Data Can’t Replace a Commitment to Safety

I recently read a paper titled “Predictive Analytics in Workplace Safety: Four ‘Safety Truths’ that Reduce Workplace Injuries”, published by Pittsburgh-based Predictive Solutions. The company offers a variety of safety solutions to help customers improve and sustain their safety program results. The article stated that predictive analytics help many organizations gain insight into their operations and use their resources in the most effective way. These models predict the likelihood, frequency and location of workplace injuries using the customers’ safety-observation data.

How can workplace injuries be predicted? Predictive analytics draws real-time conclusions about future risk using safety-observation data. For instance, the company’s “Red Flag” model identifies projects, sites or work groups that show characteristics at a higher risk of incidents.

In addition, Predictive Solutions offers consulting services that drive culture and process change within organizations to create sustainable workplace injury prevention programs. In my experience, a company’s culture is the most important aspect in reducing workplace injuries. Predicting occupational accidents, incidents and injuries is great as long as an employer is willing to change its company culture. One does not need a library of data to determine there is a problem in a company. On the other hand, experience tells me that extensive OSHA citations, high EMR (Experience Modification Rating), high workers’ compensation premiums and high employee-turnover rates are indicators of a company in need of a safety program. How the ownership, management, and workforce view safety is the real key to preventing workplace incidents and accidents. A mountain of data is useless without a commitment to make changes within a company.

For data to make a difference in an organization, a safety program must be in effect in the company. A safety program primarily requires a firm commitment from the owners and top management, as well as buy-in from all employees and all levels of management.

Secondly, a written HASP (Health and Safety Plan) that documents the firm’s commitment should be in place. For help in developing a health and safety plan, a company can hire a consultant or a safety professional; contact the OSHA area office; or visit OSHA’s website.

In addition, training must be included in the program. This training must follow all the pertinent OSHA standards. The most important standards for the roofing industry to follow are fall protection, scaffolding and powered industrial trucks.

Finally, it is important to provide feedback through job-site audits and inspections. These inspections can be performed in-house by managers, supervisors or a safety professional. Through inspections, the company can determine if its program is working.

Collecting data for the sake of collecting data is absolutely useless without a viable documented safety culture. Training and inspection programs must also be in place to address the data that has been collected.

Safety Railing System Provides Fall Protection around Roof Hatch Openings

The BILCO Co. has introduced the BIL-Guard 2.0, the second generation of its safety railing system.

The BILCO Co. has introduced the BIL-Guard 2.0, the second generation of its safety railing system.

The BILCO Co. has introduced the BIL-Guard 2.0, the second generation of its safety railing system. The BIL-Guard 2.0, like its predecessor, is a fixed railing system that provides a permanent means of fall protection around roof hatch openings. The new and improved model will be available this summer and boasts aluminum construction for increased strength and rigidity, a redesigned self-closing hinge and positive latching system, and stainless steel hardware throughout. The product is available in mill finish aluminum and with a safety yellow powder-coat paint finish.

Also compliant with OSHA fall protection standards (29 CFR 1910.23), the BIL-Guard 2.0 features an innovative mounting system that does not penetrate the roofing membrane. The new system is easy to install and does not require special training or certification for proper installation. The design features quick-mount curb brackets for a fast, secure attachment and pivoting mounting sleeves with compression fittings to lock the railing system into place. The BIL-Guard 2.0 is also equipped with a standard self-closing gate to maintain continuous fall protection to ensure that OSHA compliance is preserved.

Are Union Workers Safer?

A colleague recently shared an article with me about the differences in accident and incident re- porting in unionized roofing construction compared with non-union firms. The study, “Protecting Construction Worker Health and Safety in Ontario, Canada”, which was conducted by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH), a non-profit research organization headquartered in Toronto, suggests unionized construction firms experience fewer serious and costly injuries than non-union firms. The IWH study states construction firms that employ union workers have fewer work injuries that require workers’ compensation payments for time away from work.

