ATAS Names New Director of Interior Business Development

ATAS International promoted Kevin Cox, CSI, CDT, to the position of Director of Interior Business Development.  Prior to this new position, Cox was the Product Representative for ATAS covering the territory of North Carolina, South Carolina, and Southern Virginia since 2016.

Kevin has over 25 years of experience in the commercial construction industry, including positions within operations and in sales and estimating for a large commercial interior contractor.  He has held positions in architectural business development and ran his own commercial contracting company for half a decade. Kevin has extensive knowledge of exterior and interior wall construction, as well as interior ceilings and room acoustics.  He is a board member of the Construction Specifications Institute’s Raleigh-Durham chapter and has obtained CSI’s Construction Documents Technologist (CDT) accreditation.

To complement this new market focus, an interior applications brochure was created to highlight the many ways in which ATAS metal panels can be used within a building.  From a functional and aesthetically pleasing linear ceiling system, to a wide variety of attractive wall panel options, a building’s interior can benefit from the beauty and durability of metal.  Curved, tapered, texture, color and custom capabilities expand options and bring design ideas to life.  Acoustical sound control systems are available for ceilings and walls, and perforated panels are often used in sound dampening applications.  ATAS Gaten Series perforated panels are available in six standard hole size patterns, as well as in custom patterns and hole sizes, to add visual appeal as well as acoustical functionality.

For more information, visit www.atas.com

Meticulous Preparation Sets Up Restoration Project for Success

Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

Officials at Roma High School in Roma, Texas, knew they needed a new roof. The tile roof on the main complex was more than 25 years old, and some components were clearly failing. They didn’t realize that many of the leaks and resulting wall deterioration were caused by other problems as well. Luckily, they reached out to design and construction professionals who did their homework, diagnosed all of the key problems, and developed a plan to fix them. The crowning touch of the building envelope restoration plan was a beautiful standing seam metal roof, and the success of the project is proof that hard work pays off not only in the classroom, but on top of it.

The Consultant

As its building envelope consultant, Roma Independent School District chose Amtech Solutions Inc., headquartered in Dallas, Texas. The full-service architectural, engineering, and building envelope consulting firm has been in business since 1982. Working out of the company’s Rio Grand Valley (RGV) office located in Pharr, Texas, Amtech Solutions inspected and evaluated the entire site and reviewed legacy documents to identify the underlying issues.

They found quite a few, notes Michael Hovar, AIA, RRO, LEED AP, a senior architect and the general manager of the company’s RGV office. “They thought all they had was a roofing problem,” he notes. “But we saw right away that not properly managing water off the roof was the cause of wall deterioration, which then became leaks into the building. Our experience with the entire envelope and all facets of design and construction really helped us on this one.”

Roma High School in Roma, Texas, underwent a three-phase building envelope restoration plan in 2016-2017. After the walls were repaired and restored, the roof and mechanical equipemt were replaced. Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

Amtech Solutions put together a presentation for the school board to detail what they discovered and the plan they proposed to remedy the situation. The company also worked with the school district to help develop a budget.
The restoration plan was split up into three phases. The first phase focused on restoring the walls and windows. The second phase encompassed roof replacement and installing new mechanical equipment. The third phase involved improving drainage, grading and other site repairs.

Amtech Solutions decided not to bid the project out to a general contractor, but rather to bid each phase separately. “We decided to split it up into stages and do it logically, starting with the walls first,” Hovar says. “For the walls, we got restoration contractors who specialize in wall restoration work.”

Restoration Services Inc. (RSI) of Houston, Texas handled the first phase in the summer, as the wall repairs would be louder and more disruptive to students. The roof replacement project was scheduled for the fall. “Once all of the stuff on the ground was done, that allowed us to do the re-roofing work throughout the school year, which also helped the price,” notes Hovar. “Our experience has always been that if we have good cooperation with the contractors and the school staff, at the end of the job they end up being best friends. And that’s exactly what happened. At the end of the job, they were sad to see the roofers go.”

