NRCA to Launch its ProCertification, Worker Training Initiative in 2018

To address the great need for skilled workers in the roofing industry, NRCA is launching a national worker certification initiative, ProCertification, later this year. The program will provide those interested in entering the industry with a clear career path based on industry-specific training courses and earned credentials.

ProCertification is comprised of two separate components: Training and Certifications.

Training

ProCertification training programs will teach installation skills to roofing field employees in roof system installation, waterproofing, rooftop solar, and repair and maintenance.

Because every roofing contractor operates his or her company differently and uses different manufacturers’ materials, the purpose of ProCertification is to teach comprehension and skills based on industry standards and best practices presented in The NRCA Roofing Manual. Roof system installers will be directed to follow instructions of their foremen, who are responsible for directing crews to adhere to manufacturers instruction and company practices.

ProCertification training programs to be released in 2018 are: basic roofing skills; low-slope decks, insulation and flashing concepts; and thermoplastic single-ply roof system installation.

Trainers throughout the U.S. will be qualified by NRCA and trained to help installers learn and practice skills necessary to successfully complete ProCertification training

Certification

Certification through this program enables experienced roofing professionals to demonstrate they can perform the work to industry standards. Participants will be able to earn certifications in all major roof system, waterproofing and rooftop solar installations, as well as roof system repair and maintenance.

Hands-on skills of ProCertification participants will be verified by NRCA Qualified Assessors. Online training for assessors will be available summer 2018.

For more information, visit www.nrca.net/NRCA-ProCertification.

Upgrade to a Learning Management System

The first stone tools were made and used by early humans nearly 2.5 million years ago. As man evolved, so did the tools, transforming from blunt objects to precision equipment capable of greater rates of productivity and improved craftsmanship.

These days, tools aren’t the only advancements helping us do our jobs. During the past 10 years, safety training and compliance have evolved into a Learning Management System (LMS). An LMS is a software application for the administration, documentation, tracking, reporting and delivery of training programs.

BENEFITS

Learning Management System

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To better demonstrate the strategic value of an LMS, let’s look at the competitive profile comparing instructor-led training to LMS training. In the figure, the horizontal axis of the competitive profile captures the range of factors on which LMS and instructor-led training solutions compete. There are six principle factors:

    ▪▪ PRICE: The cost to set up and deliver an employee training solution.
    ▪▪ PERFORMANCE: Training that goes beyond introducing knowledge and generates behavior change, driving improved individual, team and organizational performance.
    ▪▪ ENGAGEMENT: Instructionally sound, visually appealing and interactive training programs that engage individuals throughout the learning.
    ▪▪ EASE OF USE: Easy set up and maintenance of the training and delivery system.
    ▪▪ CONVENIENCE: Easy employee access to the training, anytime and anywhere. This includes the office, the job site or even at home. Management can access records from mobile workstations without having to be in the office.
    ▪▪ MEASUREMENT: Easy and cost-effective learner tracking, measurement and reporting.

The figure shows LMS and instructor-led training score high for Performance, Engagement and Ease of Use. However, instructor-led training, relatively speaking and largely due to its inherent lack of convenience, is expensive (in addition to paying the training company, think travel and/or time away from the job for the trainees) and, therefore, it gets a low score on Convenience and Price.

In addition, LMS allows the employer the opportunity to automate the training process, deliver offline training and ensure continued compliance. To automate training, the employer creates a list of trainings needed by job description. These lists are then used to create a learning plan. When the employer puts a new employee into the system, the LMS will automatically assign the training content via the job description. The employer then monitors the system to ensure the employee is completing his or her training.

If the employer chooses not to use automation to assign training inside of the LMS, he or she can manually assign training courses one at a time through the system. This may be done to reissue a training course because of a workplace incident.

DID YOU KNOW?

More than 40 percent of global
Fortune 500 companies are
using some form of a Learning
Management System.

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