Although the IWH study was conducted in Canada, it has direct implications for the roofing industry in the U.S. According to Injury Facts, a publication of the Itasca, Ill.-based U.S. National Safety Council, 74,500 construction workers suffered “lost-time” injuries in 2014. Lost-time injuries are on-the-job injuries serious enough that they keep workers from doing their jobs and require costly workers’ compensation reimbursements.

The IWH study’s findings indicate unions, as well as unionized construction firms, may encourage occupational injury reporting and reduce risks through training, hazard identification and control.

To unionize or not to unionize? That is the question that has gone on since unions first began to organize. I myself am a union journeyman, but I see the positive and negative aspects to both sides. In the construction trades, unions are hiring halls for skilled workers. Workers will either shape up or wait to be called for work on a daily basis. These workers will be at one site for a while, get laid off, then simply move on to another site. Union tradesmen have no vested interest in a company, whereas company employees’ livelihoods depend on the company doing well.

Whether union or non-union, I believe the discrepancy lies in company culture. Employees of non-union roofing firms may not report minor injuries or work-related illnesses because they may be afraid of being fired or that reporting would have a negative impact on the company. In addition, the owner and management of a company may not be aware of the implications of not reporting—or underreporting. And there’s always the possibility that this male-dominated culture may frown on reporting as being weak.

Unfortunately, there are roofers who believe they cannot compete if they follow OSHA and other governmental standards. More often, some roofers hire day-laborers and give them no training and no workers’ compensation benefits. I have heard stories of some of these workers being injured and dumped out of the back of a pickup truck at a local emergency room like garbage.

On the other hand, I have worked with non-union firms that place a high value on safety. The owners of these companies demand even the smallest incidents be reported. Perhaps this is so they can track trends in the workplace: If there are many employees being injured in the same way, the company can take steps to fix the issue.

Also, minor injuries, if not treated immediately, can become major hospitalizations. Imagine a worker steps on a nail, then keeps working. The wound becomes infected and septicemia develops. The worker ends up in the hospital. In keeping with the new OSHA reporting standard, OSHA must be called within 24 hours of the injury. This may spark an OSHA inspection of the company’s site.

Another example: An employee twists his lower back on the job, then proceeds to “work through it.” He goes to bed that night and in the morning the pain is so severe he can’t get out of bed. Now we’re dealing with a lost-time incident that must be documented on the 300 Log. Beyond that, how does the employer know it truly happened on the job and not outside?

Union roofing firms tend to be larger in scope. They tend to do mostly higher-dollar-value jobs. For this reason, union roofing firms tend to keep better records, which is important in the case of OSHA inspections or legal disputes over a workplace injury. Documentation—or lack thereof—will show whether an employee took all reasonable precautions to carry out his or her work safely, as well as prove whether all safe operating procedures were followed. Importantly, documentation can lower the liability that arises for failure to take reasonable care on the job site.

Documentation is also required in several OSHA standards. Under the OSHA Recordkeeping regulation (29 CFR 1904), covered employees are required to prepare and maintain records of serious occupational injuries and illnesses, using the OSHA 300 Log. This information is important for employers; insurance providers; workers; and OSHA in evaluating the safety of a workplace, understanding industry hazards, and implementing worker protections to reduce and eliminate hazards.

Employers who cannot or will not see the value of providing a safe and healthful workplace and who believe they should not have to follow governmental regulations end up being a burden on society—because when their workers get killed or seriously injured, it is a burden on everyone. Unions can’t completely stop these problems, but they can help to alleviate them through member training.

A Roofer’s Guide to Safely Navigating the OSHA Employee Interview Process

The information contained in this article is for general educational information only. This information does not constitute legal advice, is not intended to constitute legal advice, nor should it be relied upon as legal advice for your specific factual pattern or situation.

OSHA is asking questions. Are your employees ready to answer? When OSHA visits your next job site they will undoubtedly engage in what is known as the “Employee Interview” stage of the inspection. This is the part of the OSHA inspection where the compliance officer has the right to take your employees aside and interview them regarding company safety and health policies. The inspector will attempt to question your employees on everything from fall-protection equipment, company-training practices and site-specific hazards. If your employees are prepared for these interviews and remember they have certain fundamental rights the OSHA inspector may not violate, your company has a much better chance of avoiding costly OSHA citations.

