Shingles Available in Four New Colors

Two years after introducing TruDefinition Duration FLEX shingles, Owens Corning is adding four new vibrant, dimensional colors to the Duration FLEX shingle portfolio. Black Sable, Sand Dune, Storm Cloud and Summer Harvest are the newest shingle colors to join the Duration FLEX  family, fusing the power of color with high-performance. The new color offerings expand upon the existing classic palette of rich, sophisticated hues.

As spring home improvement season gets underway, the expanded shingle color options are inspiring new ideas for leveraging the roof to boost exterior curb appeal. The Duration FLEX line is designed to deliver beautiful performance and protection season after season, even in extreme weather conditions. Pairing style with strength, the new shingles stand up to harsh environmental conditions while delivering everyday protection. 

Featuring a rubberizing effect that delivers greater flexibility than conventional shingles,  Duration FLEX is manufactured to support enhanced durability and performance in all environmental conditions. The SBS polymer modified shingle is equipped with patented SureNail Technology to deliver premium performance and added confidence as it gives a 42 percent better nail-pull resistance against the wind versus standard shingles. Built-in flexibility helps resist cracking and tearing, in all-weather installation conditions while offering over 10 percent stronger tear strength than traditional shingles. The rubber-like flexibility allows  Duration FLEX  shingles to withstand expansion and contraction stresses and helps minimize loss of granules which help to protect the shingle against UV.

While performance is front and center with the Duration FLEX line, homeowners are also turning to the roof as an opportunity to enhance their home’s exterior curb appeal and express personal style. 

The TruDefinition Duration FLEX shingles support performance in extreme weather while bringing beautiful new color options to the rooftop. Owens Corning has curated a selection of online shingle pairings to provide color inspiration and help homeowners express their personal style on their home’s exterior.  

For more information, visit https://www.owenscorning.com/en-us/roofing/shingles.

Mission-Critical Roofs Protect Some of the World’s Most Interesting Buildings

New Acropolis Museum in Athens houses priceless art and historical artifacts. The building’s highly transparent glass façades are designed to showcase its exhibits and provide panoramic views of the historic surroundings. Photos: Owens Corning

A museum built atop ancient artifacts reflecting human activities from the Greek Bronze Age to Roman and Byzantine Greece. A crescent-shaped design center sheathed in a copper/aluminum alloy. A paper mill that is home to the world’s largest newsprint press, producing enough paper to cover 120 km of three-lane motorway every hour.

Each of these buildings presented a common dilemma for designers and contractors: How best to protect what’s inside? The high-value products and processes these structures house span centuries — from ancient scrolls to high-speed presses. But despite the buildings’ varied purposes, one material protects them all — cellular glass insulation.

Long trusted in Europe for its endurance and performance, cellular glass insulation is valued for a spectrum of performance criteria. These attributes include outstanding compressive strength, a moisture-impervious profile, redundancy, dimensional stability, fire resistance and sustainable composition. Collectively, these qualities provide a roofing insulation designed to weather the stressors of time, toil and the elements.

This detail shows the roof system installed on the concrete deck on Level 2 of the New Acropolis Museum including (1) the concrete deck; (2) bitumen-based primer; (3) FOAMGLAS slabs, fully adhered; (4) two layer waterproofing membranes, with polyester reinforcement; (5) adjustable BUZON pedestals; (6) marble slabs, roof finish.

Below, we take a virtual journey “across the pond” to understand how cellular glass insulation is protecting timeless treasures with modern-day processes. Returning to America, we consider how this material has found a home in the New World and consider how cellular glass can help ever-industrious America protect mission-critical buildings.

New Acropolis Museum, Athens

Standing as a model of “living history,” the New Acropolis Museum’s collections allow visitors to experientially move through human civilization from prehistoric times through late antiquity. A window onto an archeological excavation area below the floor connects modern-day discovery with ancient artifacts preserved beneath the museum.

This detail shows the roof system installed on the metal deck on Level 1 of the New Acropolis Museum including (1) the metal deck; (2) bitumen-based primer; (3) FOAMGLAS tapered slabs in hot bitumen; (4) hot bitumen; (5) two layer waterproofing membranes (first layer with polyester reinforcement); (6) FOAMGLAS fixing plates; (7) screws; (8) rubber sealing ring; (9) support; (10) non-transparent glass.

Comprised of a base, middle and top level, the museum takes the form of a cube. Viewed from the Acropolis perched above, the flat FOAMGLAS roof complements the geometric ethos of the design. Above a base level that allows viewers to watch excavation activity in real time, the middle level is a double-height trapezoidal plate accommodating galleries from the Archaic period to the Roman era. The top level is made up of a rectangular Parthenon Gallery. The gallery features a glass enclosure allowing natural light to show off sculpture while providing breathtaking views.

The cellular glass insulation in the main roofing system is placed atop a metal roof deck that includes a bitumen-based primer under FOAMGLAS tapered and fully adhered insulation. The insulation is placed below a layer of hot bitumen and two layers of waterproofing membrane which are reinforced with polyester material and covered with an embedded protection course. This surface is connected with a FOAMGLAS serrated plate, screw and rubber air- and water-sealing gasket ring to a support structure underneath non-transparent glass.

Viewed from the Acropolis perched above, the roof of the New Acropolis Museum
complements the geometric ethos of the design.

Marc Clynhens, Technical Director for FOAMGLAS and based in Belgium, was on the jobsite during the installation of the roof system. Installed during Greece’s scorching summer weather, the material was easy for workers to handle on the jobsite, according to Clynhens. “FOAMGLAS is a very rigid material, but it is easy to cut into shapes to complement a building’s unique design,” he says. For example, a dome sitting atop the roof of the Qatar National Museum required cellular glass insulation to be precisely cut to create the specific domed shape.

