Petersen adds Technical Representatives in Canada for Metal Roof, Wall Systems

Petersen is expanding its network of manufacturer representatives into Canada to meet the country’s growing demand for metal roof and wall cladding systems. The manufacturer representatives from Enercorp will support architects, consultants, installing contractors and others involved in the specification and installation of exterior metal cladding products from coast-to-coast across Canada.

Enercorp (enercorp.ca) will represent Petersen’s PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in Alberta, British Columbia, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec. The firm also represents products made by Carlisle Construction Materials, which owns Petersen. PAC-CLAD products will be shipped from its Elk Grove Village, Ill., facility.

“Partnering with Enercorp to represent Petersen is a significant step toward successfully servicing Canadian design and construction professionals who are looking for metal roof and wall products. The sales team at Enercorp will satisfy the architectural metal needs of Petersen’s existing and new customers in Canada as we grow the PAC-CLAD brand,” said Mike Petersen, president.

Petersen’s metal cladding products are used in Canada for a wide variety of projects, including commercial, educational, healthcare, residential and most other buildings to deliver a clean and elegant aesthetic. Petersen’s PAC-CLAD products include a high percentage of recycled material, which lowers their environmental footprint and supports sustainability, while being equally applicable for both new construction and restoration of existing building envelopes.

“One of Enercorp’s strengths is consulting architects on product specification, and Petersen is a spec-driven manufacturer, so this is a strongly aligned partnership,” said Dan Meskell, architectural representative at Enercorp. “Adding the PAC-CLAD product line to the Enercorp mix is a natural growth opportunity. We look forward to giving Canadian architects and construction professionals additional options for their exterior cladding needs with quality PAC-CLAD products.”

For more information, visit www.pac-clad.com.

Petersen Adds Rep to Meet Demand for Metal Cladding in Hawaii, Guam

Petersen continues to meet the growing demand for its PAC-CLAD metal roof and wall products in the Western United States by hiring representation to service U.S. islands in the Pacific Ocean. The firm BEST Hawaii (Building Enclosure Specialist Team Hawaii) will support architects, installing contractors and others involved in the specification and installation of exterior metal cladding products on all Hawaiian islands and Guam.

Grant Henry from BEST Hawaii, based in Honolulu and Maui, will represent Petersen’s PAC-CLAD products. Grant Henry can be contacted by calling 808 870-4922, by sending email to ghenry@best-hawaii.com or by visiting best-hawaii.com.

“Petersen is growing to meet demand for its products west of the continental United States by hiring BEST Hawaii to serve our customers. We look forward to satisfying the architectural metal needs of Petersen’s many existing and new customers on those islands,” said David Hedrick, regional manager of Petersen’s Phoenix location.


Petersen, a Carlisle company, manufactures PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. PAC-CLAD products include standing seam roof panels, hidden- and exposed-fastener wall panels, flush- and reveal-joint panels, vented or solid soffit panels, perforated metal, coil and flat sheet, composite panels, column covers, plus fascia and coping. All are available in Kynar 70% PVDF finish in 45 standard colors that include a 30-year finish warranty. Most colors meet LEED and Energy Star requirements, and are rated by the Cool Roof Rating Council. Custom colors and weathertightness warranties are offered. Founded in 1965, Petersen’s facilities are located in Illinois, Georgia, Texas, Maryland, Arizona and Minnesota. 

For more information, visit pac-clad.com.

New Steel and Aluminum Standing Seam Roof Panel Offers Bi-Directional Installation

Petersen expands its line of PAC-CLAD standing seam roof products with the addition of the T-250 panel. Combining structural performance with architectural aesthetics, architects will enjoy the bolder profile of the T-250, installing contractors will appreciate the bi-directional installation capabilities and building owners will benefit from the panel’s impressive strength.

The strongest of all PAC-CLAD roof products, the T-250 panel is available in 16- and 18-inch widths in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. T-250 features a nominal 2.65-inch seam height above the roof deck. It is available in all 45 standard PAC-CLAD colors, each of which carries a 30-year non-prorated finish warranty. A weathertightness warranty also is available.

“Our T-250 panel satisfies the needs of architects designing structures that include expansive roof areas requiring long panel runs” said Mike Petersen, president. “Plus, architects might also prefer the wider seam of the T-250 panel, which creates bold shadow lines. The T-250 panel follows Petersen’s drive to continue adding products that expand the creative palette of building designers.”