What Will OSHA Ask My Employees?

The OSHA inspector will without hesitation ask your employee if they have been trained on fall protection. The inspector will ask very specific questions regarding how the employee was trained, who performed the training and how often this training occurred. Employees need to be prepared to answer these questions, and company training policies should allow the employees to tell the inspector they are frequently trained by the company’s safety director or a third-party safety consultant. The employee should also be able to tell the inspector that he or she was trained once upon hire and retraining occurs at least once a year. Additionally, the employee will need to advise the inspector about any videos or lectures they are required to attend to complete the company’s training program. It will further support your defense if the employee notifies the inspector about any weekly toolbox talks or routine safety meetings they are made to attend at specific jobs.

All roofers should also be able to recite OSHA’s fall-protection standard. This has become a major source of citations in recent months and is easily preventable if employees are prepared for the OSHA interview. The employees must report to the OSHA inspector they are fully aware of OSHA’s regulation requiring the use of fall protection at heights of 6 feet or more above a lower level. It is not necessary for employees to identify the exact provision within the Code of Federal Regulations, but they must be able to tell the inspector they are trained to recall that regulations exist that require all employees working on a surface with unprotected sides and edges at 6 feet or more above a lower level be protected from falling by the use of a fall-protection system. The magic words required to support your company’s defense against this type of citation are 6 feet. The employee must tell the inspector they always wear fall protection when working at a height of 6 feet or more.

Another favorite interview tactic of the OSHA inspector is to question an employee on the dangers of a fall. Often times this question is so alarmingly simple roofers have trouble giving OSHA the correct answer. If OSHA asks employees if they are aware of what happens if someone falls from a roof, the best possible answer will always be to inform the inspector they have been trained to recognize death or serious injury can occur from a fall. If an employee makes the mistake of reporting to the inspector that falls are not always dangerous or that roofers can some-times survive a fall, there is a strong chance the company will be cited for an inability to properly train employee on the hazards associated with a fall.

OSHA inspectors also prefer to ask employees if all falls are preventable. Most roofers would immediately reply that falls are preventable but construction is a dangerous and high-risk profession. This is not the answer your employees should provide to OSHA. The administration wants to know your employees are trained to recognize the fact that all falls are preventable. An employee should never tell OSHA that injuries are an unpreventable reality on a construction site. If OSHA inspectors ask your employees if falls are preventable, the answer should always be to inform the inspector that all falls are 100 percent preventable.

Must My Employees Speak to the Inspector?

OSHA has what is referred to as administrative probable cause. This gives OSHA the legal right to enter your job site and begin an inspection. OSHA’s powers essentially allow the administration to conduct inspections at almost any active place of employment. However, these powers do not give OSHA inspectors the right to detain or hold anyone for questioning against their will. The employees’ participation in the OSHA inspection process is completely voluntary. An employee may, under their own free will, choose to speak to the inspector, or the employee may choose not to speak to the inspector. It is very important to remember that an employer must never instruct, order or command an employee not to speak with OSHA inspectors when they arrive onsite. However, the employer has the right to educate his or her employees that no one is required to speak with OSHA if they elect not to.

How Long Can the Inspector Speak to My Employees?

If your employees voluntarily choose to speak to the inspector, the interviews must be completed within a reasonable amount of time. The Occupational Safety and Health Act states the interviews are to be completed in a reasonable manner. Additionally, OSHA’s Field Operations Manual conditions that interviews are to be as brief as possible. With such open time limitations, there have been varying arguments by OSHA and employers as to exactly how long an OSHA inspector may speak with an employee. It is traditionally accepted OSHA may take no longer than five to 10 minutes for field interviews with company employees. This amount of time can be less or more, depending on the type of investigation, knowledge of the employee, or if the inspection involves any injuries or fatalities. It is highly recommended the employees know their rights before speaking with the inspector. These rights include the employee’s ability to stop the interview at any time if he or she feels uncomfortable or believes the interview has gone on too long.

