Solar Roof Dynamics Announces Management Additions

Solar Roof Dynamics (SRD) of Davis, Calif., has announced two new additions to their executive management team, Debbie Schrider as its new vice president of sales and Nick Lowrie as its director of operations.

Schrider joins SRD bringing with her 25 years of sales and management experience, most of which was based in residential new construction and the solar industry. With almost 10 years of experience in solar, she had held leadership positions at SolarCity and SunEdison, where she focused on customer acquisition, and One Block Off the Grid, where she helped pioneer remote-based solar sales.

Lowrie comes to SRD with solar operations and design experience and a track record of building high performance operations teams. Most notably, Lowrie spent eight years building the Northern California operations for SolarCity.

“I am elated to bring Debbie Schrider and Nick Lowrie onto our team during a time of growth,” CEO Aaron Nitzkin states. “Their wealth of experience and innovative spirit will bring great results for Solar Roof Dynamics and our Signature Dealer Network.”

Coated Metals Group Expands Operation Facility

Coated Metals Group has expanded its Indianapolis location with an addition to its operation facility. The expansion has increased the building’s square footage by over 50 percent, allowing CMG to ramp up their on-hand inventory and production.

Company President, Gary Woodward states, “Expansion in our Indianapolis plant was overdue. Our growth in this region had been outpacing our capacity for some time. The capacity we have added will allow us to maintain more on-hand inventories and meet customer needs with enhanced efficiency.”

Doug Riley, Indianapolis’ sales representative, believes this expansion demonstrates CMG’s focus on improving the customer experience. “I believe our addition demonstrates to both our current and prospective customers our level of commitment to providing them with quality customer service and materials.”

CMG Opens Distribution Center, Expands Operations

Coated Metals Group expands its operations by opening a new distribution center in Phoenix.  Leading the staff at the facility are General Manager Jeff Larson and Account Manager Rusty Vandall. 
 
The Arizona distribution center has been an anticipated addition to CMG. Company president Gary Woodward states, “We’re thrilled to finally be opening our doors in the Phoenix-metro area. Our business in this region has expanded over recent years and we’ve looked forward to opening a branch facility there for some time. We are very excited to expand our reach and offer improved service and lead times with a full complement of inventory available on-hand and ready for delivery.” 
 
General Manager Jeff Larson was previously employed with CMG for eight years before moving out of state for other opportunities.  The CMG team welcomes Jeff’s return. “Jeff was a valuable member of the CMG team for many years. So we were disappointed to lose him when he left to pursue other opportunities.  We are pleased to welcome Jeff back and happy that he’ll be spearheading the new Phoenix branch. Jeff’s experience, attention to detail, and focus on customer satisfaction will ensure that customers in the region will benefit from a high level of service,” says Gary Woodward. 
 
Rusty Vandall is a newcomer to CMG and will be supporting the new distribution center in the role of Account Manager.  Rusty is a resident of the Phoenix area and comes to CMG with 25 years of customer service experience.  When asked why he chose to join the CMG team, Rusty states, “I am excited to join CMG because of their reputation and attitude to always taking care of their customer.”  
 
CMG”s new facility will stock a full assortment of inventory in coil and sheets, with the ability to offer slit coils that can be spun down into custom lengths.  Route truck delivery will be available to the Phoenix metro area. 

Ashland Reveals New Corporate Identity and Organizational Culture

Ashland took another step in its plan for the future, revealing its “Always Solving” corporate identity and unveiling the organizational culture that will continue to differentiate the company as it continues its mission.

“We’ve been on a journey since announcing plans to separate Valvoline and Ashland into two standalone companies,” says Bill Wulfsohn, Ashland chairman and chief executive officer. “Today, both companies are positioned for bright futures.”

Along with his leadership team, Wulfsohn developed a strategy which empowers each of Ashland’s chemical businesses to develop its own strategic approach as to where to compete and how to win in their marketplace. Each will employ its own core competencies in problem-solving that brings value to customers. Together as one global team, Ashland will build an organization focused on innovation, operations, and capital deployment. Its foundation will continue to be built on operations. Ashland will continue fostering growth through innovations and sales opportunities, and continue capturing value delivered to customers while driving cost competitiveness.

The most public facing element of the evolution of Ashland, is its new corporate identity – Always Solving – which reflects the company’s positioning and people across diverse industries as broad as pharmaceuticals to automotive, personal care to paints, adhesives to biofunctionals, and more.

“Now is the time for Ashland to communicate the nature of who we are and what sets our employees apart. We’re a company of solvers who develop solutions to complex problems in applied chemistry, pushing the boundaries of what’s possible, and advancing the competitiveness of our customers across industries,” states Carolmarie Brown, Ashland director global marketing and business communications.

The positioning illustrates how Ashland acts as a partner to its customers, providing solutions that bring value to its business partners. In particular, the company is focused on innovations for growing market positions in segments such as pharmaceuticals, personal care and paints and coatings.

Today and moving forward, Ashland embodies how its people are distinguished by their ability to apply specialized chemistry with a disciplined approach that increases the efficacy, refines the usability, adds to the allure, ensures the integrity, and improves the profitability of their customers’ products and applications. Each of these qualities are manifested in different ways for different industries, and together, its people around the globe are always solving, to improve customers’ products. “In Ashland we bring together different backgrounds, different disciplines, different points of view, and we operate as one team with a sense of purpose,” said Luis Fernandez-Moreno, senior vice president of Ashland and president of the Chemicals Group.