Standard panel condition for the T-250 is with striations, but smooth is an option. The T-250 is available in 24 and 22 gauge steel, and .032 and .040 gauge aluminum. The T-250 can be specified with a traditional intermittent fastening clip, or a continuous clip fastening system for high-performance open-framing scenarios where extra strength is required. Both clips allow for thermal expansion and contraction. Job-specific design calculations should be performed to determine the type of clip required.

The panel is bi-directional, which allows installers to position the first panel in the center of a roof and install simultaneously in both directions, making it easy to achieve an attractive symmetrical look, while allowing multiple crews to work at the same time.

Named for the shape created where two panels meet, the T-250 is a symmetrical panel whose seams form the letter T. A metal cap is placed over the T and a mechanical seamer bends each side of the cap under the top of the T to form a strong bond. The T-250 panel is equipped with the following tests: ASTM 283, 331, 1680, 1646, E1592 and E2140, plus FM 4474 as well as UL 580 and 1897.

PAC T-250 panels can be factory- or field-formed to length but must be field-seamed. The panels have been designed for application over a wide variety of substrates on roof slopes as low as 1/2:12. Sealant beads are factory-applied to the seam cover. The seam cover is roll formed in the factory.

Substrates may include 5/8-inch minimum plywood, nailboard insulation or equal with WIP 300 underlayment applied horizontally from eave to ridge. Other substrates may include metal decking, purlins or rigid insulation in conjunction with bearing plates, and open framing.

Maximum factory-produced panel length for the T-250 is 54 feet, but longer lengths are available through field forming. Seam covers will be limited to 30-foot maximum lengths and must be field-lapped.

For more information, visit pac-clad.com.

South Carolina Resort’s Metal Roof Complements Classic Low Country Architecture

The new Inn at Palmetto Bluff was inspired by a mansion built on the property in the early 1900s. Photos: Nurnberg Photography, www.nurnbergphotography.com

The recently expanded Palmetto Bluff Resort in Bluffton, South Carolina, now boasts a new 74-room inn designed by Dallas-based HKS Architects. The new Inn at Palmetto Bluff sits alongside an expanded lagoon waterway and was inspired by the R.T. Wilson Jr. mansion built on the property in the early 1900s. Located in the Low Country between Charleston and Savannah, Palmetto Bluff is one of the largest waterfront properties on the East Coast. The resort is set within the 20,000-acre Palmetto Bluff community and conservation preserve that features an array of Southern-style residential neighborhoods ranging from multi-million-dollar legacy family compounds to more traditionally sized single-family homes.

The inn is finished with artisan James Hardie siding on the exterior façade, and a Petersen standing seam metal roof was chosen to complement the classic Low Country architecture. The roof features PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels finished in custom color Patrician Bronze. Approximately 75,000 square feet of the 24-gauge Galvalume panels were installed on a tight deadline.

Don Harrier, principal at HKS, said one of the greatest challenges was complying with a long list of restrictions designed to keep additions within the scope of the original buildings, such as a mandated three-story height limit and rules regarding waterways.

The inn is topped with a standing seam metal roof featuring Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels. Photos: Nurnberg Photography, www.nurnbergphotography.com

“It’s easy to get into a site like this for construction, but in our world we have staging areas for materials, contractor trailers, etc., and because of the environment, we had to build another building first to house back-of-the-house areas, maintenance, administration and parking,” Harrier says. “There were a lot of logistics involved as far as taking care of the site.”

Installation of the Snap-Clad panels on the 154,000-square-foot luxury inn was done by Southern Roof & Wood Care in Hardeeville, South Carolina. “It was a complicated job with three adjoining sections of the roof and lots of different elevations and planes and dormers. The flashing details were complex,” says David Swanson, president of SRWC.

Southern Roof & Wood Care has considerable experience with Petersen’s PAC-CLAD profiles. “We like Snap-Clad because it doesn’t require mechanical seaming. We use it whenever we can and when it meets the wind uplift requirements,” Swanson notes. “Of course, we also install a lot of Tite-Loc and Tite-Loc Plus, too. We like using the PAC-CLAD products and we can be competitive in the marketplace. We’re really happy with the Petersen relationship. They stand behind their products.”