Can Our Company Attorney Be Present?

In almost all investigations, non-supervisory employees must speak to the inspector without the assistance of counsel. Supervisors, crew leaders and foremen are all entitled to an attorney during their interview because of the supervisory nature of their position. Administrative case law has held that any employee who has been granted authority over other employees is considered a supervisor. This authority has been defined as any time an employee is granted the ability to control the method and manner in which he or she performs assigned tasks. Employees who are not given supervisory responsibility and who do not have the ability to control the method and manner of the assigned work may speak to the inspector in private. However, always recall the interview process is entirely voluntary and the employee may request a company representative attend the interview with them. This is very important and is often overlooked by companies during OSHA inspections. If the employee specifically and voluntarily requests the interview take place with a supervisor or attorney present, the OSHA inspector must submit to the employee’s wishes.

How Should an Employee Handle Questions Regarding Training?

Company safety policies and training programs should be comprehensive and effective at all times. These training sessions, retraining classes and field safety exercises should result in a roofing crew that can recognize all hazards relating to our industry. The employees should be trained on each and every safety protocol to prevent against these hazards. If company training programs address all these issues, the employee will have no problem informing OSHA he or she has been trained on all relevant safety regulations. An employer is almost guaranteed an automatic citation if an employee simply concedes to an inspector that he or she has never received training in an area of roofing safety.

Inspectors will ask employees very complicated and confusing questions on a job site. This has been a major factor in recent citations and has resulted in significant penalties against roofers across the nation. For example, inspectors will often use technical or scientific language in an attempt to confuse a roofing employee to the point where the roofer acknowledges he or she has never heard of such terms. This sort of behavior from OSHA inspectors should not be tolerated if your employees are properly educated and prepared for OSHA interviews. An employee should not be coerced into telling an inspector they have not been trained or do not recognize a specific safety hazard. Instead, the employee should inform the inspector the company’s training program includes all hazards a roofer could face on a job, and if the employee is ever unsure of how to handle a specific safety issue, he or she need only refer to the company safety manual, which is always on the job site in every company vehicle.

When OSHA arrives at your next project, remember the roofing contractor who has properly prepared his or her employees for OSHA interviews will prevail. Today’s contractors must consistently defend their companies against OSHA and the federal government’s increasing involvement in the construction industry. However, a well-educated crew who has been informed of their rights with regard to the OSHA interview process can make all the difference when defending your company against an OSHA citation.

The Spray Polyurethane Foam Alliance Recognizes CertainTeed Insulation Products

Thanks to an accreditation awarded by the Spray Polyurethane Foam Alliance Professional Certification Program (SPFA PCP), contractors can be confident that CertainTeed operates using the industry’s best practices for world-class spray foam insulation products, technical knowledge and training. CertainTeed is one of the first supplier companies in the spray polyurethane foam (SPF) industry to meet the rigorous demands of the respected professional organization’s certification program.

“We believe excellence in manufacturing the highest quality spray polyurethane foam products is just part of the equation,” says Ken Forsythe, manager of product marketing for CertainTeed Insulation. “Education and proper installation of building materials have always been top priorities with CertainTeed. SPF insulation is one of the more technical products to master, and our SPFA PCP supplier accreditation shows our dedication to partnering with building professionals well after the product leaves the factory.”

The SPFA PCP is an internationally recognized program built for those involved in the installation of spray polyurethane foam. Covering roofing and insulation applications, the program advocates industry best practices and safety. The new SPF Supplier Company Accreditation category is designed to increase the scope of the program, to include additional organizations and individuals which are key to the SPF supply chain, and to provide further distinction for those companies that invest in their people and customers.

The standards-driven program is ISO 17024 compliant and was developed by committees of industry stakeholders in collaboration with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in addition to other federal agencies and external stakeholders. It is offered both domestically and internationally.

“This prestigious achievement signifies CertainTeed’s adherence and commitment to the SPF industry’s best practices,” says Kelly Cook Marcavage, certification director for SPFA PCP. “It is an honor to work with such a dedicated company who shares our demand for the highest of standards and utmost professionalism.”

