Logistics Create Challenges on Metal Roof Installation for Kentucky High School

When the design for Logan High School in Russellville, Ky.

When the design for Logan High School in Russellville, Ky., called for metal panels measuring 161 feet, 2 inches in length, the decision was made to roll form them on the job site. Photos: Morin, a Kingspan Group Company

The design for the metal roof on Logan High School called for panels on one side of the roof to measure more than 160 feet. That posed logistical problems, to be sure, but the project proved there’s more than one way to deliver roof panels.

Morin, a Kingspan Group Company, recently introduced an onsite roll-forming process that runs panels to the eaves, where they are gathered and stacked for installation. Logan High School in Russellville, Ky., was the first project that put the method to the test. Panels on one side of the roof were 46 feet long, while panels on the other side measured 161 feet, 2 inches in length.

According to the company, the on-site process offers the benefit of producing panels of almost any length without lapping them. This is especially useful when restrictions on the length of delivery trucks and their loads do not allow for panels to be delivered via truck.

On this project, 89,000 square feet of SymmeTry Roof Series panels in Regal White were installed. “For the longer panels, we had 11 men on the roof,” says Basil Slagle, production manager and roll former operator for Morin. “We also had three separate scissor lifts between the roll former and the eave, with men on them to guide the panels to the roof because that’s as close as we could get with the roll former.”

The SymmeTry Roof Series is a mechanically seamed structural roof system that is both symmetrical and hydrostatic by design. Slagle produced 18-inch wide panels with 2 1/2-inch legs from the 22-gauge, pre-painted Galvalume.

The start of the project was delayed by heavy rains, notes Slagle. “And that Kentucky red clay, if you’d walk on it wet, you’d sink into the clay up to your shin. They had trucks with four-foot tires getting stuck in the wet clay.”

Tough Field Conditions

When the rain stopped, Slagle got to the jobsite on a Monday and realized he would not be able to drive his 10-ton vehicle into place. “They had to build us a 300-foot gravel road so we could pull the machine into place, get it where we needed it to be,” he says. “We finally got set up that Thursday morning.”

Eastern Corp. installed the roof system

Eastern Corp. installed the roof system, using crews ranging from 12-17 workers at a given time. Panels for the shorter side of the roof had to be transported over the ridge and stacked by hand. Photos: Morin, a Kingspan Group Company

Once the roll former was in place—about 100 feet from the roof eaves—the three scissor lifts were rolled into place in line between the roll former and the roof edge. Slagle then ran a “sacrifice panel” to use as a bridge, of sorts, from the roll former to the roof. Panels going on to the roof would slide across the sacrificial panel to the roof, where crew members would carry them to a staging spot on the roof. The sacrificial panel, almost 100 feet long, was eventually recycled.

Slagle ran the shorter panels first so crew members could haul them across the ridge to the opposite side of the building. Then the longer panels were produced and set up on the near side of the building. The Regal White panels were all covered with plastic film to protect them from the red clay on the boots of the installers, who had to walk on the panels to install the batten over the seams. After the battens were installed and seamed, the plastic film was removed. (Failure to remove the plastic film in a timely fashion will eventually lead to damage on the panels when the film is removed.)

“The installation went great,” says Nancy Mullins, senior project manager for Eastern Corp., of Norcross, Ga. “We had anywhere from 12-17 crew members at the site at a given time. The challenges were the logistical hurdles like getting the scissor lifts in place and getting the panels to the roof and stacking them.

On this project, 89,000 square feet of SymmeTry Roof

On this project, 89,000 square feet of SymmeTry Roof Series panels by Morin were installed. Photos: Morin, a Kingspan Group Company

“We install all the panels and then come back to install the seam cap and do the seaming. We always wait to make sure everything is where it needs to be, in regard to any penetrations. We really had no issues.”

After the panels were in place, the battens were installed and seamed around the 2 1/2-inch legs of each pan. The battens were cut to 46 feet to match the panel length for the shorter roof. To batten and seam the 161-plus foot panels, the battens were cut to 81 feet and lapped near the center. Slagle ran panels for four buildings at the school, one attached to the main school building and three outbuildings still under construction.

Eastern also installed 1,100 linear feet of a snow retention system, the iBeam from Sno Gem. The iBeam is installed near the eaves on both sides of the roof, with the longer panels hosting a second row nearer the center of the roof.

TEAM

Architect: JKS Architecture, Hopkinsville, Ky., JKSae.com
General Contractor: A&K Construction Inc., Paducah, Ky., AKconstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: Eastern Corp., Norcross, Ga., Easterncorpus.com
Metal Roof System Manufacturer: Morin, a Kingspan Group Company, Morincorp.com

Morin Names Schumacher to Serve Mid-Atlantic Region

Morin, A Kingspan Group Company, has hired Alec Schumacher as the Regional Sales Manager of the Mid-Atlantic Region. Based in Baltimore, Schumacher will be responsible for covering Washington D.C., Delaware, West Virginia, Maryland and Virginia.