Amtech Solutions convinced the school district the plan would work. “It took some coordination, communication and cooperation, and it took a motivated owner that was willing to do this and trust us,” Hovar says. “They looked to us for guidance, and we said, ‘We do this all the time. We do roofing projects throughout the year, occupied and unoccupied, and we do it in a way that respects what the occupant’s needs are.’”

When it came time to specify the roof system, school board members were divided; one faction wanted to install a new tile roof, and the other wanted to go with metal. “The interesting thing is, for the historical architecture of the area, both of those roofs are appropriate, so from the standpoint of historical significance, either one works,” Hovar says. “In the end, it was quite a bit more expensive to utilize tile than it was to utilize a metal roof.”

The Roof Systems

The decision was made to go with a standing seam metal roof from McElroy Metal on the vast majority of the complex, including the main roof, the gymnasium, and two freestanding structures — the art and industrial arts buildings — that had been added over the years. The main tile roof was removed and replaced with McElroy’s 138T Panel, a 16-inch-wide, 24-gauge panel in Brite Red. McElroy’s 238T Panel, a 24-inch-wide, 24-gauge panel, was specified for the gym, as well as the art and industrial arts buildings. In a cost-saving measure, the color on the gym roof was changes to Galvalume Plus. In all, more than 233,000 square feet of metal roofing was installed.

Before

“The reason we picked this roof system is we’ve had a lot of great experience with it,” Hovar says. “We love that panel because they can actually bring the roll former to the jobsite. That gives the roofing contractor a lot more options on how he can load the roof and sequence the job. The other beauty of this panel is that it has unlimited movement. The panels itself slides back and forth over a fixed clip. It also flashes like a dream.”

Low-slope roof areas adjacent to the gym were replaced with a two-ply modified bitumen system from Siplast. CPI Daylighting manufactured a new skylight for the atrium.

As part of the roofing phase, gutters and downspouts were added. “There was nothing controlling the water before on this project,” Hovar says. “We designed a gutter system with expansion joints as per SMACNA guidelines. The contractor made absolutely beautiful shop-welded aluminum downspout boots.”

The most crucial detail was a custom-made saddle that solved the problem of water infiltration at the transition between the roof and walls on the wings. “This ultimately simple solution addressed one of the major design flaws that plagued the facility from the first days of occupancy,” Hovar notes. “We modeled the three-dimensional design of those saddles, and the contractor welded them in his shop. He fabricated them out of .080 aluminum and they were seamless. The restoration contractor had already installed all of the through-wall flashing, so all the roofer had to do was put counterflashing in and do his work around it. He was able to fly without being slowed down by a mason on the job.”

The Roofing Contractor

The roofing phase of the project was handled by Rio Roofing, headquartered in Harlingen, Texas. The company primarily installs low-slope and metal roofs, and its focus is on large commercial and institutional projects. ““We do nearly 90 percent public bonded work,” notes Hedley Hichens, vice president of Rio Roofing. “We found out that whether it’s a small job or a big job, the paperwork is still the same, so we try to make it worthwhile.”

The company worked on the Roma High School project for about a year, wrapping up the roofing phase of the project in November 2017.

After the structure’s main roof was removed, the tile was replaced with a standing seam metal roof featuring McElroy’s 138T Panel in Brite Red. Photos: Debby Amador, Roma Police Department

The decision was made to tackle the wings on the main roof first. “During the pre-con meetings, we met with the principal and the superintendent and asked, ‘Which wings are the worst?’” Hichens notes. “There was one wing that was the most problematic, so we started with that area first.”

Rio Roofing began by tearing off the existing tile roof. “There were about 1,925 squares of concrete tile we had to remove,” Hichens notes. “We had crews on the roof tearing off tile, crews on the ground palletizing the tile and storing it in the parking lot.”

As crew members removed the old tile and felt, others followed behind and installed polyisocyanurate insulation and Polystick MTS, a waterproofing underlayment designed for high-temperature applications. “We did 40 or 50 squares a day, moving down the wing,” Hichens says. “We dried in the whole school. Then we came back with the 138 panel.”