Of course, every project has a few unexpected challenges. While lightning protection was being installed in the New Acropolis Museum, drilling through the cellular glass insulation punctured the waterproofing layer and was sealed with silicone instead of the sealant specified by the roof membrane manufacturer. Clynhens notes this turned into a “teachable moment” for the crews. Quick troubleshooting and a revised detail resolved this issue. A conduit was installed to attach the lightning protection system.

A few other “aha” moments that had to be managed on the jobsite were slight deviations between drawings and the actual roof measurements. This is a quite common occurrence on jobsites, and as cellular glass insulation is easy to cut, adjustments can be easily made to address these deviations. The tapered roof system is well known in Europe. The FOAMGLAS team often recommends tapered insulation to reduce the weight of the roof and ensure drainage, just as we would in the United States. Since the substructure was flat, the team had to slope the insulation to meet the design of the museum’s top glass layer.

This detail shows another view of the FOAMGLAS serrated plate assembly.

Even low-profile materials support the assembly’s performance. Bitumen — a sealing and adhesive membrane material of choice since the 1960s — attaches the cellular glass insulation to the rest of the membrane. This material also complements reuse of FOAMGLAS in the future – for example, if building codes require modification to materials or if waterproofing membranes are replaced. Clynhens notes it is relatively easy to peel off the membrane from the FOAMGLAS, pour a new level of bitumen, and reattach the original insulation to the new membrane.

Europe has long been a leader in sustainable building, and the 60 percent recycled glass in FOAMGLAS supports this performance quality. Processes on the jobsite also support sustainability, with the goal always being to generate as little waste as possible. For example, Clynhens notes that FOAMGLAS production waste materials that cannot be recycled in the production process are remixed into clay for bricks.

Firstsite Design Centre, Colchester, United Kingdom

Located in Essex, about 90 minutes from London, the Firstsite Design Centre presents experiential contemporary art while paying homage to the rich artistic legacy of the local landscape. While studio and gallery spaces host workshops, lectures and events, the centerpiece of Firstsite is the Berryfield mosaic, an ancient artifact discovered in 1923 on the site where Firstsite stands. The mosaic — installed in a glass case built into the floor — was originally part of a Roman townhouse, circa 200 A.D. To protect the ancient artifacts underneath, Firstsite was erected on a concrete raft foundation, requiring no deep excavation.

Firstsite Design Centre showcases contemporary art as well as the Berryfield mosaic, an ancient artifact discovered on the site where the building stands.

While much of the site’s intrigue is underground, above-ground design elements — especially the roof — are pretty remarkable. FOAMGLAS insulation was laid onto beads of a cold adhesive on the metal roof deck with no through fasteners. Square plates for mechanical attachment were pushed into the insulation and a torch-on membrane was applied. Additional metal grips were screwed through the bitumen membrane into the metal plates below, providing the structure onto which the standing seams of Tecu Gold Sheets (a copper and aluminum alloy) could be folded and mechanically attached.

While cellular glass insulation provides a completely waterproof roof, it is also part of the intriguing façade. A FOAMGLAS slab of 100 mm was applied and adhered to the center’s plywood substrate, enhancing the façade’s resilience, while the Tecu Gold Sheets were seamed and fixed into position help achieve the aura of a golden glow.

Stora Enso’s Langerbrugge Mill, Belgium

One of Europe’s largest paper mills, Stora Enso’s Langerbrugge Mill in northwestern Belgium produces 540,000 tons of recycled paper annually and houses the world’s largest newsprint machine. The company is also a leader in renewable materials that replace fossil-based resources. In 2019, the company announced a pilot facility for enabling the production of bio-based plastics and, in 2020, the facility found a way to recycle used paper cups that will cut the carbon footprint of disposable paper cups by a compelling 50 percent.  

The roof on the Langerbrugge Mill in Belgium protects the world’s largest newsprint machine while also supporting heavy mechanical and electrical equipment on the rooftop.

The FOAMGLAS cellular glass roof topping the 22,000 m2 (236,806 ft2) area of flat roofs at the Langerbrugge Mill aligns with the company’s investment in ecologically responsible activities. From a sustainability perspective, cellular glass insulation is manufactured using more than 60 percent recycled glass. Totally inorganic, FOAMGLAS contains no ozone-depleting propellants, flame retardants or binders, and is free of volatile organic compounds. Sand is the primary ingredient used in the manufacture of cellular glass, along with some other ingredients, including limestone and soda ash.

Compressive strength is another consideration in the industrial environment. The Langerbrugge Mill’s rooftop supports mechanical and electrical equipment that demand extreme loadbearing capacity. The lowest compressive strength of this type of cellular glass insulation is in the range of 50-70 PSI and can go much higher. High compressive strength complements its dimensional stability. The pure glass composition provides a low coefficient of thermal movement, comparable to concrete and steel. Such stability means there is no warping, dishing or shrinking of the insulation, even as the temperature fluctuates over seasons. Cellular glass provides a stable foundation for the roofing membrane, minimizing the stress arising from constant stretching that can allow a membrane to deteriorate over time.

Industrial operations present considerations when it comes to fire and moisture resistance as well. Noncombustible, cellular glass does not burn, spread fire, produce flames or present a fire risk in the building structure. Printing and biomass processes create a high vapor pressure, which cellular glass is well-suited to manage, given its ability to manage moisture.

The “layered” roof assembly consists of a prefab concrete slab, concrete topping, adhesive primer, cellular glass insulation fully adhered and sealed at the joints with hot bitumen, and two layers of bituminous waterproofing to complete the roof.

Stateside Proven Performance

In Europe, where space is limited and humans have been building for millennia, cellular glass insulation has earned a reputation for its endurance. But its qualities are not without precedent in North America. Cellular glass’s performance attributes captured attention in the mid-20th century, but fell out of the spotlight as less-expensive foam products were introduced. However, when considering the longevity of FOAMGLAS insulation across a building’s life and its ability to maintain performance in harsh conditions, FOAMGLAS could potentially be a more economical choice than less-expensive insulating options.

