Liberty University Taps Experienced Team for Indoor Practice Facility

Liberty University

Photo: Leah Seavers. Copyright Liberty University

While he was a student in the 1970s at Liberty Baptist College in Lynchburg, Va., Craig McCarty took a job with a roofing company to help him pay his way through school. One of his business courses required students to set up a model business, so McCarty set up a fictional roofing company.

When a recession forced his boss to close down the company where he worked, McCarty turned his classroom project into reality. He got his contractor’s license and formed his own roofing business at the age of 20. More than 40 years later, he is installing roofs on the same campus he once took classes for a college now known as Liberty University.

McCarty is the president of McCarty Roofing, headquartered in Lynchburg, Va. This year the company installed the standing seam metal roof on Liberty University’s new indoor football practice facility, the fourth building the company has worked on at the school. McCarty has always been fascinated by metal roofs, and he estimates that 70 percent of the company’s business comes from the metal segment of the market. “It’s our passion, and we’re really good at it,” he says.

Liberty University’s new indoor practice facility encloses an entire regulation football field.

Liberty University’s new indoor practice facility encloses an entire regulation football field. The structural metal roof system is made of panels that run the entire width of the building.

He’s found a great place to ply his trade in Liberty University, which has made roofs manufactured by Fabral Metal Wall and Roof Systems into something of a signature architectural style. Other Fabral roofs at the university include those on Williams Stadium, Hancock Welcome Center, Jerry Falwell Library, and the LaHaye Recreation and Fitness Center.

According to Jerry Wandel, Fabral’s Mid-Atlantic territory manager, based in Richmond, Va., Fabral and distributor NB Handy in Lynchburg have partnered to provide architectural metal enclosure systems for 13 buildings on the campus since 2010.

The new practice facility encloses an entire regulation football field, and the design for the structural metal system on the vaulted barrel roof called for panels—many as long as 240 feet—that would run the entire width of the building.

Fabral’s Stand’N Seam 24-gauge panels in Dark Bronze were specified for the project. According to Wandel, the product features a unique stainless-steel clip design and double lock-seamed side joints that allow panels to expand and contract throughout their entire length. The system had been installed successfully on indoor practice facilities at other colleges, including Georgia Tech, the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech and Virginia Military Institute.

“When you run a panel that long, clearly one of the biggest concerns is expansion and contraction,” Wandel says. “Our Stand’N Seam product just lends itself to a project that has 240-foot panels. This one was right in our wheelhouse.”

Riding the Curve

The first task for McCarty Roofing was drying in the metal deck. Crews installed two layers of 2 ½ inch polysio and covered the insulation with Blueskin, a self-adhering underlayment manufactured by Henry.

The metal panels were fabricated on the site. Fabral supplied the roll former and brought in Ray Berryhill to operate the equipment. “Ray has done all of these jobs for us,” notes Wandel. “We want to make sure the contractor is in position to have a quality installation. Ray has so much knowledge about these jobs. He was the perfect person to execute this one.”

The panels were fabricated on the site.

The panels were fabricated on the site. The roll former was lifted into place at the edge of the roof by crane, and panels were rolled directly onto the roof and stacked for installation.

A crane was used to lift the roll former into place at the edge of the roof. “We were able to set the front two feet of the roll former in the built-in steel gutter, and then drop the back end of the machine down to the proper angle so we could roll the panels right onto the roof,” McCarty explains. “About every 15 or 20 feet up the roof we would stack some insulation, so the panel would float across the roof. Once it hit the top and went down the other side, it could just ride the roof down.”

The original plan was to install the panels as they came off the roll former, but McCarty decided it would be more efficient to run all of the panels, stack them on the roof, and install them once all of the panels were fabricated. “We had a large crane on site that was costing us money, and we had the people from Fabral there,” he recalls. “I went to the construction manager and said, ‘It’s going to make a lot more sense if we get all of the panels for the project up on the roof as quickly as possible.’”

The 4,000-pound metal coils typically supplied enough material for 8-10 panels, so Berryhill would run 8-10 panels at a time as crews from McCarty Roofing stacked them. When the roll former was lowered to the ground to load another coil, workers would strap the panels into place, figure out how much area the panels would cover, and set up again another 20 feet or so down the roof to receive the next batch. “We had a series of 15 or 20 straps for each bundle of panels,” says McCarty. “We had to be careful, but with eight people, you could pick up the panel and gently set it down.”

After the roll forming crew was done, the panels were pulled off of the stacks and installed. “It was a pretty extreme radius, but the panels just laid down on the roof perfectly,” McCarty recalls. “The design worked out really well.”