On top of the gym and other buildings that received the 238T panel, the existing metal roofs were left in place. “We put flute fill on top of the old panels. Then we screwed down 3/8-inch Securock, primed it and put the Polyglass underlayment down on top of that,” Hichens explains. “That 24-inch panel is a great panel to work with because every time you put one down, you’re 2 feet closer to finishing.”

Installing the New Roofs

The school’s main roof covers a central hub with eight wings coming off of its octagonal skylight. Where the wings tie together, access was limited.

“It was a tight squeeze,” Hichens says. “Getting in there and getting out was difficult. I think our fork lift only cleared one of the walkways by 2 or 3 inches. It’s a big campus, but the layout was difficult at the school.”

Once the wings were dried in, sheet metal crews installed the edge metal and 4,000 linear feet of gutters. They also started forming the panels.

Typically, Rio Roofing lifts the roll former to the roof edge, but it was difficult to get a large lift next to the building, so in this case the roll former was left on the ground. It was moved from wing to wing as the job progressed. “We used a New Tech roll former on this project,” Hichens says, “We would put the roll former parallel to each wing and store the panels on the ground in each area.”

Panels were hemmed and notched using a Swenson Snap Table Pro and lifted to the roof with a fork lift and a special cradle. Crews used a hand seamer to set temporary seams and followed up with a robotic seamer from D.I. Roof Seamers. “The panels are easy to install,” Hichens says. “You get about four guys 10 feet apart to engage the panels and clips and you just keep going. At the end of the day crews put the seam caps on.”

On the low-slope areas, Rio Roofing installed approximately 47,000 square feet of the Siplast two-ply SBS modified system, which was torched down over new lightweight concrete. “For their size, the low-slope areas had a ton of mechanical equipment and ductwork up there,” notes Hichens. “There were a lot of key details.”

Rio Roofing custom-manufactured numerous curbs and details, including the saddles over problem areas at the walls. “We have a full welding shop,” Hichens notes. “We have a full machine shop. We make all of our own curbs here, so there is no lead time for ordering curbs, and we are sure they’ll fit.”

Teamwork

Work on the project has now moved on to a fourth phase: installing translucent panels over the swimming pool. Hovar believes teamwork was the key to the project’s success. “We had such a good contracting team, we did good field work to begin with, and we had an understanding owner,” he says. “Designing it wasn’t easy, but thankfully our experience helped. We just had a really good team to execute it, all the way around. That’s what makes for a great, project, right? When everybody is invested in a good outcome, they always support everybody else.”

Communication was also essential, and Building Information Modeling (BIM) helped keep everyone on the same page. “We modeled the project on our BIM software, and it helped everyone understand the scope and challenges. The BIM model allowed the owner see exactly what the project would look like, and it helped the contractor understand the staging and logistical challenges before the project was bid,” Hovar says. “There were no surprises.”

TEAM

Architect and Consultant: Amtech Solutions Inc., Pharr, Texas, www.amtechsls.com
Roofing Contractor: Rio Roofing, Harlingen Texas
Wall Restoration Contractor: RSI-Restoration Services Inc., Houston, Texas, www.rsi-restorationservices.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System
Metal Panels: 138T panel (16 inches wide, 24 gauge) and 238T Panel (24 inches wide, 24 gauge), McElroy Metal, www.mcelroymetal.com
Underlayment: Polystick MTS, Polyglass, www.polyglass.us
Cover Board: Securock, USG, www.usg.com
Skylight: CPI Daylighting, www.cpidaylighting.com

Low-Slope Roof System
Modified Bitumen Membrane: Paradiene SBS, Siplast, www.siplast.com

Fasteners Designed to Attach Sheeting over Rigid Insulation

Triangle Fastener Corporation expands their line of BLAZER Drill Screws with new sizes designed to attach metal panels over rigid insulation. These unique screws have two different threads with a gap in between that eliminates jacking of the panel during installation.