The Jardine Water Purification Plant next to Chicago’s Navy Pier processes almost a billion gallons of water each day.

Still, for mission-critical projects, cellular glass insulation has been a trusted material for projects ranging from the roof of a Chicago water treatment plant processing one billion gallons of water daily, to the rotunda in New York City’s iconic Guggenheim Museum.

The longevity of cellular glass was exposed, literally, during a re-roofing of the Jardine Water Purification Plant next to Chicago’s Navy Pier. Each day, the plant processes almost a billion gallons of water (that’s about a million gallons per minute) from Lake Michigan. Considered critical to the city’s infrastructure, it falls under the protection of the Department of Homeland Security.

The building’s roof was designed with cellular glass insulation to withstand the harsh conditions of Chicago’s climate, as well as the corrosive conditions that accompany water treatment processes. The insulation’s effectiveness in meeting performance expectations came to light in 2012 when the plant’s original concrete and coal-tar pitch roof, spanning 10.3 acres, began to show signs of moisture infiltration after nearly a half-century in use. As the roof was disassembled, the cellular glass insulation was found to be completely intact, installed in place and performing without flaw — even in extreme conditions for nearly 50 years.

When Performance is Paramount

In Europe, America and around the globe, designers have many choices today when it comes to roofing options. Quality is non-negotiable and performance levels are high in today’s roofing materials. But when a project is mission-critical, and performance is paramount — such as buildings that house timeless treasures or cover one-of-a-kind equipment or processes — cellular glass insulation provides a level of performance that stands up to the tests of time, climate and designers’ trust.  

About the author: Tiffany Coppock, AIA, NCARB, CSI, CDT, LEED AP, ASTM, RCI, EDAC is the Commercial Building Systems Specialist at Owens Corning where she provides leadership in building science, system development, testing, and documentation.

Roofing: The Industry’s Voice

Episode 1: “Postcards From Europe: Mission Critical Roofs”
Chris King, editor of Roofing, talks to Tiffany Coppock and Marc Clynhens about the innovative roof assemblies on mission-critical structures including the New Acropolis Museum in Athens, Greece; the Firstsite Design Centre in Essex, England; and the Stora Enso Langerbrugge Mill in Belgium. Listen here or down below.


Extruded Polystyrene Insulation Reduces Embodied Carbon

On January 1, 2021, Canada and several U.S. states enacted stringent new environmental regulations to address concerns about high-Global Warming Potential (GWP) hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) blowing agents. With this change, sustainability and smart material performance are coming together in FOAMULAR NGX (Next Generation Extruded) insulation. Developed by Owens Corning, the latest innovation in extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulation contains a proprietary blowing agent that completely eliminates HFC 134a. FOAMULAR NGX delivers a 90 percent reduction in blowing agent GWP compared to legacy FOAMULAR insulation and is optimized to demonstrate a greater than 80 percent reduction in embodied carbon. 

Owens Corning’s efforts to achieve a higher level of sustainability in rigid foam building materials predate this latest regulatory moment. More than six years of research and development and the evaluation of over 100 blowing agent formulations support the introduction of FOAMULAR NGX. In developing the new insulation, research and development teams sought to reduce the blowing agent’s GWP without sacrificing the material’s many performance attributes including high R-value per inch, a wide range of compressive strengths, superior moisture resistance and durability. 

Manufactured with patented Hydrovac technology, FOAMULAR NGX is highly resistant to moisture and retains its high R-value even after prolonged exposure to moisture and freeze/thaw cycling. The product is available in many compressive strengths, up to 100 psi, and is well suited to applications across the enclosure, from load-bearing vegetative roofs and foundational supports to wall assemblies. And as a further measure of confidence, FOAMULAR NGX offers a limited lifetime warranty guaranteeing a minimum 90 percent of R-value for the life of the product.

The sustainability profile of FOAMULAR NGX is validated by a third-party verified Environmental Product Declaration and Optimization Report. A greater than 80 percent reduction in GWP qualifies FOAMULAR NGX as 1.5 products towards LEED 4.1 points for Options 1 and 2 under the Materials and Resources: Environmental Product Declaration (EPD). As a widely recognized standard of sustainability, the EPD can provide even more incentives to integrate sustainability features into the commercial enclosure, such as vegetative roof assemblies or below-grade use. Specifying and installing FOAMULAR NGX can help builders achieve U.S. green building program certifications including LEED, the Environmental Protection Agency’s ENERGY STAR, and the National Home Builders’ National Green Building Standard ICC 700-2008. 

The manufacturing process and material content of FOAMULAR NGX also support sustainability. Manufactured with 100 percent wind electricity, the product is GREENGUARD Gold certified, reusable, and certified by Scientific Certification Systems to contain a minimum of 20 percent recycled polystyrene. 

The potential for this innovation to reduce environmental pressure on the planet can be more fully appreciated when viewed through the lens of more commonly discussed energy metrics. 
Owens Corning’s sustainability team used an environmental calculator to evaluate how switching from a competitive XPS product could reduce GWP. The reduction potential is dramatic. For every 1 million board feet (BFT) of FOAMULAR NGX consumed versus the leading competitor, CO2 levels are reduced by 6,966 metric tons on average. To put the savings in context, that’s like taking 1,500 cars off the road for a year. (EPA. March 2020. Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator. https://www.epa.gov/energy/greenhouse-gas-equivalencies-calculator.) 

FOAMULAR NGX is Underwriters Laboratory (UL) Listed and Factory Mutual (FM) approved. Retaining its same, iconic Pink color, FOAMULAR NGX is now available to order in all U.S. states and Canada.

More information and an interactive map that tracks state-by-state environmental regulations to lower the GWP levels of blowing agents is available on the Owens Corning FOAMULAR® NGX™ resource page.