The Snap-Clad panels were manufactured at Petersen’s plant in Acworth, Georgia. The general contractor was Choate Construction in Savannah, Georgia. The Petersen distributor was Commercial Roofing Specialties in Savannah, Georgia.

TEAM

Architect: HKS Architects, Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

General Contractor: Choate Construction, Savannah, www.choateco.com

Roofing Contractor: Southern Roof & Wood Care, Hardeeville, South Carolina, www.southernroof.com

Distributor: Commercial Roofing Specialties, Savannah, Georgia, www.crssupply.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Patrician Bronze, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Sealer Designed for Metal Roof Applications

Drop-Stop sealer was specifically designed for application to metal roofs and problem areas such as gutters, expansion joints, etc. Drop-Stop can easily be applied over sloped, contoured surfaces and will give long lasting, colorful protection, according to the company. Made from select synthetic rubbers, Drop-Stop is applied effortlessly as heavy bodied paints. This unique material actually stretches and recovers to bridge roof joints in which thermal movement can be expected. With 1500 PSI tensile strength and 600 percent elongation capabilities, Drop-Stop can single handedly tackle most metal repairs. White Drop-Stop is stocked in: 20 oz. sausage packs, 1 gallon pails, 5-gallon buckets and 55-gallon drums.

For more information, visit www.dynamicfastener.com.

Metal Roof and Wall Panels Add Sleek, Modern Look to New Medical Complex

The CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances Herrington-Ornelas HealthPark in Tyler, Texas, houses an urgent care clinic, medical offices, a physical therapy area and a fitness center. Photos Petersen.

When Brice Harris of Harris Craig Architects began designing a new health complex in Tyler, Texas, he knew his client wanted to maintain continuity with the company’s other medical facilities but at the same time update the look. The roof and wall panel systems became the key to meeting both design goals.

The standing seam metal roof and metal wall panel systems are now the signature architectural features of the CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances Herrington-Ornelas HealthPark. The new construction project encompasses some 43,000 square feet of space housing an urgent care clinic, medical offices, a physical therapy area and a fitness center.

The Design

Harris Craig primarily focuses on institutional projects, including schools. About a quarter of the firm’s work involves health care facilities. On this project, a merger while it was underway added a few wrinkles in the design process.

Crews from Tyler Roofing installed the metal wall panels, which included PAC-CLAD HWP panels and PAC-CLAD flush panels from Petersen, as well as Longboard Siding in Dark Cherry Wood Grain from Mayne Coatings Corp. Photos Petersen.

“The hospital system is CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances,” Harris notes. “When we began work on the project, it was for Trinity Mother Frances, and they partnered up with another hospital network, so part of the challenge on this job was switching the branding in the middle of the project. Luckily our overall design fit very well. The branding changes were more prominent on the inside of the building and didn’t have much effect on the exterior design.”

The property is strategically located at the intersection of two busy roads, and the highly visible site posed some concerns. “We really didn’t have a back of the building,” Harris explains. “The challenge of the design really was to efficiently present this building well both to the street and to the people who would be approaching it from the opposite side. That actually drove a lot of how the building form turned out, along with our desire to both help modernize the look of the clinic a little bit and to tie it back to some of the existing branding.”

The roof was designed to echo the other structures but uses different materials. “They share the prominent use of the gable on the building, but here we brought it forward into a contemporary design aesthetic,” Harris says.

For this project the design team specified a standing seam metal roof manufactured by Petersen that encompasses approximately 6,000 square feet. Low-slope roof sections over each wing were covered with 60-mil TPO roof system manufactured by GAF.

Wall panels were used to extend the sleek, modern look down to the ground, in contrast to the many brick buildings in the area. “We wanted to lighten up the look a little bit and bring in some new materials as part of the modernization,” Harris says. “We have composite panels, horizontal panels, and wood-look aluminum panels.”

Key concerns included making sure the various systems tied together perfectly. “The transition between the wall and roof is a very important detail for us,” Harris notes. “The most complicated areas for us on this project would be at the front of the building with the big glass windows and composite panels, and areas where the composite panel ties into the TPO roof and the metal panels. That was probably the trickiest part of the design.”