Features and benefits:

  • A special ¼-14 “high thread” under the screw’s head secures the metal panel tightly against the head for optimal seal
  • Unique unthreaded section eliminates the “jacking” of the panel during installation, improving the drilling and tapping performance
  • BLAZER 3 drill point for fast penetration with less effort
  • Lengths: 1-7/8-inch, 2-3/8-inch, 3-1/4-inch and 4-inch
  • TRI-SEAL 1,000-hours salt spray coating provides over 20-times more corrosion protection than screws with commercial zinc plated
  • Available with a zinc alloy cap or stainless steel cap providing corrosion resistance in harsh environments

For more information, visit www.trianglefastener.com.

Metal Barrel Roof Tops the Rebels’ New Basketball Arena

The Pavilion at Ole Miss seats 9,500 fans.

The Pavilion at Ole Miss seats 9,500 fans. The building’s signature is its standing seam metal roof, which was manufactured by ACI Building Systems. Photos: Professional Roofing Contractors Inc.

The Pavilion at Ole Miss is a multi-purpose facility that is most famous for hosting the University of Mississippi’s basketball team. The arena cost approximately $97 million to build and seats 9,500 fans. The building’s signature arched metal panel roof was designed to complement the curved entrance and blend in with other architectural features on the university’s campus in Oxford, Miss.

Professional Roofing Contractors of Shelbyville, Tenn., was originally called in to assist with estimating the cost of the structure’s main roof, as well as a membrane roof system on the lower level. Upon final bid results, the decision was made to proceed with a standing seam metal roof on the upper portion of the building and a PVC roof on the lower level. Professional Roofing was the successful low roof bidder and selected ACI Building Systems to provide the standing seam roof materials and Sika Sarnafil to provide the PVC membrane roof materials. Professional Roofing installed both systems, with Jose Martinez as the crew leader for the membrane roofing portion and Dale Jones in charge of the metal roofing crew.

Larry W. Price, president of Professional Roofing, and Jonathan Price, the company’s vice president and the production manager on the project, oversaw the installation of 79,500 square feet of standing seam metal roofing and 46,500 square feet of PVC. There wasn’t much room for staging material on the jobsite, which didn’t give the company much room to maneuver. For the main roof, bundles of pre-cut metal panels were trailered in by ACI and loaded to the roof by crane.

“Logistics were complicated,” notes Larry Price. “Just getting a big enough crane in there and lifting the panels was difficult. Once we got the panels on the roof and they were situated, the roofers could just move ahead.”

Photos: Professional Roofing Contractors Inc.

Photos: Professional Roofing Contractors Inc.

Panels were installed with a 2-inch-high, double-lock standing seam, which was completed using a self-propelled mechanical seamer from D.I. Roof Seamers. The metal panels were curved into place by crews on the roof, who installed them over the staggered metal deck after it was covered with two 2-inch layers of polyiso insulation and Carlisle’s WIP 300 HT self-adhered underlayment. “The metal deck was segmented,” notes Jonathan Price. “We had to bridge some of those sections to make a nice, smooth curve.”

The scope of work included a large gutter at the roof edge. The gutter was 3 feet high and 2 feet wide, and crews from Professional Roofing flashed the gutter and lined it with the same Sika Sarnafil PVC used on the lower roof.

On the mezzanine level, crews installed a vapor barrier and mechanically fastened two 2-inch layers of polyiso insulation, as well as some tapered insulation for drainage. Once that work was completed, the 60-mil PVC was applied.

“Everything went pretty smoothly,” says Jonathan Price. “Logistics are usually tight on a new construction project, but once we adjusted to that, we just had to cope with the weather.”

“We had a lot of hot days and some rainy days,” Larry Price remembers. “Mississippi in the summer can get hot, hot, hot—and when it’s not hot, it’s raining.”