For more information, visit www.owenscorning.com.

How to Achieve a Balanced Approach to Ventilation

Intake vents at the eaves allow cool, dry outside air to be drawn up into the attic, while exhaust vents at the ridge direct moist, warm air out of the attic and back into the environment. A balanced ventilation system, with equal distribution of intake and exhaust vents, helps optimize air exchange and prevents problems including ice dams. Photos: Owens Corning Roofing

What do blisters, bumps, and mole runs on a home’s roof have in common? Beyond detracting from exterior curb appeal, they may indicate a ventilation problem contributing to a range of comfort and performance concerns. Even the highest-performing roofing system will not deliver its full performance if a home’s roof is not properly ventilated.

Below, we look at how a balanced approach to ventilation supports a home’s structural performance and its occupants’ comfort. Balanced ventilation can prevent problems ranging from ice dams on a home’s exterior during winter to uncomfortable indoor humidity in the summer.

Ventilation supports the natural flow of air into and out of the home’s attic space. The forces of wind pressure and thermal effect work together to ventilate the attic. Intake vents allow cool, dry outside air to be drawn up into the attic, while exhaust system components direct the flow of excess heat out of the attic and back into the environment. A balanced ventilation system has an equal distribution of intake and exhaust vents (50 percent near the eave and 50 percent near the ridge), helping optimize air exchange and supporting effective thermal and moisture management.

Balance between intake and exhaust is key. Inadequate intake vents can cause negative air pressure air blowing across the roof surface to force higher pressure air to move outside the attic. As the displaced attic air needs to be replaced, insufficient intake ventilation will cause air to be drawn in through exhaust vents, potentially drawing in moisture/precipitation from outside.

Managing both the roof’s thermal and moisture profiles demands a balanced approach to ventilation. This balanced approach is comprised of three components: ample insulation, balanced ventilation, and controlled airflow through proper sealing and insulation — the ABCs of ventilation.

Ample Amount

The International Building Code (IBC) and International Residential Code (IRC) require a minimum ventilation ratio of 1:150 (1 square foot of vent area for each 150 square feet of attic/roof area). If certain requirements are met, such as balanced ventilation, the ratio can be reduced to 1:300. Always consult local codes for specific requirements. Owens Corning recommends a 1:150 ratio combined with balanced intake and exhaust ventilation. The free online Owens Corning ventilation calculator (www.owenscorning.com/en-us/roofing/components/vent-calculator) is a practical tool for informing insulation levels. By entering square footage or the metrics of the space, users can determine how much ventilation is required for the space.

Properly installed insulation supports a balanced approach to ventilation in the attic space.

Ample ventilation is about much more than code compliance. Properly installed, vents can help manage moisture that leads to performance problems. For example, in cold climates, high moisture levels inside (from showers, cooking, fish tanks, etc.) combined with cold outside air can cause frost to form on the interior of the roof deck, posing a risk for dry rot to occur. By keeping the roof deck temperature closer to the outdoor temperature, ventilation may also reduce ice dam occurrences, which can lead to water leaks on steep-sloped roofs. And in hot climates or during summertime, ventilation helps exchange hot attic air with cooler outdoor air, contributing to a more comfortable home.

Balanced Ventilation

Good ventilation requires a 50/50 balance between intake and exhaust vents to keep conditioned air inside the house and out of the attic. As exhaust vents (typically ridge vents or off-ridge vents) pull air out of the attic, the intake vents replace this “lost” air, drawing in air from outside. Location of the vents is also very important. Intake vents should be installed in soffits or lower on the roof slope near the eaves. An imbalance between intake and exhaust vents can create negative pressure in the attic, drawing in air from the conditioned part of the home via the ceiling, wall cracks, lighting fixtures and/or joints in the framing. This situation can result in a less comfortable indoor environment, lost energy, and higher heating/cooling bills. In no case should the amount of exhaust ventilation exceed the amount of intake ventilation.

Controlled Airflow

The amount of moisture generated by human activities inside the average home is significant. A common estimate is that a family of four’s combined activities will contribute 1.3 gallons of water per day to the home’s indoor environment.

When trapped in various elements of the roofing system, liquid or vapor moisture contributes to problems ranging from structural damage to mildew and indoor odors. Similar to temperature differences, moisture in the air can lead to deck deflection as the wood in the roof deck deteriorates and warps. Too much humidity may also have a corrosive effect on metal components in the attic, including ductwork and HVAC equipment. Inside the home, high relative humidity may help facilitate the formation of mildew or peeling paint.

External Factors To Consider

In addition to proper balance of intake and exhaust vents, adequate insulation, and controlled moisture, other less-controllable factors may also influence ventilation rates — including variations in wind speed, wind direction, and surrounding topography. While higher wind speeds tend to increase ventilation rates, ventilation rates at a given wind speed may vary by a factor of 10. Ventilation rates are highest when the airflow/wind direction is perpendicular to intake openings. Ventilation rates decrease as wind direction becomes more parallel to the opening. Even topography can influence ventilation by influencing the speed and direction of wind. For example, the number and location of nearby structures, a home’s height, trees/vegetation, and variance in surrounding elevations can all affect the flow of wind. Predicting the impact of these factors requires sophisticated building science technologies, which can serve as useful tools for comparative analysis and help influence product innovations.

Modeling and Building Science

Owens Corning uses advanced technologies to inform ventilation approaches for mitigating thermal and moisture challenges. For example, computer simulations were used to evaluate how different ventilation strategies would impact attic temperature. Using AtticSim software, team members simulated temperatures in a Tampa, Florida attic during one week in July. The modeled attic had a gabled construction, measured 50 feet by 27 feet with a 4:12 roof slope, and had R-30 insulation installed in the ceiling. The analysis evaluated two ventilation schemes: one with balanced ventilation (soffit-to-ridge) and one with unbalanced ventilation (soffit-to-soffit only). As a “control” measure, a sealed attic (attic without vents at the soffit and the ridge) was also evaluated. Analysis reveals that temperatures in a sealed attic without any ventilation exceeded 140 degrees Fahrenheit. The balanced ventilation between intake and exhaust was effective in reducing temperature in the attic when compared to the soffit-only approach. The balanced ventilation reflected a temperature difference of more than 30 degrees when compared to the soffit ventilation approach.