Liberty University

Photo: Joel Coleman. Copyright Liberty University

The built-in gutter gave crews a good location to set the bottom edge of the panels. “At the eaves, the roof pitch was very steep—maybe 12:12—and it was almost flat at the top,” notes McCarty. “We had to be tied off 100 percent of the time. We used retractables, but the safety equipment still limited our movement. It was pretty difficult for the guys working the first 30 or 40 feet.”

The roof featured large skylights, which made the metal panel layout critical. The design also featured upper and lower sections that stepped down around large windows, which made for some tricky details. “At the gable ends, we had to make the cuts at an angle,” McCarty notes. “We cut the panels in place with drill shears and hand turned them with tongs to lock then onto a cleat.”

The schedule was tight, and weather was also a concern. “It was in the dead of winter,” McCarty recalls. “We started laying panels in January. Fortunately, we had a mild winter, but at times it was like a wind tunnel. You’re not going to pick up a 240-foot panel in 35 mile-an-hour winds, so there were days we just weren’t able to work.”

The project was wrapped up at the end of May, and McCarty credits the decision to stack the panels as one of the keys to meeting the deadline. “It was the right call,” he says. “The time we saved made up for the lost days due to the weather and helped us complete the job on time.”

TEAM

Architect: VMDO Architects, Charlottesville, Va., VMDO.com
Construction Manager: CMA Inc., Lynchburg, Va., CMAinc.us
Roofing Contractor: McCarty Roofing Inc., Lynchburg, Va., McCartyroofing.net
Distributor: NB Handy Co., Lynchburg, Va., NBhandy.com
Metal Roof System Manufacturer: Fabral Metal Wall and Roof Systems, Fabral.com

Pre-Notched Trims and Flashing Components Save Time at the Jobsite

ATAS pre-notched trims and flashing are consistent dimensionally and provide an aesthetically pleasing final installation.

ATAS pre-notched trims and flashing are consistent dimensionally and provide an aesthetically pleasing final installation.

ATAS International Inc. has expanded its line of pre-notched trims and flashing components.  Trims and flashing are often critical elements of metal roof, wall and soffit installations.  They provide weather resistance of the installed system, as well as aesthetic value of the finished building.  ATAS can provide solutions that address both of those elements which can help to control costs.  
 
Common problems that occur in metal panel trim and flashing installation include maintaining the correct overlap distances.  As well, heavier gauges and multiple bends or complex shapes may make field notching difficult.  The quality of workmanship in creating trims and flashings in the field are not as easily controlled compared to factory fabrication, and the time to perform this operation in the field is typically longer.
 
ATAS trims and flashing are consistent dimensionally and provide an aesthetically pleasing final installation.  The use of these components eliminates unknown field costs and results in an efficient installation, which saves the contractor time and money. 

Silicone Sealant Repairs Roofs, Masonry and Sheet Metal

The 100 percent Silicone Sealant seals and repairs roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners.

The 100 percent Silicone Sealant seals and repairs roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners.

Mule-Hide Products Co. has added 100 percent Silicone Sealant choices to its Silicone Roof Coating System, expanding the color offering to include clear and the packaging options to include 10-ounce tubes.
 
100 percent Silicone Sealant is a mastic version of the Mule-Hide 100 percent Silicone Roof Coating. It is a moisture-cure silicone sealant designed for use in sealing and repairing roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners. 
 
The addition of clear sealant allows contractors to complete projects that would otherwise require color-matching. It is available packaged in tubes only.

In addition to clear, the tubes are available filled with white sealant. The plastic cartridges are an option for use in smaller applications or when precision is required. They also can be submerged under water to repair roof leaks, gutters and downspouts.
 
100 percent Silicone Sealant provides adhesion to concrete, masonry, polyurethane foam, EPDM membranes, TPO membranes, aged PVC membranes, aged acrylic coatings, granular cap sheets, wood, metals, Kynar finishes and most other building materials. When using 100 percent Silicone Sealant with a TPO roof membrane, Mule-Hide Si TPO Primer must be applied first. 
 
The sealant has minimal odor, making it contractor- and building-occupant-friendly. Its volatile organic compound (VOC) content of less than 10 grams per liter makes it acceptable for use in areas with VOC restrictions. It does not corrode metals.
 

Project Profiles: Hospitality & Entertainment

B.O.B., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Roof Materials

The double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

The double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

The B.O.B.’s 900-square-foot Sky Patio was completed in August 2015 when its signature green wall was installed. The distinctive double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

“Our living wall on the Sky Patio is a vivid symbol of our commitment to sustainability and support of the local environments where our restaurants are located,” says Alice Jasper, director of sustainability, the Gilmore Collection. “It greens up the exterior and interior of the rooftop patio, contributing to the beautification of downtown, making the patio more inviting from the street below and enhancing the dining experience of our guests.”