The Installation

Tyler Roofing was a natural fit for the project due to its established relationships with the architect and general contractor, WRL General Contractors, headquartered in Flint, Texas. “We do a lot of work in Tyler, and we’ve worked on a lot of Harris Craig projects,” says Tommy Ray Sukiennik, a 24-year veteran at the company, which was founded by his father and uncle 35 years ago. “We’re one of the competitive contractors in our area.”

Herrington-Ornelas HealthPark is located at a busy intersection and is visible from all sides, so the building was designed to present itself well to every vantage point. Photos Petersen.

The company’s share of metal roof and wall panel work is increasing, notes Sukiennik. “We’ve been doing standing seam roofs for more than 20 years. Lately we’ve been doing a lot of wall panels — Petersen HWP wall panels, flush mounts, things like that. As far as metal goes, we try to be diverse enough that we can install any system that comes out on the plans.”

Tyler Roofing installed the roof systems and wall panels on the project, along with gutters, soffits and trim. Work began with the fully adhered GAF EverGuard TPO roof system, which was installed over the metal deck, 4 inches of polyisocyanurate insulation and a half-inch cover board. The low-slope roofs over the wings house the HVAC units, but details involved were straightforward, notes Sukiennik. “It was all pretty basic,” he says. “At some points we had to tie in the TPO roof, the metal on the parapet wall, and the metal on the exterior wall all together.”

To dry in the gable roof, crews installed 4 inches of polyiso insulation and a self-adhering waterproofing underlayment. They also installed custom-fabricated gutters. “We built a gutter that hangs off the edge of the eave that a starter clip goes on top of, so it’s integrated into the roof,” Sukiennik notes.

The 18-inch-wide, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad roof panels in Champagne Metallic were delivered to the site. “We order all of the panels to length from Petersen,” Sukiennik says. “One of the plants is here in Tyler, and actually not far from the job, so it was very convenient. All of the rest of the trim, parapets, wall flashings and components we fabricated ourselves in the shop with metal they supplied.”

The roof panels were raised to the roof using a SkyTrak lift with specially built cradles. The wide-open jobsite and the flat roofs on either side of the gable made the roof area easily accessible. “It was just a straight run gable roof. There are no penetrations in the standing seam,” Sukiennik says. “The panels are easy to install. The Snap-Clad panels just pop together.”

The standing seam metal roof and metal wall panels were used to give the complex a modern look, while the prominent gable roof echoes the hospital system’s other facilities. Photos Petersen.

Tyler Roofing crews also installed the metal wall panels, which included 16-inch-wide, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD HWP panels in Dark Bronze from Petersen; 12-inch-wide, .032-inch aluminum PAC-CLAD flush panels from Petersen; and 6-inch-wide extruded Longboard Siding in Dark Cherry Wood Grain from Mayne Coatings Corp.

Wall panels were installed using scissor lifts and ladders. “We kept running a laser to make sure everything was horizontal and lined up,” says Sukiennik. “Then we finished it off with the trim and the cap. We tied everything into the expansion joints and trimmed it out so it was as clean as could be.”

The workload on this project was greater than usual, so skillfully managing the crews was important. “Usually we roof a building, and then we have to wait on the other contractors to do the brick and stucco on the exterior, and then we have to come back and trim it out and finish,” Sukiennik explains. “On this project, we did probably 70 percent of the exterior of the building, so we were working on the building continuously while we were doing other projects.”

The good news was that the crews had most of the work under their own control. “There were no issues of expecting someone else to make sure things were done the way we wanted them done. We tied everything in ourselves.”

Work was completed in the summer, so the heat was an issue. “When we put the wall panels on during July and August, it was pretty hot, so we had to work on one side of the building in the morning and then switch sides in the afternoon,” Sukiennik says, noting that his company is used to coping with extreme conditions. “In East Texas, we can have every type of weather there is within three days almost.”

Team Effort

Sukiennik credits WRL General Contractors for the well-coordinated jobsite. “We work on a lot of projects with the same contractors, so we all watch out for each other,” he says. “We do a good job of staying on top of things. We do a lot of work here, and this our family town, so we take pride in our work. We do the best we can.”

On the gable roof, Tyler Roofing installed 18-inch-wide, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad roof panels cut to length by Petersen. Tyler Roofing also fabricated and installed trim, parapet metal, wall flashings and gutters. Photos Petersen.