Along with its strategy and identity is the articulation and implementation of a collective Ashland Way, its corporate culture, which is “to respect, protect, and advance the people we work with, companies we serve, shareholders who invest in our future, communities we’re a part of, and the planet we share.”

The Ashland Way will drive business growth and shape an organization of which employees will want to be a part. Values of safety, integrity, partnership and passion will guide behavior each day.

“We have a common understanding of how we operate, think, manage, encourage and act in order to build an organization and improve the world through solutions based on the application of specialty ingredients and materials,” Wulfsohn says.

Ashland has a focus on operations and has been committed to doing business with integrity and respect for all people and the world. The company has made formal commitments to improve the environmental, health, safety and security performance for facilities, processes and products throughout the entire operating system. Forty-six Ashland sites have received Responsible Care certification, including three facilities earlier this year.

FlashCo Manufacturing Inc. Hires Plant Manager

Matt Froehlich is hired as plant manager for FlashCo Manufacturing Inc.

Matt Froehlich is hired as plant manager for FlashCo Manufacturing Inc.

FlashCo Manufacturing Inc. hired Matt Froehlich as plant manager for the Chicago location. Matt brings to FlashCo over 14 years of experience in supply chain management and manufacturing. Matt will be responsible for developing and leading the Midwest plant, supporting FlashCo’s market expansion, lean system development and operations.

Matt brings a wealth of experience to FlashCo and has worked with a number of manufacturing companies in Michigan and California developing lean oriented supply chain management systems. Most recently, Matt was supply chain director for IDEX Corporation in Rohnert Park, Calif., responsible for customer service, warehouse and purchasing. Throughout his career, Matt has been adept at utilizing lean philosophies to identify supply chain issues, eliminate waste and increase asset utilization. Matt has a BA in Supply Chain Management from Michigan State University and a Master of Science in Management from Walsh College.

“We are developing a presence in the Midwest,” says Greg Morrow, president of FlashCo, “so we were looking for a leader for our Chicago plant. Matt brings us a combination of knowledge in operations, plant management and implementing lean oriented supply chains. We are excited to have Matt build a functioning operation and carry out our commitment to customer satisfaction with respect and a can-do attitude.”

Construction of Additional SOPREMA Facility Enables Increased Roofing and Waterproofing Resin Production

SOPREMA breaks ground for a new construction project.

SOPREMA breaks ground for a new construction project.

SOPREMA, a roofing and waterproofing resin manufacturer, breaks ground for a construction project to expand its Wadsworth, Ohio, campus. The additional facility is anticipated to add jobs to the Wadsworth community.

The building will encompass approximately 25,000 square feet of space and allow for additional roofing and waterproofing resin production in the United States, offering shorter lead times and manufacturing operations for customers across North America.

“The addition of our Wadsworth manufacturing facility affirms our commitment to growing within our community,” says Sara Jonas, marketing manager, SOPREMA. “The Wadsworth facility will continue SOPREMA’s focus to advance and provide our industry with performance roofing and waterproofing resin systems, while also enhancing our innovation capabilities, says Tim Kersey, VP/GM.”

NIBS States Proposed ABA Resolution to Make Codes and Standards Free Could Reduce Safety

The National Institute of Building Sciences issued an open letter to delegates attending the American Bar Association (ABA) Annual Meeting in August informing of the potential impacts if they vote to support a proposed resolution. The resolution—which advocates that copyrighted codes and standards incorporated by reference in legislation and regulation be made available for free—would alter the way codes and standards are developed in the United States.

In the U.S. construction industry alone, there are hundreds of copyrighted codes and standards that impact everything from seismic requirements and wind loads to water use and life safety. The standards developing organizations (SDOs) that develop these codes and standards have thousands of members, employees and volunteers that participate in the process to incorporate best practices and lessons learned to improve the standards. Each industry, from aeronautics and agricultural to electronics and telecommunications, has a similar structure and industry participation to address their specific needs. Such standards improve safety, drive innovation and improve commerce, both domestically and around the world.

The U.S. Government recognizes the benefit of private industry standards development, as directed by the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (NTTAA, P.L. 104-113) and Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-119.

If the ABA’s suggested resolution and related advocacy campaign is successful, private-sector-developed standards would be subject to new requirements due to their incorporation by reference in legislation and regulation, and the ability for SDOs to recoup development costs would change considerably.

The development of codes and standards is expensive. Today, the cost is born by those who are ultimately impacted by the standards (whether by participating in the process or purchasing the resulting document). By making such information free online, the ABA resolution would hamper cost recovery through such mechanisms. The result would be that private-sector organizations may no longer be able to invest in the development process, leaving existing standards to remain stagnant (and thus inhibiting innovation) and shifting the responsibility (and expense) of developing future standards to the government.

ABA’s proposed resolution attempts to mitigate any copyright concerns by encouraging government agencies to negotiate licenses with SDOs. However, this change would require agencies to hire staff and implement contracting mechanisms, making it necessary for tax payers to cover the cost of standards development.

The National Institute of Building Sciences—which was established by the U.S. Congress to work with both the public and private sectors to advance building science and the design, construction and operations of buildings to meet national goals of health, safety and welfare—is extremely concerned that the ABA is advocating a one-size-fits-all legislative vehicle that will alter the long-standing tradition of private-sector-developed standards in the United States. The result could reduce safety, increase costs and add a burden to the government and tax-paying citizens.

In lieu of moving forward with the resolution, the Institute suggests the ABA focus on engaging in a meaningful dialogue with the SDO community to help address the changing nature of access to copyrighted materials through the internet and other electronic sources, and, after taking the long-term goals and impacts into consideration, identify a mutually acceptable path forward.

Read the letter.