TEAM

Architect: AECOM, Kansas City, Mo.
General Contractor: BL Harbert International, Birmingham, Ala., Blharbert.com
Roofing Contractor: Professional Roofing Contractors Inc., Shelbyville, Tenn., Professionalroofingcontractors.com
Metal Roof Panel Manufacturer: ACI Building Systems, LLC, ACIbuildingsystems.com
PVC Roof Manufacturer: Sika Sarnafil, USA.sarnafil.sika.com

Latest Addition to SnapTable Line Is Easily Transportable

Swenson Shear's Eave MasterSwenson Shear introduces the Eave Master, the latest addition to the company’s SnapTable collection. Eave Master is designed to notch and hem eave cuts in metal panels between 12 inches and 24 inches wide. According to the manufacturer, the product provides a consistent cut on straight runs and is ideal for use in any commercial job. It weighs 125 pounds, and is designed to be manually lifted by two people and easily transported in the bed of a pickup truck.

The Eave Master features an inch ruler on its notchers that allows for an easy-to-measure hem line, as well as a quick-change notching station for right and left panel runs. The machine is designed to be the perfect complement to the Towable SnapTable Pro.

Metl-Span Hosts Grand Opening Ceremony for Its New Production Facility

Metl-Span, a manufacturer of insulated metal panels, hosted a grand opening ceremony for its new production facility in Hamilton, Ontario.

More than 150 guests came to celebrate the opening with Metl-Span. Guests came from across Canada and traveled from as far south as Texas to be in attendance. Many were able to see how Metl-Span insulated metal panels were produced for the first time on the guided plant tours.

The Metl-Span plant, located at 430 Sherman Avenue North, employs more than 20 full-time workers and is currently producing the Mesa, Light Mesa, Striated and Fluted profiles.

“With Metl-Span now operating in Canada, our customers here and in the northeastern and north central U.S. can benefit from lower delivery costs for all of their metal panel needs,” says Steve Zirkel, president of Metl-Span. “We are also very excited to be a part of the Hamilton community and provide job opportunities and business here.”

The ceremony included an official ribbon cutting with representatives from Metl-Span; the Hamilton Port Authority; NCI, Metl-Span’s parent company; and Robertson Building Systems, also an NCI company, invited to participate. The ribbon was cut by Metl-Span plant manager, Jeff Fountain.

Metl-Span started production in the 24,000-square-foot facility, located at the Port of Hamilton, in March.

“Customers will realize significant savings in terms of turnaround and delivery times,” Zirkel says. “In an industry where time literally means money, this advantage is tremendous.”

The new Hamilton production plant is currently producing Metl-Span Mesa, Light Mesa, Striated and Fluted insulated metal panels.

Metal Panels Include Polyiso Core

Green Span Profiles has added RidgeLine, a patented 2 3/8-inch-tall mechanically seamed roofing panel, covering 42 inches, with thickness options of 2 1/2, 3, 4 and 5 inches.

Green Span Profiles has added RidgeLine, a patented 2 3/8-inch-tall mechanically seamed roofing panel, covering 42 inches, with thickness options of 2 1/2, 3, 4 and 5 inches.

Green Span Profiles has added RidgeLine, a patented 2 3/8-inch-tall mechanically seamed roofing panel, covering 42 inches, with thickness options of 2 1/2, 3, 4 and 5 inches. The core is a continuously poured-in-place, polyisocyanurate insulating foam. Exterior and interior metal panels are available in 26-, 24- and 22-gauge Galvalume/G90 galvanized and stainless steel. The exterior finish is standard gloss PVDF coating. RidgeLine panels can be used on slopes as low as 1/2:12 and are available in standard lengths, measuring 12 to 53 feet, with custom lengths available on demand. The panel offers nominal R-8 per inch of insulation thickness; R-20 for the 2 1/2-inch panel.

METALCON Celebrates Its 25th Anniversary

True to its 25-year record of being a great place to introduce new products, METALCON drew eager buyers to see all the new offerings from more than 260 exhibiting companies.

“Celebrating METALCON’s 25th anniversary in Tampa gave us a great setting to celebrate the accomplishments within our industry. Best of all, the exhibiting companies had great responses from attendees. These companies expressed their satisfaction with this year’s show by signing up for next year. We already have 55,000 square feet of space committed for 2016 in Baltimore. This has been a great location for us so we’re looking forward to a repeat of our very successful 2008 event held at the Baltimore Convention Center,” notes METALCON Show Director Claire Kilcoyne.