Comprehensive details and pre-production meetings ensured the installation was uneventful, according to Sukiennik. “The architect does a good job of making sure everything blends,” he says. “We usually don’t have issues with details and things like that. They try to make it as smooth as could be.”

During construction, members of the design and installation teams stayed in touch to make sure everything went according to plan. “This project was only about a mile from our office, so it was convenient to stop by, and it was a project we were really excited about,” Harris recalls. “We meet frequently with our installers to discuss details. We like to learn what works and what doesn’t work from the crews in the field. We want to listen to the wisdom of the guys who are out there actually doing the work.”

It’s all part of making sure the building owner is satisfied. “What we were excited about for this project was the opportunity to define a new look for CHRISTUS Trinity Mother Frances to help them match the quality of their facilities with the quality of care in Tyler and the region,” Harris says. “We see one of our strengths as building long-term relationships with our clients to give us the opportunity and trust to do that.”

TEAM

Architect: Harris Craig Architects Inc., Tyler, Texas, www.hcarch.com
General Contractor: WRL General Contractors, Flint, Texas, www.wrl-gc.com
Roofing Contractor: Tyler Roofing Company Inc., Tyler, Texas, www.tylerroofingco.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: 24-gauge, 18-inch PAC CLAD Snap-Clad Panels in Champagne Metallic, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com
TPO Roof Membrane: 60-mil EverGuard TPO, GAF, www.GAF.com
Metal Wall Panels: 24-gauge, 16-inch PAC-CLAD HWP panels in Dark Bronze, Petersen
Flush Panels: .032-inch, 12-inch Aluminum PAC-CLAD Flush Panels, Petersen
Wood Accent Panels: 6-inch Longboard Siding in Dark Cherry Wood Grain, Mayne Coatings Corp., www.longboardfacades.com

Standing Seam Metal Roof Is the Natural Choice for New Cottage in Wisconsin

A standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels was the natural choice to clad the roof of This new construction project in the North Woods of Wisconsin features a standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels. Photos: RHEINZINK

A standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels was the natural choice to clad the roof of a new cottage located in the North Woods of Wisconsin. Approximately 2,500 square feet of RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels met the owner’s criteria. “The multi-level roof was a key part of the design and we wanted it to blend into the environment as much as possible,” the owner says. “You won’t find another material that looks as natural and exquisite as RHEINZINK.”

The prePATINA blue-grey panels were fabricated by RHEINZINK systems partner Sheet Metal Supply (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois. The installation team was led by Lou Rondeau of Natural Metal Associates, Mont Vernon, New Hampshire. Rondeau is an experienced zinc craftsman and instructor in fabrication techniques. He was assisted by Craig Hardin of Hardin Construction, Union Bridge, Maryland, and Chad Wolbert of W&W Construction, Williamsport, Maryland. The three men were on the job for five days. The general contractor on the project was Rod Flohr Construction, LLC, Tomahawk, Wisconsin.

“Rondeau did a fantastic job on the installation, including some beautiful detailing,” the owner says. He specifically mentioned the crescent seams at the eaves. “It’s a designer detail,” according to Rondeau. “Most guys will do a straight up and down 90-

Approximately 2,500 square feet of RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels were used to construct the roof. Photos: RHEINZINK

degree edge. But we like to spend a little extra time on the detailing and seaming. RHEINZINK can last a lifetime so it’s important to make the appearance as classic and timeless as possible. I really like working with the qualities and craftsmanship associated with it.”

Overall, the job was relatively straightforward, according to Rondeau. “The greatest challenge was getting to the site in the North Woods,” he says. “But the cottage turned out to be a real gem in that wilderness environment.”

TEAM

Metal Fabricator: Sheet Metal Supply (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois, www.sheetmetalsupplyltd.com
Roofing Contractors: Natural Metal Associates, Mont Vernon, New Hampshire,
www.facebook.com/Natural-Metals-Associates-228362561021655/
Hardin Construction, Union Bridge, Maryland, hardinconstructionllc.com
W&W Construction, Williamsport, Maryland,
www.facebook.com/WW-Construction-LLC-430340303795069/

MATERIALS

Metal Panels: RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels in prePATINA blue-grey, RHEINZINK, www.rheinzink.us

Standing Seam Metal Roof Crowns Jaindl Farms Office Addition

The Jaindl Farms office complex sits on an a 12,000-acre turkey farm complete with its own feed mill. Photo: Steve Wolfe Photography.