As part of the accreditation process, select CertainTeed personnel were required to become certified as SPF Insulation Supplier Representatives through the SPFA PCP. Criteria also included supplier offered training programs for contractors and best practices/risk management program verification.

How to Deal with an OSHA Inspection

Dealing with an OSHA inspection requires some knowledge of the Washington, D.C.- based Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s history and its background. OSHA is part of the U.S. Department of Labor and was created through the Williams-Steiger Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, which was signed into law on Dec. 29, 1970, by President Richard M. Nixon. Before OSHA, there were nearly 6,000 workplace fatalities annually, 50,000 deaths from workplace-related illnesses and 5.7 million non-fatal workplace injuries. Injuries alone cost American businesses more than $125 billion.

OSHA is responsible for worker safety and health protection, and it has made a significant difference in the safety and health of workers in all industries. Since its inception, OSHA helped cut the work-related fatality rate in half; worked with employers and employees to reduce injuries and illnesses by 40 percent; and reduced trenching and excavation fatalities by 35 percent. To accomplish these goals, OSHA encourages employers and employees to reduce workplace hazards and implement new safety and health programs, as well as improve existing ones.

Consequently, all U.S.-based businesses covered by the OSH Act are subject to inspection by OSHA compliance safety and health officers (CSHOs). Most inspections are conducted without advance notice. Because OSHA cannot inspect all 7 million workplaces it covers each year, it seeks to prioritize its focus on those that present imminent danger situations—hazards that could cause death or serious physical harm.

Keep in mind that OSHA considers an employee on a roof over 6-feet high without fall protection imminently dangerous.

Other high priorities include fatalities and catastrophes, which are any incidents involving the deaths or hospitalizations of three or more employees. These catastrophes must be reported to OSHA within eight hours. In addition, employers must report any employee hospitalizations, amputations or loss of an eye within 24 hours. Complaints, allegations of hazards or violations also receive high priority. Referrals of hazard information from other federal, state or local agencies; individuals; organizations; or the media receive consideration for inspection. Follow-ups—checks for abatement of violations cited during previous inspections—are conducted by the agency in certain circumstances. Planned or programmed investigations will sometimes be aimed at specific high-hazard industries or individual workplaces that have experienced high rates of injuries or illnesses.

Roofing is considered a high-hazard industry. Roofing job sites are highly visible and working roofers can be seen from several blocks away; therefore, possible infractions or violations are much more visible. As such, it is likely OSHA may come to visit your job site.

When a CSHO comes onsite, the first thing he or she is supposed to do is announce himself or herself to the management representative (the owner, superintendent, foreman or safety consultant). At this point, the CSHO will show his or her credentials—these credentials are similar and carry the same weight of law as those of an FBI agent. CSHOs also have a working relationship with other governmental agencies. An OSHA compliance officer can call in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, local Department of Environmental Protection, Department of Transportation, or U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement if he or she suspects other regulatory infringements.

At this point, the CSHO will conduct the opening conference and explain why this workplace was selected for inspection and describe the scope of the inspection. The employer will choose a representative to accompany the officer during the inspection. An authorized representative (often a union representative, someone designated by employee consensus or even the complainant) of the employees has the right to join the inspection. Regardless, the officer will consult privately with a reasonable number of employees during the inspection. The company representative may not be allowed to participate in these consultations. (Learn more in an OSHA Inspections Fact Sheet.)

Following the opening conference, the compliance officer and representatives will walk through the portions of the job site covered by the inspection, looking for hazards that could lead to employee injury or illness. The compliance officer also will review workplace injury and illness records and posting of the official OSHA poster.

During the walkthrough, the compliance officer may point out some violations that can be corrected immediately. Although the law requires these hazards be cited, prompt correction is a sign of good faith on the part of the employer. Compliance officers try to minimize work interruptions during the inspection and will keep confidential any trade secrets they observe. The only time a CSHO can stop a job is if an employee is in immediate danger.

