Association. The result is a publication designed to help eliminate misunderstandings and lead to shorter punch lists, efficient project delivery, and quality construction of metal buildings.
 
Depending on the project and jurisdiction, building code and contractually required inspections may be necessary, as well as other inspections such as owner acceptance and insurance evaluations. The scope of the guide focuses on inspecting newly constructed metal building systems, including primary framing, secondary framing, and metal roof and wall cladding. It also overviews standards on materials common to the building envelope, such as windows, doors, skylights, and insulation materials. 
 
Dustin Cole, PE, serves on MBMA’s Technical Committee and chaired the task group that developed the MBMA handbook. He presented information on this publication at the 2016 METALCON convention. He discussed the different qualities of metal buildings, focusing on the function of components that comprise metal building systems and inspection requirements found in the building code.
 
“As metal building projects and building codes continue to grow more complex, inspection becomes more necessary and expected. Knowing what is required and what to look for when performing an inspection helps reduce delays and decreases costs,” says Dan Walker, PE, associate general manager of MBMA. “The Metal Building Manufacturer Association’s Guide for Inspecting Metal Building Systems will benefit anyone who is responsible for evaluating new or existing metal building construction.”
 
The guide can be purchased at this website for $60 for non-members and $36 for MBMA members.

Roof Hugger Celebrates 25th Anniversary

In 1991, two developer/contactors and longtime friends, Red McConnohie and Dale Nelson, began a part-time business to manufacture and distribute structurally sound sub-purlins for installing a new metal roof directly over an existing metal roof. The idea came about because McConnohie owned a lease building that needed its roof to be replaced. After a few design sketches using a factory-notch concept with some ingenuity, the original Hugger sub-purlin came alive. McConnohie got his building reroofed and proposed to Nelson that they start a business together selling this innovative new product. So, they set off on a journey, which has lasted 25 years, and now has covered more than 70 million square feet of existing roofs nationally and abroad. The company is the brand Roof Hugger Inc.

The trek was not always that easy because the product is designed to fit over and around the major ribs of the existing panels. Have you ever thought about how many different metal roof profiles are out there? Hundreds, if not thousands. You have ribbed panels in a multitude of spacing and heights from 6 to 13 inches, there are corrugated panels with corrugations spaced from 2.25 to 4 inches, and of course, there are standing seams. These also widely varied because of the vertical and trapezoidal seam configurations, rib-to-rib spacing and heights and with or without standoff clips. Today, Roof Hugger has built a library full of manufacturer literature, both from the old days and the more recent. They refer to this library countless times during a given year but even to this day, they are given a previously unknown panel from a contractor or building owner needing to reroof an existing metal building.

Not only do the profiles and variations of existing metal roofs make this niche roof replacement market challenging at times, but because of the new stringent code requirements, you have panel testing to contend with, as well. Every manufacturer today, producing metal roofing, has and will continue to have their systems tested for performance. The most utilized test standard is known in metal construction as the “Standard Test Method for Structural Performance of Sheet Metal Roof and Siding Systems by Uniform Static Air Pressure Difference” or ASTM E-1592. Without it, it is extremely difficult to engineer roofing products to meet specified building code requirements for given wind speeds. It is not widely understood but each metal roof’s testing can and does vary from its counterparts although they frequently can look almost identical. This is due to seam design, clip design, metal thickness, design specifications and manufacturing limitations. Because of this, Roof Hugger began testing in 1996 and now has numerous metal roofs that have been tested over their sub-purlin systems. They have an (FM) Factory Mutual approval, as well as several (FL#) Florida Product Approved assemblies.

As Roof Hugger celebrates its 25th year, the Hugger team located outside Tampa, Fla., is excited to carry the “Hugger” brands on into the future. McConnohie passed in 2013 at the age of 87, and Roof Hugger is a big part of Red’s legacy, but Dale and Jan Nelson, now owners of Roof Hugger, continue to work relentlessly to make the Hugger stable of products better than any other metal-over-metal retrofit roof system available. Jan Nelson recently commented that “they are so fortunate to have met and grown to know the fabulous people in the metal construction industry via trade shows and organizational meetings. She went on to say, “We have gained an extended family that is surely the best gift of this journey and it puts a smile on my face daily.” Dale Nelson said, “I can’t believe it’s been 25 years. It’s been one heck of an enjoyable ride.” Dale Nelson was recently elected chairman of the Metal Construction Association (MCA), which he is no stranger to this kind of work. He has committed much of his life to volunteer work in both his private life, as well as in business activities.

Roof Hugger now has four production locations in Florida, Indiana, Texas and Washington. Three of their sub-purlin profiles can ship within two to three days and others are made-to-order to ship within 10 to 15 days. Roof Hugger is specified by numerous levels of local, state and federal government agencies, especially the U.S. Military. A recent look at their shipments, found that more than 3 million square feet have been installed at more than 70 domestic military facilities. They provide quotes in hours and a live voice always answers the phone. Prior to Red’s passing, if you were lucky he would answer the phone with a loud “ROOF HUGGER – McCONNOHIE”, and when you call today you will still get an equally enthusiastic greeting from the Roof Hugger crew of Jan, Bill, DJ or Dale.