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet. Three exterior sections (48 inches in height) are attached to the outside of the fencing that surrounds the patio. Facing out to the street, these sections frame the Sky Patio on three sides with flowering annuals and perennials. There are five interior sections (45 1/2 inches in height), three on the inside of the perimeter fence, two on the back wall of the building. In addition to flowers, the interior sections include vegetables and herbs used in the kitchen.

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet.

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet.

“Local sourcing of ingredients is one of our main sustainable hospitality practices,” says Barbie Smith, the Gilmore Collection’s gardener. “With the green wall at the B.O.B., we grow ingredients right near the tables where our guests dine. You cannot get more local than that.”

“What chef wouldn’t want a garden with fresh herbs and produce right in their restaurant? A green wall makes it practical,” adds Mick Rickerd, chef at Bobarino’s. “We utilize the herbs in all our everyday dishes and the vegetables, like Swiss chard and rainbow carrots, in daily features. Our mixology team incorporates fresh basil, mint, lemongrass and thyme into special summer cocktails.”

Green Wall Manufacturer: LiveWall

Roof Report

The B.O.B. is the Gilmore Collection’s most ambitious project, and it exemplifies the company’s commitment to sustainability. The B.O.B. is an acronym for Big Old Building; the 70,000-square-foot, 4-story, red brick building was constructed in 1903 as a grocery warehouse. It stood vacant for decades before the Gilmore Collection saved it from demolition and began its transformation into a landmark hospitality destination in downtown Grand Rapids. The B.O.B. offers multiple venues, including bars, restaurants, comedy and nightclubs, as well as the rooftop Sky Patio, which is accessible through Bobarino’s restaurant on the second floor.

Photos: LiveWall

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MBMA Welcomes New Membership

The membership ranks of the Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA) are continuing to expand. MBMA recently welcomed Panasonic Corp. of North America (Panasonic) as its 60th Associate member, and Package Steel Systems Inc. as a Building Systems member.
 
Panasonic will be represented by Jon Downey, who serves as the company’s housing and construction market development manager. Package Steel Systems will be represented by Bob Fisette, who serves as the company’s president.
 
“Our members are vital to MBMA’s continued success and influence in the building and construction industry,” says Dan Walker, PE, associate general manager of MBMA. “Each company’s unique contributions help us to advance the acceptance of metal building systems as the building solution within the low-rise commercial construction market.”
 
Based in Newark, N.J., Panasonic Corporation of North America manufactures consumer and industrial products, including building insulation solutions and products for metal roofs and gutters. The company is a subsidiary of Osaka, Japan-based Panasonic Corp., founded in 1918.
 
Package Steel Systems is located in Sutton, Mass. The metal building manufacturer serves customers in the Northeastern region of the U.S.
 
The MBMA is comprised of metal building system manufacturers and their suppliers who fabricate or manufacture materials for the industry, as well as architecture and engineering firms and service providers.

Snow-retention System Avoids Roof-snow Avalanches

DualGard snow-retention system protects people and property from dangerous roof-snow avalanches.

DualGard snow-retention system protects people and property from dangerous roof-snow avalanches.

The DualGard snow-retention system from S-5! uses two 1-inch pipes to keep snow and ice in place while it melts safely. When installed properly, DualGard protects people and property from dangerous roof-snow avalanches. Designed to preserve the coveted look of the metal roof, DualGard can be painted, powder coated or anodized to match virtually any metal roof system. Mounted with S-5! mini clamps, the system comes with two sizes of snow clips for every roof type and can fit virtually any seam profile. DualGard has been fully tested and can be engineered for the specific roof and environment.

MFM Building Products’ Roofing Underlayment Is CSA Compliant

MFM Building Products has announced that the Ultra HT Wind & Water Seal high temperature roofing underlayment complies with CSA 123.22-08 “Self-Adhering Polymer Modified Bituminous Sheet Materials Used as Steep Roofing Underlayment for Ice Dam Protection.” The evaluation was completed by Canada Construction Materials Centre (CCMC) Evaluation Listing 14048-L.

This self-adhering roofing underlayment is composed of a white, non-slip, cross-laminated, high density polyethylene film laminated to a high temperature rubberized asphalt adhesive system. This product is durable, and offers a 90-day UV exposure rating.