METALCON is the metal construction industry’s largest international tradeshow and conference for metal construction products, technologies and solutions. The 25th annual event took place Oct. 14-16 at the Tampa Convention Center in Tampa, Fla.

Quality and consistency of attendees were bywords for many exhibitors at the 2015 show, such as Bo Newman, business development manager for D.I. Roof Seamers, Corinth, Miss., who says: “METALCON has always been a top trade show for us and this year was no exception. Our booth was filled with visitors throughout the show. The contacts we made were not only record breaking in number, but they were clearly buyers. The vast majority of them are all about business—seriously intent on putting our products and services to work for them.”

He adds: “In addition to our own marketing efforts, we took full advantage of METALCON’s great marketing tools. We participated in the MCA Roofing Championship Games, as well as the “Association at Work for You” area. This added exposure was key in the overwhelming response to our new products—particularly the new D.I. Curver 1000 and Cap Bender. These machines are used to field form a radius on common snap-lock panels with narrow batten caps. We look forward to next year’s METALCON where we will once again present the latest innovations in panel seaming technology.”

Larger equipment suppliers, such as AXYZ Automation, also drew crowds. “There was a lot of interest in our PANELBUILDER CNC Router featuring our new software and print head. We saw very strong prospects and generated a lot of business here. METALCON has always been successful for us because many of our suppliers are here and our customers, installers of wall cladding (ACM), are also in abundance at METALCON. Every year this is a good source of business for us. The new PANELBUILDER 16 is the latest combined router and software solution in our company’s CNC router systems for panel fabrication,” says Greg Jenkins, vice president of sales, AXYZ Automation Inc., Burlington, Ontario, Canada.

New metal panel systems were also a big hit. Ken Gieseke, vice president, marketing, McElroy Metal, Bossier City, La., notes that: “Traffic to our booth was consistently good. Our new product, the 138T Shingle Recover System, was a real draw. Our target is the retrofit arena and our product was developed based on studies of the ASV concept. We did a lot of electronic promotion through METALCON’s offerings, as well as industry publications.”

Lee Ann M. Slattery, sales support manager, ATAS International Inc., Allentown, Pa., echoes his comments. “ATAS International had many visitors who were interested in our new Isoleren insulated metal panels. It was a good event at which to announce this new product offering. Participating in the Learning Zones helped ATAS educate contractors on installation details related to flashing. ATAS has participated as an exhibitor at METALCON for the past 25 years. It is where we establish new relationships and meet with customers and suppliers that we have worked with for many years, and we look forward to future shows,” she says.

For some companies, such as software supplier AppliCad, METALCON is primarily an educational opportunity. “Our customer base has access to all kinds of information so their perception is that they don’t need trade shows to make a decision. The U.S. market is critical for us and we feel our role is to educate roofers through these shows. This is the only way to do it and this show was better than I expected. So we’ll be back next year,” says Ray Smith, managing director of AppliCad, headquartered in Melbourne, Australia. AppliCad has developed software for simplified roof modeling in 3-D for roofing and cladding estimating throughout the Americas, Africa, Middle East, Asia and Europe.

Bill Zayas, senior account executive, SnoGem, McHenry, Ill., also had a rewarding experience in educating prospects and showing them new products. “We previewed our Universal Composite Panel System. There’s no better venue than METALCON to introduce this product. Plus, being right by the MCA Roofing Games helped draw the right people to our booth. In an area like Tampa, we were promoting the benefit of our products in solar installations. In fact we had a visitor from Sri Lanka who was interested in standing seam roofing and wanted to know about our clips.” The design of the Universal Composite Panel System (UCPS) 1000 Series incorporates a concealed drainage system and a concealed fastener design.