What practical application can we make of this building science research to inform a ventilation strategy? This analysis shows the benefits of a balanced approach. When the roof’s intake and exhaust system is balanced, the benefit of wind pressure and buoyancy-induced ventilation work together to increase air exchange and lower attic temperatures. The unbalanced approach (soffit-to-soffit only) is more variable and does not lead to the same air temperature reduction. The unbalanced, soffit-only ventilation is less effective and appears to be impacted by changes in wind speed and direction.

At the end of the day, it doesn’t take a building scientist to understand the benefits of getting the ventilation right with a balanced approach. Balanced ventilation keeps homeowners more comfortable, contributes to the roof system’s proper functioning, and helps a contractor walk away with confidence, protecting both the businesses’ reputation and the bottom line.

About the authors: Lucas Console is Product Manager – Owens Corning Roofing and Greg Keeler is Technical Service Leader  Owens Corning Roofing. For more information, visit www.owenscorning.com/roofing.

Owens Corning Announces 2021 Shingle Color of the Year: Aged Copper

Owens Corning announced Aged Copper as the 2021 Shingle Color of the Year. It is the fifth shingle in the Owens Corning TruDefinition Duration Designer Colors Collection to receive this designation.

In selecting Aged Copper as the 2021 Shingle Color of the Year, the Owens Corning team drew on the insights of exterior designers and architects as well as reflected on local and global issues that affect homeowners. Aged Copper blends granules infused with hues of orange, sage and brown to achieve a warm, welcoming effect. It delivers a balanced energy between the neutrality of minimalist shades and the intensity of stronger hues.

“2020 has forced us to find sanctuary in our homes, but it has also allowed us to rediscover the wonder and beauty of nature, because it’s a safe space,” said Sue Burkett, strategic marketing manager at Owens Corning. “As we look toward 2021, we see homeowners creating spaces that serve as a retreat from the cares of the world.”

“We were inspired to draw on the calming influences of nature to evoke a sense of natural beauty and serenity,” Burkett added. “This serene inspiration can find its way on to the roof as an ideal element for tying together an exterior color palette integrating a soothing spectrum of nature-inspired colors.” 

Like all colors in the Shingle Color of the Year series, Aged Copper coordinates with a broad palette of exterior colors and surfaces including brick, stone, and natural wood. The shingle’s versatility is highlighted with new inspiration boards added to the existing style boards on the Owens Corning website. Additional “design and inspire” tools, including the proprietary Design EyeQ® visualization software, and exterior design advice provided by designer Chad Esslinger, help give homeowners confidence to choose the right shingle for their home and personality

The Shingle Color of the Year initiative recognizes and engages women influencers in roofing decisions. In 2020, Owens Corning earned the Women’s Choice Award® as America’s most recommended roofing products for the third consecutive year.

Beyond aesthetics, shingle performance is critical when it comes to the home’s roof. As weather intensifies across the United States, Aged Copper, on the Duration Series platform, delivers the performance technology that stands up to the elements, notes the manufacturer. The Owens Corning TruDefinition Duration Series line is equipped with patented SureNail Technology and Triple Layer Protection in the nailing zone, providing up to 2.5 times better nail pull-through resistance, up to nine times better blow-through resistance, and up to two times better delamination resistance compared to competitive products.

For more information, please visit www.owenscorning.com.

The Calcaire House Meets Strict Energy Codes — and Does it in Style

The residential compound is made up of five interconnected buildings and features both gabled standing seam metal roofs and low-slope TPO roofs. Photos: S-5!

The Calcaire House is a 15,000-square-foot modern Colorado single-family residential compound consisting of five interconnected buildings. Floor-to-ceiling glass connects the interior space to the exterior landscape, offering spectacular views of the Boulder Flatirons. A combination of exposed timber, stone and steel structural design elements, and exposed custom roof trusses complement the gabled standing seam metal roof.

Boulder Roofing Company and The Solar Revolution were charged with installing a metal roof and solar array with more than 60 kilowatts of solar dispersed over multiple rooftops. Boulder Roofing installed both standing seam metal and TPO roof systems on the project. Crews installed approximately 12,000 square feet of 14-inch, 24-gauge panels from Drexel Metals in traditional black over Titanium PSU30 high-temp peel and stick underlayment.

They also installed 3,000 square feet of 60-mil Versico TPO over low-slope areas. The TPO was adhered to quarter-inch DensDeck Prime over tapered EPS insulation. Boulder Roofing fabricated and installed custom flashings and coping, and also installed an S-5! snow-guard system incorporating the S-5! ColorGard bars, S-5-S Mini clamps, SnoClip IIs, and VersaClips.

The Energy Challenge

The city of Boulder has strict energy codes in place and requires all new construction to meet a certain level of efficiency. The requirements are based on the square footage of the home and are more stringent on larger homes — the larger the home, the more efficient it needs to be. The goal is to have a net-zero home, not taking energy from the grid, and the only way for a larger home to achieve this is with solar. A modest home or small addition might only require about 2 kilowatts. A large home might require 20-30 kilowatts.

The most optimal rooftops for solar were also the most visually prominent, and the homeowner was concerned about aesthetics. These concerns were alleviated after seeing a small-scale mock-up of the S-5! PVKIT 2.0 solution combined with an all-black solar module.