MBMA Releases EPDs for Primary Rigid Framing, Secondary Framing and Metal Cladding

In order to meet the increasing demand for unbiased data about the environmental impacts of commercial construction, the Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) has released Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for three metal building product categories: primary rigid framing, secondary framing, and metal cladding for roofs and walls.

MBMA partnered with UL Environment (ULE) to develop and certify these EPDs, which summarize the cradle-to-gate environmental impacts of a metal building system. The cradle-to-gate method is used to describe the impact of producing products, from raw material extraction, through processing, fabrication and up to the finished product leaving the manufacturing facility.

EPDs provide specifiers, builders and other industry professionals with transparent third-party documentation of the environmental impacts of products, including global warming potential, ozone depletion, acidification and other factors. The LEED V4 green building rating system encourages the use of EPDs, which are important for earning credits in the program.

MBMA has been studying the sustainable attributes of metal buildings for several years, starting with the collection of the industry’s LCI data, and using it to perform whole-building LCA analysis to compare its products to other forms of construction. Through these studies, MBMA has shown that the structural efficiency of metal building systems is a key contributor to their sustainable performance when compared to conventional construction.

“There is a growing need to simplify and harmonize the decision-making processes for architects and specifiers that must choose building materials for construction,” says Dan Walker, associate general manager of MBMA. “MBMA members are dedicated to educating others about the sustainable performance of metal building systems, and these EPDs will effectively do that for the design community.”

Metal building systems are custom-engineered and fabricated in accordance with strict quality assurance standards, and with almost no scrap generated. Designers are beginning to realize that the structural efficiency of this approach brings tangible benefits, from a sustainability and cost-savings perspective. The completion of these EPDs gives designers the confidence that they are making a wise choice from financial and environmental aspects.

MBMA’s EPDs can now be found on the UL Environment website.

Metal Roofing and Siding Enhance Waste Collection Building

The Elk Grove Special Waste Collection Center celebrate the industrial chic nature of dealing with hazardous waste products with metal roofing and wall panels.

Metal roofing and siding help the Elk Grove Special Waste Collection Center celebrate the industrial chic nature of dealing with hazardous waste products.

The city of Elk Grove, Calif.’s Special Waste Collection Center opened in April 2014 with a commitment to a cleaner and greener community. The center, which features AEP Span’s architectural metal panels, has earned LEED Gold Certification and, to date, has accepted nearly 300,000 pounds, or 130 tons, of recyclable materials diverted from local landfills.

“With the Elk Grove Special Waste Collection Center project, we wanted to express and celebrate the industrial chic nature of dealing with hazardous waste products at the same time creating a safe, warm and comfortable environment for the center staff,” says Eric Glass, AIA, LEED AP and principal of Santa Rosa, Calif.-based firm Glass Architects. “The project is designed to take a heavily abused, neglected and contaminated site and revitalize it, turning it into a protected habitat.”

“Metal siding and roofing products were a natural choice for this project,” Glass adds. “The inherent durability and recycled content material speaks to the overall mission of this facility. The horizontal and vertical fluted siding creates a strong form and texture, enhancing the building’s character.”

The Elk Grove Special Waste Collection Center project features AEP Span’s 24-gauge Reverse Box Rib in ZACtique II on the lower section of the wall application; 24-gauge HR-36 in Metallic Silver in the upper wall and canopy application; 24-gauge Prestige Series in Metallic Silver in a soffit application; 16-inch, 24-gauge SpanSeam in Hemlock Green in a roof application; and 24-gauge Curved Select Seam in Hemlock Green for the curved canopy application.

The $4.6 million center is the first, and only, facility of its kind in the nation powered by solar energy.

The $4.6 million center is the first, and only, facility of its kind in the nation powered by solar energy.

The $4.6 million center is the first, and only, facility of its kind in the nation powered by solar energy. Since its grand opening in April 2014, the center has been used by more than 8,000 customers to dispose of paint, cleaning supplies, electronics and other household recyclables. The center has also received nearly 1,000 visitors to the reuse room, which offers a wide variety of new or partially used products for free.

Project Details

Project: Elk Grove Special Waste Collection Center, Elk Grove, Calif.
Architect: Glass Architects, Santa Rosa, Calif.
General Contractor: Bobo Construction Inc., Elk Grove
Installer: MCM Roofing, McClellan, Calif., (916) 333-5294
Manufacturer of Architectural Metal Panels: AEP Span

MBMA and the American Iron and Steel Institute Provide Faculty Fellowships

In a groundbreaking educational initiative, the Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) is providing faculty fellowships in cooperation with the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). These awards will expedite development of a model program that partners the metal building industry with undergraduate engineering and architectural faculty and students. The fellowships will assist each selected faculty in developing a senior design class, referred to as a capstone course, with the focus on a metal building project.