Jaindl Farms is a multigenerational family business that encompasses a land development company and a fully integrated turkey farm. Its headquarters sits on 12,000 acres of farmland in Orefield, Pennsylvania, where the company grows the crops to make the feed for its turkeys. When the owners contacted MKSD Architects in Allentown, Pennsylvania, about adding space to their offices, the goals were to provide room to expand and to honor the Jaindl family’s history and legacy.

“The owner has a deep appreciation for all things agrarian and for old barns,” recalls Todd Chambers, partner, MKSD Architects. “One day we were meeting about the project, and he said, ‘What do you think about reusing the timber frame of an old barn?’ A light bulb went off.”

A large barn in Northampton County was located and dismantled, and the frame was repurposed for the office addition. The new two-story stone structure connects to the existing one-story office building, which was roofed with natural cedar shakes. A standing seam metal roof was specified for the new structure in

The new two-story addition was constructed with wood repurposed from a barn built around 1900. It was topped with a new standing seam metal roof. Photo: Steve Wolfe Photography.

keeping with the traditional architecture of the area. “We were concerned about the aesthetics, so standing seam was an obvious choice,” Chambers says. “We tried to keep the penetrations to a minimum and keep them out of the view of the main facade.”

The roofing contractor on the project was The Gehringer Company, headquartered in Whitehall, Pennsylvania. The company was called in to handle the project by the general contractor, Allentown-based Bracy Contracting Inc. The Gehringer Company’s president, Tom Gehringer, recommended a Dutch Seam roof system manufactured by ATAS International because it had the durability and aesthetics the project required, but was also easy to install. “It’s less labor-intensive than other systems because it doesn’t require a mechanical seamer,” he notes.

A Turkey Shoot

The roofing installation went very smoothly, according to Gehringer and Chambers. The Gehringer Company crews installed 6,400 square feet of ATAS MRD-110 Dutch Seam panels on the roof. They also installed approximately 500 square feet of metal panels as siding on the dormers. “It’s a 12-inch-wide piece with a raised section at the lock,” notes Gehringer. “When it’s installed looks like board and batten siding.”

The roof features dormers to bring in natural light. The dormers are sided with metal panels to minimize roof maintenance. Photo: The Gehringer Corporation.

Installation began in January 2017, so the weather posed the biggest challenge. “We did it when the temperatures were pretty low. The highs were in the 20s,” Gehringer recalls. “The nice thing is you can install the system in almost any temperature.”

After ATA-Shield high temperature synthetic underlayment was applied to the entire surface of the plywood deck, the roof panels were installed. “We worked from our aerial lifts,” Gehringer explains. “We purchased two aerial lifts several years ago and now use them for almost all of our steep roofing installations.”

Details included SL-2 Snow Meister snow guards from Berger Brothers. “In this climate, one of the tricky pieces with standing seam is sliding snow, so we specified snow guards that clamp to the standing seams,” Chambers says. “The ones we used emulate the turkey tail feathers.”

Roofing crews also tied in a small section of new cedar shakes to extend the hallway of the existing structure and connect it to the new addition. “We installed the original cedar shakes on the adjacent section for Bracy Contracting almost 20 years ago,” notes Gehringer.

The project went off without a hitch. Gehringer credits his company’s experienced crews and field supervisors for its

The snow guards installed on the project were chosen in part because they reminded the business owners of a turkey’s tail feathers. Photo: The Gehringer Corporation.

excellent track record. “I believe we’re one of the larger architectural metal roofing installers in our area and have virtually no callbacks on roofs we install,” he says. “What it boils down to is having people that know how to do it right — and having people that are committed to doing it right. And with architectural metal work, you have to take your time and do it right. This metal roof is going to look exactly like it looks now for at least 30 years.”

Looking back, what strikes Chambers is how different this project was from his typical assignments. “We’re commercial architects. We do a lot of health care work,” he says. “The ability to design something that’s not done every day, and is different than your typical approach, is refreshing and fun.”