In addition, the area is considered a high-wind area and would require a study to account for windspeeds, as the solar installers could only rely on the roof itself and its attachment to the wood sheeting when attaching solar panels using S-5!’s zero-penetration system.

Another difficulty was finding a viable path to route the energy created by the solar panels back to the point of connection with the home’s distribution. The Solar Revolution worked with the builder and the architect, and analyzed photos and design plans to find ways to conceal the conduits. They ultimately found a viable path that was aesthetically pleasing, code compliant and cost-effective.

The Solution

The Solar Revolution installers utilized S-5!’s PVKIT 2.0 to build the solar array. The installation team started at ground level prepping S-5! PVKIT MidGrabs and EdgeGrabs. Another team member prepared the solar modules by installing the power optimizers and managing the various wires. By completing this work on the ground, the roof crew could focus on setting modules, and it minimized their time in harnesses on a steep metal roof. The solar installers prefer to install modules starting with the bottom row and working up. Extra care is taken when aligning the first row. This precision allows for subsequent rows to drop into place on the S-5! PVKIT MidGrabs.

The Solar Revolution installed a solar array that provides more than 60 kilowatts of power.

“The Solar Revolution has been utilizing the S-5! PVKIT 2.0 solution since it first hit the market,” says Doug Claxton, CEO of The Solar Revolution. “Hands down, it is the best solar mounting solution for metal roofing of any description. At first, we were a little worried about wire management and installing in landscape, but those worries were overcome with our first installation. It’s a piece of cake.”

Long-Term Outlook

With the S-5! PVKIT 2.0, the Calcaire House was able to meet the city code requirements for solar and establish itself as an energy-efficient, net-zero home. Because the PVKIT comes in black, it matched the roof nicely, pulling together all of the design elements in an aesthetically pleasing, cost-effective manner — saving the customer time and money on installation and materials.

TEAM

Architect: Surround Architecture, Boulder, Colorado, www.surroundarchitecture.com

General Contractor: Harrington Stanko Construction, Niwot, Colorado, www.harringtonstanko.com

Engineer: Anthem Structural Engineers, Boulder, Colorado, www.anthemstructural.com

Roofing Contractor: Boulder Roofing Company, Boulder, Colorado, www.boulderroof.com

Solar Installer: The Solar Revolution, Boulder, Colorado, www.thesolarrevolution.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: 175SS 14-inch, 24 gauge panels, Drexel Metals, www.drexmet.com

Underlayment: Titanium PSU30, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

TPO Roof: 60-mil Grey TPO, Versico, www.versico.com

Cover Board: DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Solar Attachment: S-5! PVKIT 2.0 in black with S-5-S Mini Clamps, www.S-5.com

Snow Guards: S-5! ColorGard, S-5-S Mini Clamps, SnowClipIIs and VersaClips

XAP 360 and Owens Corning Introduce Touchless Roofing Inspection Platform to U.S. Contractors

XAP 360 is collaborating with Owens Corning to offer Owens Corning Roofing Contractor (OCCN) members an advanced inspection and reporting tool, OC ProScan. The new business service is designed to deliver transparent and accurate roof inspection experience for homeowners, helping claim payouts occur rapidly while also educating and protecting the contractor’s customer base.

XAP 360 and Owens Corning are working together to provide roofing contractors with a drone-based roofing inspections platform that offers a fully autonomous, touchless technology providing objective third party professional reporting.

“Owens Corning is proud to team up with innovative business services like XAP 360 whose innovative platform will enable Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network members to differentiate themselves in this virtual selling environment and take their business to the next level,” said Jon Gardner, Contractor Training Leader, Owens Corning.

“With XAP 360 powered by Kespry, roofing professionals and property owners can finally sit at the same table physically or virtually, and communicate honestly and openly,” said Phil Pratt, partner, XAP 360. “We can now bridge the existing uncertainty gap with transparency as XAP 360 is guided by sophisticated technological innovations in aerial intelligence from Kespry. We’ve pushed the roofing industry out of the shadows and into the information age, giving our contractors tools to allow them to seamlessly work in today’s  new business environment.”

For more information about Owens Corning, visit www.owenscorning.com

For more information about XAP 360, visit http://xap360.com/ocp

Creating a Homelike Environment at Flatrock Manor

Flatrock Manor’s main roof features a mechanically fastened TPO system from Mule-Hide Products Co. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co.

Flatrock Manor owner and chief executive officer Nicholas Burnett saw tremendous potential in the shuttered building. It was the right size. It was designed for providing health care, serving first as a hospital and later as a hospice. It was situated on 10 acres of scenic property complete with a nature trail, a gazebo and a pond that is home to swans, geese, ducks and painted turtles. Its exterior included beautiful Mid-century modern details.

Burnett had long been seeking an opportunity in Goodrich, Michigan, to open a new location for Flatrock Manor, a group of foster care centers in Mid-Michigan for adults with special developmental and behavioral needs. The empty building would fit the bill. But first, it would need some TLC and a more homelike atmosphere.

Tri-County Roofing of Flushing, Michigan, and Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects of Flint, Michigan, helped make that happen. A new TPO roofing system was installed to fix long-standing leaks and provide durable, low-maintenance performance. The additions of a mansard roof and gabled accents gave the building’s exterior a more residential aesthetic while retaining its distinctive architectural details.

The new facility opened in December 2019 and is now home to 30 residents.

Preserving the Look

The building is a fixture in Goodrich, a 1,900-resident suburb of Flint. Built in the early 1960s, the facility was originally a 53-bed, full-service hospital. In 1997 it became a hospice. That facility closed in 2013 and the building remained vacant until Flatrock Manor purchased it.

The exterior of the original 18,000-square-foot building embraced the Mid-century modern style popular in the era. Subsequent additions that brought the facility to 23,000 square feet followed suit for a cohesive look.

The building, shown here before renovation work began, was originally a full-service hospital. It was purchased by Flatrock Manor to serve as a foster care center for adults with special developmental and behavioral needs.