As a professional safety consultant, I have been involved in numerous OSHA inspections. During these inspections, I collect information. I listen to what the CSHO has to say and take copious notes. I know the rules OSHA must follow and I note every possible mistake or shortcut the officer may make during the information-gathering process. While doing this, I am cordial with the officer; I speak politely and respectfully and as little as possible. The information I gather can sometimes be used at the informal hearing to get some of the citations lowered or, if OSHA is mistaken or has not followed its own protocols, removed completely.

In the meantime, I make sure my client immediately fixes any issues that OSHA has cited us on. Just like OSHA, I want all employees to be able to work safely and without the fear of injury and illness.

OSHA’s Focus Four

I’m a safety professional. It’s what I do. When I drive around my neighborhood, I observe the practices of roofers who are working. Rarely—if ever—do I see them using proper fall protection. It is upsetting to me because hundreds of roofers fall to their deaths in the U.S. every year, and fall-related standards are consistently in OSHA’s most cited standards.

The Washington, D.C.-based Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Focus Four are the four most common causes of death and serious injury in the construction industry. OSHA’s title, Focus Four, is basically a warning in and of itself: These are the four hazards to which OSHA officials pay the most attention. It is not surprising, then, that the Focus Four are always among OSHA’s most cited standards.

The Focus Four Are:

  • Falls
  • Struck by object
  • Electrocutions
  • Caught in/between

The Focus Four with statistics from construction in 2013 are:

  • 1) Falls: 302 out of 828 total construction deaths (36.5 percent)
  • 2) Struck by object: 84 deaths (10.1 percent)
  • 3) Electrocutions: 71 deaths (8.6 percent)
  • 4) Caught in/between: 21 deaths (2.5 percent)

Now do you see why these hazards are titled the Focus Four?

Falls from height are the primary cause of fatalities in the roofing industry. Between 2012-14, there were more than 1,300 roofer fatalities from falls. Year after year, falls are No. 1 on OSHA’s Focus Four. In addition, fall-related topics are heavily represented in the top 10 most-cited OSHA standards (see list below).

Struck-by incidents, while not as common as falls, can also cause death and serious injuries in the roofing trade. Employees throwing scrap material off a roof without a chute or in a controlled landing area combined with employees not wearing proper personal-protective equipment can lead to serious struck-by incidents.

Electricity also poses a safety risk for roofers. It can kill in three ways: falls, burns and electrocution. Working too closely to electrical lines, using aluminum ladders and working with metallic conductive gutters, as well as using conductive roofing and flashing materials, can lead to death from electrocution. In addition, a lack of ground-fault protections while using damaged, non-construction-rated electrical cords with missing ground plugs can lead to fatalities.

Caught-in/crushed-by incidents are less prevalent in the roofing industry. However, there have been occasions where employees are caught in ladders and killed. It happens.

The Focus Four are, of course, not the only hazards. Particularly in hot weather, heat syncope, heat exhaustion and heat stroke are all prevalent in the roofing industry.

Construction inspections account for 60 percent of OSHA’s total inspections. In 2009, preliminary data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Washington, suggest there were 816 fatal on-the-job injuries involving construction workers—more than in any other single industry sector and nearly one out of every five work-related deaths in the U.S. In the same year, private-industry construction workers had a fatal occupational injury rate nearly three times that of all workers in the U.S.: 9.7 per 100,000 full-time equivalent construction workers versus 3.3 per 100,000 for all workers. (Learn more from the Construction Focus Four: Outreach Training Packet.) Therefore, it seems to me it’s a good idea to follow OSHA’s fall-protection standards—as well as its other standards. It just might save lives.