TEAM

Architect: MKSD Architects, Allentown, Pennsylvania, www.MKSDarchitects.com
General Contractor: Bracy Construction Inc., Allentown, Pennsylvania, www.BracyConstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: The Gehringer Corporation, Whitehall, Pennsylvania, www.GehringerRoofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof Panels: ATAS Dutch Seam MRD110, .032 aluminum, Medium Bronze, ATAS International Inc., www.ATAS.com
Metal Siding Panels: ATAS Multi-Purpose Panels MPW120, .032 aluminum, Sierra Tan, ATAS International Inc.
Synthetic Underlayment: ATA-Shield, ATAS International Inc.
Snow Guards: SL-2 Snow Meister Snow Guards, Berger Building Products, www.bergerbp.com

S-5! Releases Updated Attachment Solutions & Products Brochure

S-5! has published its 2018 Attachment Solutions & Products brochure and made it available for download.

The 20-page brochure can be found at: https://www.s-5.com/resources/download-library/, with all other S-5! literature.

The Attachment Solutions & Products brochure contains information about what S-5! attachment products can be used for and how to correctly use them. The S-5! line of aluminum and brass attachment products are extremely versatile, fitting most standing seam and exposed fastener metal roof profiles, including most structural and architectural profiles.

In the brochure, find solutions for attaching solar panels, snow retention systems, signs, banners, pipes and conduits, HVAC and rooftop equipment, satellite dishes, lightning protection, fall protection and more.

For more information, visit www.s-5.com.

Metal Roof and Wall Panels Capture the Spirit of Shakespearean Theater

The Otto M. Budig Theater is the home of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. The new theater was designed by GBBN Architects in Cincinnati. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp

For many new arenas and theaters, the sheer size and scope of the project can pose the biggest hurdles. At the new Otto M. Budig Theater, home of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, the problem was the reverse. The intimate theater was shoehorned into an existing space up against an adjacent building, so logistics were tight. But that didn’t mean the roof system couldn’t be striking. Designed by GBBN Architects in Cincinnati, the building’s exterior features daring angles and multi-colored metal roof and wall panels that combine to help capture the spirit of the Shakespearean theater.

Matt Gennett, senior project manager and vice president of Tecta America Zero Company in Cincinnati, oversaw the roofing portion of the new construction project in the Over the Rhine section of Cincinnati on the corner of Elm Street and 12th Street. “This building was plugged in downtown, and they fit everything in real tight,” he says.

Approximately 5,400 square feet of PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch, 24-gauge Corrugated Panels from Petersen Aluminum Corp. were installed on the metal roofs and walls. Tecta America Zero Company installed the metal roof systems, as well as a TPO roof manufactured by Carlisle SynTec over the main structure and mechanical well. Work began in January of 2017 and the roofing portion of the project was wrapped up in late August.

The Metal Roof System

The building features two different metal roof systems. The roof on the Elm Street side is comprised of three intersecting triangle-shaped sections in two colors, Champagne Metallic and Custom Metallic Bronze. “There were several unique angles on the roof,” Gennett explains. “On the top, there was a second metal roof, a shed roof that went down to the 12th Street side.”

The theater’s roof and walls feature approximately 5,400 square feet of PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels from Petersen Aluminum Corp. in two colors. The wall panels are perforated. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The metal roof systems were installed over a 2-inch layer of polyisocyanurate insulation and a 2-1/2-inch nail base from Hunter Panels, H-Shield NB. The nail base is a composite panel with a closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam core, a fiber-reinforced facer on one side and, in this case, 7⁄16-inch oriented strand board (OSB) on the other. The nail base was topped with Carlisle WIP 300 HT waterproofing underlayment to dry in the roof.

Crews also installed two rows of snow guards on the metal roof using the S-5! CorruBracket. “The snow guard was a little different,” Gennett says. “It was specifically designed for a corrugated roof.”

The TPO Roof System

The main roof and mechanical well were covered with the TPO roof system, which totaled approximately 8,300 square feet. After Carlisle VapAir Seal725 TR self-adhering air and vapor barrier was applied to the metal deck, crews installed two layers of 2-inch iso. Tapered insulation was applied over the top to ensure proper drainage. The insulation was covered with a 1/2-inch sheetrock and the 60-mil TPO was fully adhered.

Two large smoke hatches manufactured by Bilco were installed over the stage area. The ACDSH smoke hatches measured 66 inches by 144 inches, and are designed for theaters, concert halls and other interior applications that require limiting noise intrusion.