The existing roofing system was quintessential Mid-century modern. The built-up roof was surrounded by a slim, 1-foot-high parapet wall with an aluminum cap. A gabled front canopy shielded patients and visitors from the elements while arriving at or leaving the hospital.

While the exterior’s design perfectly suited a hospital, it was too institutional for a facility that would be its residents’ long-term home.

Happily, the task of adapting the building for its new purpose fell to Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects, the same firm that designed the original hospital nearly 60 years earlier. The team embraced the challenge of striking the right balance between preserving architecturally significant features and meeting regulatory guidelines governing the design of long-term care communities.

“Initially we tried to glorify the Mid-century style of the building,” says Michael Murphy, project manager with Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects. “We completed several elevation studies to incorporate some modern ways of dealing with the parapet. Ultimately, we had to go back to the drawing board to achieve a more residential look.”

The gabled roof above the canopy at the main entrance was the starting point from which other design elements took their cue. A mansard roof was incorporated around the building. To balance the main entrance, a gabled canopy was added at a second entryway on the building’s front. Twenty accent gables were spaced out along the building’s entire exterior and gables were added above rear and side entrances.

“We played with the value of scale when incorporating the mansard roof with the horizontal façade of the building,” Murphy says. “We made it more substantial, so it doesn’t look like a short little mansard roof that has been pushed onto the building.”

Owens Corning TrueDefinition Duration Designer shingles in Merlot were chosen for the mansard roof and gables, bringing added warmth to the façade. They were complemented by fascia and soffits from Quality Aluminum Products in Cranberry. Cultured stone in a sandy shade was added on the gable walls and around the windows to accent the original terra cotta-toned brick walls.

A Roof to Perform for the Long Haul

The building’s existing roofing system — ballasted EPDM on top of a built-up roof with fiberglass insulation — was leaking and the EPDM membrane was “in horrible shape,” according to Tim McKnight, president of Tri-County Roofing. “We found nothing but saturated insulation,” he adds. “The only reason that more water hadn’t gotten into the building’s interior was because the asphalt on the BUR roofing system kept it out.”

Both the EPDM and BUR systems would need to be torn off.

During the re-roofing process, a mansard roof was added to give the building a more residential appearance.

The steel 22-gauge B deck remained in good condition and original plans called for it to be retained, but requirements for the new HVAC system and ductwork meant that it, too, needed to be removed and replaced. Mother Nature chose to not make the process easy. Facing a month of frequent rain, the Tri-County Roofing crew worked as quickly as possible and did their best to keep the building’s interior dry; for example, tearing off the existing roof bit by bit around the edges to make space for the carpenters to frame in the new mansard roof before beginning work on the rest of the roof.

In selecting the new roofing system, longevity and hassle-free performance were the top considerations.

“The client wanted something that would last 20 years with no issues,” McKnight says, noting that such performance would require withstanding the broad spectrum of Mid-Michigan’s weather, which ranges from warm, sunny summers to cold, snowy winters.

The client’s original preference was to install a new EPDM system, but McKnight recommended a mechanically fastened TPO system for its durability, easy maintenance and cost effectiveness. A system featuring a white, 60-mil membrane from Mule-Hide Products Co. was specified.

Ensuring Positive Drainage

A new 22-gauge steel B deck was installed. It was dead level to accommodate the building’s plumbing system, which made getting the insulation right essential. Tapered expanded polystyrene (EPS) insulation is designed specifically for such applications, making it the ideal choice for this project.

The building’s existing drainage system — in which water flows from the roof to storm drains in the basement — did not change in the renovations. The Tapered Solutions team at ABC Supply Co. worked from drawings to design a take-off that would provide positive drainage. Even the best drawings are not 100 percent reflective of the reality on the roof, however, so the Tri-County Roofing installation crew inevitably encountered instances where the insulation was slightly off-center from the sump or the real-life walls were not quite where they were shown on the plans. In those cases, the crew fabricated pieces of EPS or polyiso insulation on the jobsite to achieve the proper drainage.

Completing the Installation

The TPO membrane was mechanically attached for a fast, cost-effective installation. “We were able to achieve the 20-year warranty the client wanted without the added labor and materials costs of a fully adhered system,” McKnight explains.

New roof hatches also were installed, providing safer, easier access to the roof — both during the reroofing project and for ongoing maintenance of the roof and rooftop equipment.

For the teams at both Tri-County Roofing and Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects, the most rewarding part of the project was learning about the residents who will live at Flatrock Manor and helping provide them with a comfortable home.

“It was cool to learn about what Flatrock Manor does for people with special needs and see how they’re helping families and meeting needs that you forget are out there,” McKnight says.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Tri-County Roofing, Flushing, Michigan, www.tricountyroofingofmidmichigan.com

Architect: Sedgewick + Ferweda Architects, Flint, Michigan, www.architectsinmichigan.com

Roofing Insulation Take-Off: Tapered Solutions (ABC Supply Co.), www.abcsupply.com/services/tapered-solutions

Roofing Materials Distributor: ABC Supply Co. Inc., www.abcsupply.com

MATERIALS

Roof Membrane: 60-mil white TPO, Mule-Hide Products Co., www.mulehide.com

Shingles: TrueDefinition Duration Designer shingles, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com/roofing

Soffits and Fascia: Quality Aluminum Products, www.qualityaluminum.com

Talented Team Designs and Installs Multiple Roof Systems for Dickies Arena

Dickies Arena in Fort Worth, Texas, hosts the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo as well as concerts and sporting events. Photos: Trail Drive Management Corp.

The new Dickies Arena in Fort Worth, Texas, was designed to echo the iconic Will Rogers Memorial Center, a historic landmark built in 1934. The site of the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo as well as other concerts and sporting events, Dickies Arena was designed to provide a modern entertainment experience and configurable event spaces that would stand the test of time. The multiple roof systems on the project — including the plaza deck surrounding the arena — were essential in delivering on these goals.