  • Fall Protection, Construction (29 CFR 1926.501)
  • Hazard Communication Standard, General Industry (29 CFR 1910.1200)
  • Scaffolding, General Requirements, Construction (29 CFR 1926.451)
  • Respiratory Protection, General Industry (29 CFR 1910.134)
  • Powered Industrial Trucks, General Industry (29 CFR 1910.178)
  • Control of Hazardous Energy(lockout/tagout), General Industry (29 CFR 1910.147)
  • Ladders, Construction (29 CFR 1926.1053)
  • Electrical, Wiring Methods, Components and Equipment, General Industry (29 CFR 1910.305)
  • Machinery and Machine Guarding, General Industry (29 CFR 1910.212)
  • Electrical Systems Design, General Requirements, General Industry (29 CFR 1910.303)

GAF Partners with SLATOR to Make Working on Steep Roofs Safer

GAF announced an alliance with SLATOR, creator of a new safety device helping contractors to make the dangerous business of working on steep roofs safer and more efficient.

Falls are the leading cause of death for construction workers, with 39 percent from roof falls, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Fall protection is also the most frequently cited OSHA violation, which carries hefty fines. SLATOR helps to avoid these situations by offering an easier, faster and safer way to make roof repairs on asphalt or slate shingle roofs. The sturdy metal bracket bolts to a roof to serve as a secure ladder clamp and harness anchor point.

The red SLATOR Roof Bracket is ANSI certified and OSHA compliant, with the ability to hold up to 5,000 pounds—roughly the weight of a rhino or small truck—from a rooftop. The blue SLATOR-Mini is a smaller ladder clamp without the anchor feature.

“We invented the SLATOR to help us work better, work safer and work faster on steep slate and asphalt shingle roofs,” says SLATOR inventor Ronny Roseveare, a 20-year roofer and remodeler. “We’re very excited about our alliance with GAF and look forward to offering enhanced fall protection to GAF Master Elite, Master Select, Certified and Master Contractors across the country.”

NRCA Releases Updated Toolbox Talks

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) has updated its NRCA Toolbox Talks publication to include the latest developments in safety training for roofing workers.

NRCA Toolbox Talks is designed specifically to enable foremen and trainers to review important safety lessons with their crews on a weekly basis. Each lesson is structured for various presentation styles and includes safety-training tips and key points to stimulate questions and discussion.

Hands-on training conducted regularly is the most effective way for roofing contractors to reinforce worker safety, comply with OSHA regulations and improve profitability.

Topics in NRCA Toolbox Talks include equipment safety, fall protection, OSHA requirements, hazard communication, hot asphalt safety and personal protective equipment.

The Aftermath of Construction Accidents

According to a 2014 Washington, D.C.-based Bureau of Labor Statistics press release, the construction industry has the highest fatality rate of any industry in the U.S. In 2013, the construction industry saw a total of 796 fatal injuries with more than 100 more deaths than the next highest industry fatality rate in transportation and warehousing. Within the construction industry, general construction laborers are the most at risk for injury or death on the job.

These statistics are frightening, and the reality is that most construction accidents could have been prevented. Washington-based OSHA standards are in place to prevent most construction workplace accidents. Many of the primary causes of injury, including the fatal four—falls, struck by an object, electrocution, and caught-in/between—can be prevented if proper care is taken and OSHA standards are followed.


When someone is injured or killed at a construction site, the ramifications can extend to family members and last a lifetime. Work-related injuries can cause loss of income, chronic pain, extensive medical expenses, a decrease in quality of life and psychological suffering. Legal advice and workers’ compensation insurance can remedy the loss of income and medical expenses, but a worker can never get back his health and/or quality of life after a serious job-site injury.

Liability becomes an important legal issue after a construction-site injury and is generally determined by the following factors:

  • The responsibility of the general contractor to provide a safe work environment.
  • The responsibility of other subcontractors to act in a responsible and safe manner.
  • The responsibility of the worker to act in a responsible and safe manner.

Other parties that may be held liable in workplace injury claims include the employer, architects, engineers and equipment manufacturers. In some cases, fault lies with more than one party and navigating a construction injury claim without the aid of a knowledgeable attorney is nearly impossible.

A personal injury or workers’ compensation attorney working on a construction case generally does the majority of casework before a case is ever presented in court. The attorney must carefully investigate every detail of the accident independent of the insurance investigation and the injured worker’s employer investigation. The evidence presented in construction-accident cases often determines a worker’s or worker’s family’s ability to be made whole for medical expenses, lost income, legal fees and more.

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