Schumacher brings experience working with architectural firms in the region, representing commercial window and door manufacturers. He can be reached at alecs@morincorp.com.

Morin manufactures single-element metal wall and roof panel systems in its production facilities in Bristol, Conn.; Deland, Fla.; and Fontana, Calif. According to the company, Morin has a combined production capacity of over 50 million square feet, fabricating metal panels in more than 75 different profiles. MORIN Single Element panels are 100 percent recyclable and meet the requirements for the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System.

Morin hires Alec Schumacher

Alec Schumacher

Symmetrical Metal Panels Create Watertight Seam

Morin, a Kingspan Group company, has introduced the SymmeTry Roof Series, a mechanically seamed structural roof system that is symmetrical and hydrostatic by design.

Morin, a Kingspan Group company, has introduced the SymmeTry Roof Series, a mechanically seamed structural roof system that is symmetrical and hydrostatic by design.

Morin, a Kingspan Group company, has introduced the SymmeTry Roof Series, a mechanically seamed structural roof system that is symmetrical and hydrostatic by design. A symmetrical metal roof system does not “lap” over an adjacent panel like standard asymmetrical panels. Symmetrical panels install side by side and have a mechanically seamed “cap” that has two beads of continuous butyl sealant, creating a watertight seam. MORIN’s SymmeTry Roof Series vertical panel legs range from 1 1/2 to 3 inches in height. Because they are bidirectional, the panels can be installed going left to right, right to left, and start from any point of the roof. Symmetrical panels are specified and installed to allow for unlimited thermal expansion and contraction, providing the advantage of installing panels up to 300 feet in length.

Morin Partners with D.I. Roof Seamers

Morin, a Kingspan Group company, announces a partnership with D.I. Roof Seamers to provide customers with seamers for MORIN roofing products.

“The partnership with D.I. Roof Seamers will contribute to two key factors in the growth of MORIN,” said Scott Evans, operations director at MORIN. “First, it will allow MORIN to focus on its core business, which is Single Element Panels. Second, it provides a better avenue for our customers. D.I. offers training classes, online ordering, an impressive seamer maintenance program as well as new and innovative seamers to better support our customers’ needs. In short, the partnership benefits our customers through continued quality and improved customer service.”

MORIN installers needing seamers for MorZip, SRR and SLR (2-inch 90 degrees and 180 degrees) metal roofs can find them at a website created by D.I. Roof Seamers.

“We provide seamers for 35 roof panel manufacturers in the United States and Canada and we do it well,” said Kevin Thomas, director of sales at D.I. Seamers. “When we met with the management team of MORIN, we saw the same kind of commitment to excellence for providing quality products and customer service. The partnership was a natural fit.”

D.I. Roof Seamers calls the site a one-stop experience to secure the rental of seaming tools, review manuals on equipment, view videos, peruse the FAQs section and learn more about D.I. Roof Seamers. Access the D.I. Roof Seamers/Morin Rental Request Form.

Matt Martino Joins Morin as Vice President of Sales and Marketing

Matt Martino is joining Morin, a Kingspan Group company, in the role of vice president of Sales and Marketing effective June 1. Martino will oversee and manage six Morin regional sales managers and five independent representative groups across the U.S.

“Matt’s most recent experience with Kingspan Benchmark is both strategic and advantageous, bringing with him his keen technical knowledge of our industry and in particular our metal panel systems; the key players and challenges facing the architectural and design communities,” says Ilhan Eser, CEO of Morin.

“As a leader in architectural single component products, we need to make it a priority to support the architectural community,” Martino adds. “That means being a partner with our customers as opposed to simply a supplier. It also means that, with the advent of systems like Karrier Panel, we need to be a design-stage resource for questions regarding not just aesthetics but also things like proper air, water, thermal and vapor barrier design. If we want to be more than just a cladding element, it will be our job to educate and assist the market as such.”

Morin is a versatile manufacturers of single-element metal wall and roof panel systems. With production facilities in Bristol, Conn.; Deland, Fla.; and Fontana, Calif., MORIN has a combined production capacity of over 50 million square feet, fabricating metal panels in more than 75 different profiles. MORIN Single Element panels are 100 percent recyclable and meet the requirements for the U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. Morin’s nationwide sales network and in-house technical service teams are dedicated to providing innovative solutions for today’s progressive architecture. Access profiles, specifications, CAD details, load span charts and technical manuals.