Kristin Peregoy, marketing manager, New Tech Machinery, Denver, says her company celebrated industry accomplishments this year and is looking forward to doing so next year. “To help mark METALCON’s 25th anniversary, New Tech Machinery and S-5! co-hosted a kick-off party that had a great turn out. Everyone involved in the show had a part in growing the industry in the last 25 years and by partnering together who knows how big it could get. New Tech Machinery has been attending METALCON for many years and it has consistently been our biggest show. Next year is also New Tech Machinery’s 25th anniversary so we’re making great plans for our celebration at METALCON.”

Before the exhibits opened on the first day, that distinctive rumble of a Harley-Davidson motorcycle started the keynote presentation as Clyde Fessler, former vice president of business development for Harley-Davidson Motor Co., rode a Harley into the ballroom, drawing a rousing applause from the audience.

As Fessler reflected on the history of Harley-Davidson and its turnaround, he captured the essence of how communication with customers played a major role, stating that “problems are in the office; solutions are in the field.” Other key points from his presentation were for companies to: be direct about any weaknesses; address the competition squarely; go global if possible; create accessories if that works for the product line; and to remember that marketing people bring the passion and that brings success.

METALCON’s success is based on three key methods of education: exhibits, an extensive education program and interactive, live demos. This year’s conference program included 90-minute classroom sessions focused on what CEOs, presidents and managers need to move their companies forward. Learning Zones offered education inside the exhibit hall in 15-minute sessions with presentations on technical applications and solutions. The live-action MCA Metal Roofing Championship Games held in the exhibit hall drew volunteers from the audience to compete in five different types of challenges involving various metal roofing applications and techniques.

This year METALCON committed its Giving Back Program to America’s Fund, a non-profit organization dedicated to helping U.S. Armed Forces’ veterans and their families. This affiliation allows METALCON to focus its giving back efforts throughout the year on assisting members of the military in all branches of the U.S. Armed Forces. Contributions to America’s Fund can be made any time on the METALCON website. Each year a special fund raising drive will be held at METALCON to help a specific America’s Fund program serving veterans in the show’s location that year.

During this year’s 25th anniversary celebration, show management honored companies that helped pioneer METALCON and have remained exhibitors. METALCON Show Director Claire Kilcoyne also received an award, the first annual MCA Triumph Award. These awards honor individuals and companies in the metal construction industry in nine different categories. Claire received the 2015 Industry Champion of the Year Award for spearheading the METALCON show for 25 successful years.

Other categories in the MCA’s annual Triumph Award are: Young Movers and Shakers; Media Executive/Journalist; Sales Person; Entrepreneur; Business of the Year – Contractor, Manufacturer, and Service Provider; Emerging Business; Corporate Citizen – Business and Individual; and Marketer – Business to Business and Consumer.

The next METALCON takes place at the Baltimore Convention Center in Baltimore from Oct. 26-28, 2016.

METALCON draws designers, builders, developers, contractors, fabricators and suppliers from more than 50 countries each year. Industry experts from nearly 300 companies exhibit the latest products and technology, while sharing their knowledge with attendees. Industry specialists present key topics in the show’s highly-rated education program.

METALCON is produced by PSMJ Resources Inc. and sponsored by the Metal Construction Association.

Metl-Span Appoints New President

Metl-Span announced that Steven R. Zirkel has joined the company as the new president. Metl-Span provides insulated metal panel products for increasing usage in institutional, commercial, industrial and cold-storage markets.

“I’m looking forward to building on a heritage of customer focus and innovation to serve our customers and grow the demand of insulated metal panels,” Zirkel says.

Zirkel comes to Metl-Span with more than 20 years of global leadership experience. Prior to joining Metl-Span, Zirkel was vice president of marketing, sales and commercial excellence at William Scotsman, leading strong customer focus and growth. Prior to that, Zirkel worked at Owens Corning as the director of market and business development, where he led strategy and growth plans for the rigid extruded polystyrene foam insulation business unit. Additionally, while at Owens Corning he was general manager of the global thermoplastics business and managing director of Asia Pacific. He has lived and worked on three continents and conducted business in more than 30 countries.