N.B. Handy Becomes Stocking Provider of Roofinox Line of Stainless Metal Roofing Materials

Dave Rowe, vice president of Roofinox America of Eatontown, N.J., has announced that N.B. Handy, the Lynchburg, Va., based supplier of metals, metal fabricating machinery, and sheet metal for the roofing and HVAC trades, has become a stocking provider of the Roofinox line of stainless steel and tin-plated (Terne) stainless metal roofing materials.

Dave Rowe notes: “We are pleased to welcome the N.B. Handy Co. to our distribution network. This arrangement gives N.B. Handy a proven stainless steel roofing product it can confidently offer to customers, knowing it will be embraced for its durability, corrosion resistance and visual appeal.” It also provides N.B. Handy with a product “for its architectural network that is quite malleable and easy to rollform—something specifically absent from the marketplace since Follansbee closed its doors and cut off the supply of TCS II to the American market,” says Rowe. He adds that, “architects will be particularly happy with its availability for restoration and historic projects.”

With the new arrangement, N.B. Handy will offer its customers the capability to produce structural roofing profiles with premier stainless steel and tin plated (Terne) stainless steel roofing materials. Tony Bonavito, vice president of Procurement and Supplier Management at N.B. Handy notes, “We are excited about this development because providing the Roofinox stainless materials allows us to offer a full line of products and finishes to our customers.”

Project Profiles: Historic Renovation

Maine State House Dome Restoration, Augusta, Maine

Team

COPPERSMITH: The Heritage Co., Waterboro, Maine
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Consigli Construction Co. Inc., Portland, Maine
ARCHITECT: LEO A DALY, Minneapolis
ENGINEER: Becker Structural Engineers, Portland

To remain proportional with the larger building, a new, higher copper-covered dome was built to replace the original cupola.

To remain proportional with the larger building, a new, higher copper-covered dome was built to replace the original cupola.

Roof Materials

Working 200 feet in the air on elaborate staging, carpenters, coppersmiths, engineers and other construction workers replaced more than 7,000 square feet of copper on the dome. The existing unique, curved copper components were carefully removed and saved to serve as models for the new components.

A full sheet-metal shop, consisting of an 8-foot brake, 52-inch jump shear and benches, was set up onsite at the 63-foot elevation mark, along with five cases of 20-ounce copper (about 12,880 pounds). Each copper component was carefully measured, cut and bent onsite, and then installed.

The compound curving components were made in The Heritage Co.’s “home” shop, using a shrinker/stretcher machine and an English wheel. Then, the copper was handformed over custom-made wood forms. Care was taken to exactly match the size and configuration of the existing components, as well as the seam layouts that were prevalent in the original copper work

Approximately 15 to 18 percent of the copper was waste because of the curved nature of many of the components. The waste was made into copper clip stock for the roof installation or recycled.

COPPER MANUFACTURER: Revere Copper Products Inc.
COPPER SUPPLIER: Beacon Sales Co.

Roof Report

The Maine State House was originally designed by renowned architect Charles Bulfinch in 1832. The dome was added in 1910 as part of a major remodeling and expansion project that ultimately created the building’s current appearance based on designs by G. Henri Desmond.

The original façade was preserved during remodeling, though the length of the building was doubled to 300 feet by extending the north and south wings. To remain proportional with the larger building, a new, higher copper-covered dome was built to replace the original cupola. The new dome rises to a height of 185 feet and is topped by a gold-clad copper statue, called “Lady Wisdom”, designed by W. Clark Noble.

Over time, weather damage and holes caused by hail strikes on the top of the dome caused leaks in the building. The seams between the copper sheets also caused problems for the underlying steel and concrete structure of the dome. The work included the installation of expansion joints, repairs to prevent water infiltration and restoration of the cupola (located between the top of the dome and Lady Wisdom), using a highly durable paint system. Lighting upgrades, copper repairs and the restoration of the gilded Lady Wisdom statue located atop the dome were also part of the project.

The dome’s structural system and framing were analyzed by Becker Structural Engineering one year in advance of dome construction, so Consigli Construction could create a 3-D model for staging to eliminate interior shoring.

Overall, this project restored one of Maine’s most significant historic landmark buildings, returning its signature copper dome and gilded Lady Wisdom sculpture to their original intended conditions.

PHOTO: Consigli Construction Co. Inc.

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Projects: Education

University of Virginia, Rotunda, Charlottesville

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819.

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819.

TEAM

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: W.A. Lynch Roofing, Charlottesville
ARCHITECT: John G. Waite Associates, Albany, N.Y.
JOINT-VENTURE BUILDER: Christman-Gilbane, Reston, Va., ChristmanCo.com and GilbaneCo.com
LEAD-ABATEMENT CONTRACTOR: Special Renovations Inc., Chesterfield, Va.

ROOF MATERIALS

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper. W.A. Lynch Roofing sheared 4,000 individual tiles to approximate dimensions in its sheet-metal shop, and a makeshift sheet-metal shop was set up on top of the scaffolding to complete the final measurements and exact cuts.

COPPER SUPPLIER: N.B. Handy Co., Lynchburg, Va.
COPPER MANUFACTURER: Hussey Copper, Leetsdale, Pa.

ROOF REPORT

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819. Jefferson modeled his design—presented to the university board in 1821—after the Pantheon in Rome. Although he died in 1826 while the Rotunda was still under construction, the stunning building housed the university’s library as Jefferson envisioned.