The Installation

The initial focus was to get the roof dried in so work could progress inside the building. The jobsite conditions posed a few challenges. The structure abutted an existing building, and the space was tight. The schedule necessitated multiple trips to the site, which can be a budget-buster on a small project. “We had a lot of trips in and out to accommodate the schedule and get everything dried in so they could meet the interior schedule,” notes Gennett. “We were sort of on call. We made three or four trips out to roof this small project, so it took a lot of coordination because it was completed in pieces.”

Crews tackled the TPO roof sections first. The mechanical well section provided several challenges. Changes in the mechanical well layout necessitated moving some curbs and making adjustments to the tapered insulation. “They were trying to get lot of equipment into a small space,” Gennett explains. “We had to make sure we could get the water to the low spots and route it around all of that equipment. That was probably the biggest challenge on the project.”

Staging material was also problematic, as traffic was heavy and parking space was at a premium. Material was loaded by a crane, which had to be set up in the street. “It’s a postage stamp of a site,” says Gennett. “This is a main thoroughfare, and there is a school right across the street. We had to work around school hours, and we couldn’t be working when the busses were coming in. We usually came in after school started, around 8 a.m., to load materials.”

When it came time to load the metal panels, the cramped jobsite actually paid off. “It was very convenient,” Gennett recalls. “We were able to load the panels onto the adjacent roof and just hand them over. We had a nice staging area for cutting, so all in all it wasn’t bad.”

The corrugated panels were installed with matching edge metal. “It’s not a complicated panel to install, and they look really nice,” Gennett notes. “On the Elm Street side, to the right of the valley was one color, and to the left was another, so we had to match the color with our coping. There were some interesting transitions with our metal. We also had to really pay attention to how the siding was being installed so we could match the metal to the siding and follow the transitions from color to color.”

The perforated wall panels were installed by ProCLAD Inc. of Noblesville, Indiana. “Once the walls were done, we came in and did the transition metal,” Gennett says. “We just had to make sure everything lined up perfectly.”

Planning Ahead

Ensuring a safe jobsite was the top priority for Tecta America Zero and Messer Construction, the general contractor on the project. “Both Messer Construction and Tecta America take safety very seriously. That’s why we’re good partners,” Gennett says. “We had PPE, high-visibility clothing, hard hats, safety glasses for the whole project. All of the guys were required to have their OSHA 10. Anyone outside of the safety barriers had to be tied off 100 percent of the time.”

Planning ahead was the key to establishing the safety plan and meeting the schedule while ensuring a top-quality installation. “This job had a lot of in and out, which is tough in the roofing business,” Gennett says. “But we planned ahead, we made sure everything was ready for us when we mobilized, and we did a good job of coordinating with the other trades. It took a lot of meetings and discussions — just good project management.”

Gennett credits the successful installation to a great team effort between everyone involved, including the general contractor, the subcontractors, and the manufacturers. “We pride ourselves on our great, skilled crews and our great field project management,” he says. “Our superintendents are there every day checking the work and making sure the guys have everything they need. Messer Construction is great to work with, and obviously having the manufacturer involved the project and doing their inspections as well helps ensure the quality meets everyone’s standards and holds the warranty.”

The theater is now another exciting venue in the Over the Rhine neighborhood. “It is really cool spot,” Gennett says. “It’s an up-and-coming neighborhood that’s grown in leaps and bounds in the last seven years. There is a ton going on in Cincinnati. It’s just another part of the city that makes it really fun to go downtown.”

TEAM

Architect: GBBN Architects, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.gbbn.com
General Contractor: Messer Construction, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.messer.com
Roofing Contractor: Tecta America Zero Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.tectaamerica.com
Wall Panel Installer: ProCLAD Inc., Noblesville, Indiana, www.procladinc.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof:
Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels, Petersen Aluminum Corp., www.pac-clad.com
Wall Panels: PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels, Petersen Aluminum Corp.
Nail Base: H-Shield NB, Hunter Panels, www.HunterPanels.com
Snow Guards: CorruBracket, S-5!, www.S-5.com
Waterproofing Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300 HT, Carlisle SynTec, www.CarlisleSyntec.com

TPO Roof:
Membrane: 60-mil grey TPO, Carlisle SynTec
Waterproofing Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300 HT, Carlisle SynTec
Smoke Hatches: ACDSH Acoustical Smoke Hatch, The Bilco Co., www.Bilco.com