Ultra HT is engineered as a whole roof underlayment for use under all roofing systems, including metal where high heat is generated. Product rolls out smooth and lays flat while offering the contractor foot traction. Ultra HT comes with a split release liner for use in valleys, ridges, around chimneys and at eaves for protection against ice dams, wind-driven rain and water penetration. Ultra HT adheres directly to the roof deck and self-seals around roofing fasteners. The product is rated to 121C maximum service range.

Ultra HT has a thickness of 45 mils and is available in a 91 centimeter by 20.4 meter roll. Ultra HT comes with a 10-year limited warranty.

For technical data, installation instructions or to request a free product sample, visit the company’s website.

Project Profiles: Education Facilities

Maury Hall, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Wagner Roofing, Hyattsville, Md.
General Contractor: C.E.R. Inc., Baltimore, (410) 247-9096

The project included 34 dormers that feature double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal.

The project included 34 dormers that feature double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal.

ROOF MATERIALS

Wagner Roofing was awarded the complete replacement of all roof systems. These included an upper double-lock standing-seam copper roof system, a bullnose copper cornice transition, slate mansard, 34 dormers with double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal, eight copper hip metal caps and a continuous built-in gutter with decorative copper fascia. Each of the dormers also had a copper window well.

The upper standing-seam roof was removed and replaced with 24-inch-wide, 20-ounce copper coil rollformed into 1-inch-high by 21-inch-wide continuous standing-seam panels that matched the original profile. The eave bullnose, which also served as the mansard flashing, was removed and returned to Wagner Roofing’s shop where it was replicated to match the exact size and profile.

The 34 dormer roofs were replaced with 20-inch-wide, 20-ounce copper coil formed into 1-inch-high by 17-inch- wide continuous standing-seam panels. The decorative ornate fascia of the dormers was carefully removed and Wagner’s skilled craftsmen used it as a template to develop the new two-piece copper cornice to which the roof panels locked. The cheeks and face of the dormers were also re-clad with custom-fabricated 20-ounce copper.

The oversized built-in-gutter at the base of the slate mansard was removed and replaced with a new 20-ounce copper liner custom-formed and soldered onsite. The replacement included a specialty “bull-nosed” drip edge at the base of the slate and an ornate, custom-formed fascia on the exterior of the built-in gutter. The decorative copper fascia included 85 “hubcaps”, 152 “half wheels” and 14 decorative pressed-copper miters. The original hubcap and half-wheel ornaments were broken down and patterns were replicated. Each ornamental piece was hand assembled from a pattern of 14 individual pieces of 20-ounce copper before being installed at their precise original location on the new fascia. The miters were made by six different molds, taken from the original worn pieces, to stamp the design into 20-ounce sheet copper.

In all, more than 43,000 pounds of 20-ounce copper was used on the project.

Copper Manufacturer: Revere Copper Products

ROOF REPORT

Maury Hall was built in 1907 and was designed by Ernest Flagg. Flagg designed many of the buildings at the U.S. Naval Academy, including the Chapel, Bancroft Hall, Mahan Hall, the superintendent’s residence and Sampson Hall. His career was largely influenced by his studies at École des Beaux-Arts, Paris. Examples of Flagg’s Beaux-Arts influence can be found in the decorative copper adorning the built-in gutter on building designs.

Maury Hall currently houses the departments of Weapons and Systems Engineering and Electrical Engineering. The building sits in a courtyard connected to Mahan Hall and across from its design twin, Sampson Hall.

PHOTO: Joe Guido

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McElroy Metal Releases Metal Roof and Wall Systems Product Catalog

McElroy Metal releases a 36 page product catalog.

McElroy Metal releases a 36 page product catalog.

McElroy Metal releases its 2016 product catalog, a 36-page roster covering the complete metal roof and wall systems line.

The catalog can be obtained from a McElroy Metal representative or on the company website.

The 2016 Product Catalog features McElroy Metal’s line of standing seam systems, soffit/fascia and canopy offerings, concealed fastener panels, exposed fastener panels, retrofit systems, solar solutions and insulated metal panels.

McElroy Metal Announces Website Relaunch

McElroy Metal, a metal roof and wall systems manufacturer serving the construction industry, announces its website relaunch at www.McElroyMetal.com.

McElroy Metal has dedicated sections of the new site to the specific markets it serves: residential, architectural/commercial, post frame, retrofit/recover, green building/solar and insulated metal panels. The site also contains animations highlighting installation sequences and a color visualizer enabling visitors to view their personal homes or businesses with McElroy Metal products and colors. The McElroy University portion of the site has been expanded to feature information on Hands-On Installation Classes, Substrate and Coating Facts, Finish and Substrate Warranty Education and Educational Videos.