Grant recipients are:

  • Dr. Justin Marshall – Auburn University
  • Dr. Ron Ziemian – Bucknell University
  • Dr. Mehdi Jalalpour – Cleveland State University
  • Dr. Michael Seek – Old Dominion University
  • Dr. John Cleary – University of South Alabama
  • Prof. Marci S. Uihlein – University of Illinois School of Architecture

“Even though metal buildings account for approximately half of all nonresidential low-rise construction in the U.S., most engineering/architecture students are not introduced to this form of construction as part of their formal education,” says W. Lee Shoemaker, Ph.D., P.E., MBMA’s director of research and engineering. “Our intent is to introduce metal building design and construction practices into the curriculum and foster an industry/academic partnership that provides real world experience for undergraduates.”

“This initiative has the ability to change our industry,” says MBMA Chairman, Tom Gilligan. “The more we educate future engineers, architects, contractors and planners, the more they will recognize the beneficial attributes of metal building systems techniques. As we train the next generation of designers, we can expect the industry to achieve even greater acceptance and market share.”

“MBMA will give the faculty who were awarded the fellowships the latitude to develop a program that works best considering their needs and resources,” says Shoemaker. “However, we are also interested in making the design experience as realistic as possible for the students. We would like this capstone to be more similar to a student’s first job, rather than their last college course.”

With regard to the engineering curriculum, Shoemaker stresses that appropriate standards and multiple realistic constraints within the capstone should prepare students for engineering practice in accordance with the expectations of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). “MBMA would like the model programs to address as many of the ABET Student Outcomes as possible,” he says.

ABET outcomes are:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  • An ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • An ability to communicate effectively.
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context.
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning.
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

The selected university faculty will carry out the development of a capstone course at each of their schools in 2015-16, then make adjustments and improvements to the program based on their experiences. The final product will be a model capstone course program that is a combination of the best ideas created by the grant recipients. The final program will be made available to colleges and universities nationwide in 2017.

From Screw-down to Standing-seam Metal Roofing

Time to reroof an old screw-down metal roof? Are you thinking about upgrading to a new standing-seam roof? Great idea! Today’s new standing-seam roofs are truly state-of-the-art; available in many profiles and finishes; and, more importantly, address many of the issues encountered in older generation screw-down metal roofs.

Caulk, roof coating and tar patches were used to cover leaking fasteners and panel end laps.

Caulk, roof coating and tar patches were used to cover leaking fasteners and panel end laps.

The screw-down metal roof and wall panel has been the backbone of the metal building industry since its inception and still represents a significant part of the total market. Screw-down panels are lightweight, durable, inexpensive and strong enough to span up to 5 feet between structural supports. Screw-down roofs and walls also have a wonderful physical property: The panels can and frequently are used as “diaphragm bracing,” securely holding the building’s roof purlins and wall girts in position, adding rigidity to the structure in much the same way drywall strengthens stud walls. This is a huge material—and labor—cost saver!

The early systems were not without problems, however; much of the technology we take for granted today did not exist in the early years of pre-engineered buildings. Many roofs during the late ’60s thru early ’80s were installed using 10-year life fasteners to secure a 30-plus-year life roof.

The fastener issue seems crazy today given the numerous inexpensive, long-life, weathertight, self-drilling screws available. Back when I started in the metal building industry, you could have the newly developed “self-drilling” cadmium fasteners or “self-tapping” stainless. Self-tapping meant you had to pre-drill a hole in the panel and purlin to install it—a much slower and more expensive process. Most of us used the less expensive but (unknown to us at the time) fairly short-life cadmium-coated fasteners and often never provided the option of a stainless upgrade to our customers.

Another shortcoming with screw-down roof panels is that, generally speaking, screw-down panels on metal buildings should be a maximum length of about 80 feet. Longer roof-panel runs frequently suffered rips or slots in the metal caused by expansion and contraction. Metal panels expand and contract at a rate of about 1 inch per 100 feet of panel run. This is normally absorbed by the back and forth rolling of the roof purlin and some panel bowing, but after 80 feet or so they can no longer absorb the movement resulting in trauma to the panels and trim. I have frequently seen this 80-foot limit exceeded.

a rusted fastener has caused the surrounding metal to corrode and fail.

A rusted fastener has caused the surrounding
metal to corrode and fail.

Standing-seam panels eliminate both of these shortcomings. The panels are attached to “sliding clips”. These clips are screwed to the purlins and seamed into the side laps of the panels securing them and thus the panels have very few, if any, exposed fasteners. The clips maintain a solid connection with the structure of the building while still allowing the panels, which can be 150 feet or longer, to move with expansion and contraction forces without damage.

This is great news for the building owner: You’re providing a more watertight roof, few if any penetrations, and expansion and contraction ability. It does come with a catch, however; standing-seam panels, because they move, do not provide diaphragm strength. The building’s roof purlins must have significantly more bridging and bracing to keep them in their correct and upright position. This is automatically taken care of in new building design but when it comes time to reroof an older building, removing the existing screw-down roof could remove the diaphragm bracing it once provided and make the building structurally unsound. Yes, that’s bad!

PHOTOS: ROOF HUGGER INC.

Pages: 1 2 3