The rotunda renovation is a two-phase project, and roofing work was part of Phase 1. The roofing team believed seven months was adequate to complete the job; the university, however, requested it be complete by April 2013 so scaffolding would be removed in time for the commencement ceremony. That gave the team a four-month timeline.

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper.

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper.

Tom McGraw, executive vice president of W.A. Lynch Roofing, explains: “This was just short of impossible even if it wasn’t winter. But as a graduate of UVA, I recognized the basis of the request and agreed to it. So we doubled the manpower and went to a 10-hour day, seven-day a week schedule. We divided the roof into four equal quadrants, each separated by an expansion joint and put a crew in each area working simultaneously with the other three. We also added support personnel in our sheet-metal shop, as well as runners to keep the flow of material to the job site on schedule for the sheet-metal mechanics. In the final analysis, we made the schedule and completed our work within the owner’s request.”

The roofing project was essential because of rust on the previous terne-coated metal roof. It was determined the rust was caused by inadequate roof ventilation that created condensation on the underside of the metal roofing. Ventilation was lacking because of a Guastavino tile dome that was installed in 1895. The condensation was addressed by installing a concealed venting system at the intersections of the treads and risers at the seven steps in the roof, as well as at the top of the dome below the oculus. “Heated air has low density so it will logically rise creating natural convection,” McGraw notes. “This convection creates air movement below the roof and minimizes dead air spaces and the potential for condensation. The key to this is ensuring that you size the ‘intake’ venting similar to the ‘exhaust’ venting so that air will flow in an unrestricted fashion.”

Reroofing a dome can be a challenge, and determining how to keep the interior and its priceless valuables dry required some ingenuity. McGraw invented a tarp that he compares to a hooped skirt to keep the space watertight. The roofing crew cut trapezoidal sections of EPDM membrane and installed them from the bottom to the top of the dome. This skirt-like tarp was configured out of eight pieces at the bottom, six at the midpoint and four at the top. The maximum cut sizes for each level were determined using a computer drawing. Creating the EPDM covering in sections made the tarp easy to handle and remove. “If we seamed it all together or made it in less pieces, the guys wouldn’t have been able to lift it,” McGraw adds.

The tear-off process involved removing the painted metal panels according to lead-abatement standards; the panels were cleaned offsite to maintain the integrity and safety of the job site. A new wood deck was installed on furring over the tiles. This was covered with 30-pound roofing felt and red rosin building paper followed by the new copper roof.

Each piece of copper was tinned and folded before being installed. This process was necessary because of the lack of symmetry on the building. McGraw recalls: “Because this building is almost 200-years old, you have to recognize that not everything is as true and square as one might hope. There are seven steps that circle the base of the dome, and each tread and riser changed in height and width all the way around the building.”

This is the fourth roof for the Rotunda. The first was a tin-plate roof designed by Thomas Jefferson; the second was copper that was a replacement roof after a fire in 1895; the third roof was painted terne-coated steel from 1976; and the current roof is 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper that will be painted white. The decision to select copper was based on cost, durability and historic appearance.

Phase 2 of the project began in May, and the Rotunda will be closed for repairs until 2016. At a price of $42.5 million, utility, fire protection and mechanical upgrades will be made, as well as a Dome Room ceiling replacement and construction of a new underground service vault. The roof also will be painted white, and leaking gutters will be repaired during this phase.

PHOTOS: DAN GROGAN PHOTOGRAPHY

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N.B. Handy Showcases Sheet Metal Machinery During ‘Spring Fling 2014’

The N.B. Handy Company held its “Spring Fling 2014” Machinery Show on April 28-30 in Lynchburg, Va. Top roofing vendors brought their machines and worked with Paul Seufer, general manager at N.B. Handy, to showcase profitability through productivity.

The “Spring Fling” is the largest architectural sheet metal show under one roof in the Mid Atlantic Region. Attendees saw live demonstrations of the full suite of machinery products, including Quadro pan former, Lockformer CNC plasma cutter, Norlok metal fastening machine, Flagler Offset Snaplock machine and an ironworker to manufacture gutter brackets and punch holes.

Participating vendors were excited to travel from all over the country to meet with N.B. Handy customers and engage and share in the concepts and technologies being highlighted. The crowd saw lots of machines, asked questions and observed demonstrations with their own spec parts. Several customers took advantage of show specials to help them get the best machines into their shops now, at the beginning of the construction season.

Seufer took the opportunity of having the show serve a dual purpose; he held a roofing hands-on training session for the N.B. Handy roofing staff members and the employees at their subsidiary company, Morris Ginsberg. To qualify for participation, each person had to pass a pre-test to prove they were prepared to build a roof. The group worked as a cohesive crew to build a mock-up of a roof, incorporating ANSI and SPRI National Standards. This invaluable exercise showed the team what their contractors do on a daily basis.

“The Spring Fling was a place for everyone to bring their curiosity about the roofing industry and see for themselves, through a working exhibition, the incredible array of machines available today that keep us productive and profitable,” Seufer says.

N.B. Handy, headquartered in Lynchburg, Va., has 14 strategically located, full-service sales and distribution facilities in Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia.

During the Spring Fling, a hands-on training session took place for the N.B. Handy roofing staff and the employees of N.B. Handy's subsidiary company Morris Ginsberg

During the Spring Fling, a hands-on training session took place for the N.B. Handy roofing staff and the employees of N.B. Handy’s subsidiary company Morris Ginsberg.