Dickies Arena features a domed main roof with a cupola at the top that pays homage to its historic neighbor. “One of the major themes, especially of the dome roof structure itself, was to have a kind of throwback to the original Will Rogers Center, which is still there,” says Eric Nelson, AIA, RID, CCCA, vice president at HKS, the architect of record for Dickies Arena. “The Will Rogers Center was one of the first buildings of its type to have a long-span steel truss roof system. We used that existing structure as the inspiration for the roof structure inside the arena. We have these very thin, elegant looking trusses that are very art deco.”

The new structure’s domed roof is surrounded by low-slope roofs and complemented by two towers topped with metal roofs. Dickies Arena also features a pavilion with a standing seam metal roof, which sits on a plaza deck that serves as an outdoor event space as well as a giant roof system covering exhibit space and areas for housing rodeo livestock. The venue is also designed to provide excellent acoustics for concerts and features luxurious millwork and finishes throughout to provide a touch of elegance. “I like to say that it’s a rodeo arena, but it’s designed like an opera house,” Nelson says.

It took an experienced team of design and construction professionals to envision and execute the project, including HKS, the architect of record; David M. Schwartz Architects, the design architect; The Beck Group, the general contractor; Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc., the roof system installer; and Sunbelt Building Services LLC, the insulation distributor and installer of the plaza deck.

The Dome

The roof system specified for the dome featured an 80-mil PVC system with decorative ribs manufactured by Sika Sarnafil. “The roof system is one that we use pretty regularly on our large sports projects, the Feltback PVC,” notes Nelson. “It’s a lot more durable than other single-ply roof membranes, so we really like it a lot. Dickies Arena is an arena that wasn’t just built for the next 20 years; it’s meant to be there for the next 100 years, so we wanted to make sure we used nothing but the highest-quality materials, especially with all of the hailstorms that we can get out there in Fort Worth.”

The pavilion has a Fabral double-lock standing seam roof system.

The roof system installer, Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas, tackled the dome roof first, followed by the low-slope sections and the metal roofs. Work on the dome roof began in July of 2018. “The project progressed pretty quickly,” says Jeff Eubank, vice president of Jeff Eubank Roofing Co. “The dome in and of itself was like two different projects. The top half of the dome is pretty workable and walkable, and the bottom 40 percent of the dome is almost vertical.”

The Sarnafil Decor system was installed over an Epic acoustical deck, which posed some logistical and safety challenges. “We had to engineer special anchors because a typical tie-off anchor could not be used,” Eubank explains. “Before we could set foot on the job, we had to engineer special tie-off anchors which nested into the acoustical deck.”

Eubank and a structural engineer worked with Epic Deck to construct anchor points that would meet requirements for fall arrest. The half-inch aluminum, F-shaped anchors were designed to rest in the flutes of the acoustical deck and featured a ring provide a tie-off point. They were set in place using a crane.

Safety concerns included the Texas weather. “Our biggest challenge came with the heat,” says Eubank. “Summers in North Texas are brutal enough, but at the end of last summer, a high pressure system just stalled over Fort Worth. We were in the middle of a drought, with temperatures up to 110 degrees. You’re up on a deck with nowhere to hide, and with it was pushing 200 degrees up there. From a life safety standpoint, we ended up pushing the dome installation to night work.”

The main roof on the arena’s dome was topped with an 80-mil PVC system with decorative ribs manufactured by Sika Sarnafil.

Crews applied approximately 250,000 square feet of material on a near vertical application at night, with lighting provided by six tower cranes. The project required 100 percent tie-off of men and equipment.

The original plan for the dome was to work top to bottom, but as work began, the cupola was incomplete, so the safety and logistical plans had to be radically changed. “We ended up basically making two rings around the dome, doing the near-vertical portion — the bottom 30 or 40 percent — first,” Eubank says. “We moved up and did another 360-degree loop around the top half of the dome once the cupola was done.”

The roof system was installed over the acoustical deck and loose-laid filler. After a 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime substrate board was installed, crews mechanically fastened two layers of Sarnatherm polyiso and 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime. They adhered the Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback membrane, which was produced in a custom color called Agreeable Gray.

After the membrane was installed, the PVC ribs were heat welded into place to give it the look of a standing seam roof. “We installed over 16 miles of custom-color Decor ribbing,” notes Eubank.

The Logo on the Roof

The dome roof also prominently features the Dickies Arena logo, which took some advance planning. “We left an area of the ribs out on the east side anticipating the logo up there,” Eubank says. “That’s in another custom color. Sarnafil ran the custom color and templated the letters. The logo is roughly 130 feet by 10 feet, so we received a giant D, a giant I, a giant C, and so forth. Once these things are installed, there is no pulling them up — your only option is to tear the roof off. So, imagine working with a 10-foot letter, 200 feet up in the air, on a slope, and making sure it’s level.”

Eubank Roofing came up with a plan to use a section of 60-mil PVC membrane as a backer sheet. “We laid out this big backer sheet in Agreeable Gray and stenciled all of the letters across it,” Eubank explains. “We took the backer sheet up, got it lasered and leveled, and installed the solid backer sheet on the dome. It already had the stencils on it, so we were able fall back and install the individual letters. We didn’t need to line them up — we just had to fill in the blanks.”

The last steps in the dome installation included installing ribs in a second custom color to go through the letters. Helicopters also brought in three large Dickies signs, which were placed atop concrete pedestals treated with a Sarnafil liquid membrane.

Flat Roofs and Metal Roofs

On the low-slope sections that surround the dome, the Sarnafil G-410 Feltback was installed over structural concrete and fully tapered polyiso. “There is a tremendous amount of masonry work on this project, and it is gorgeous,” Eubank notes. “It was important, though, on the low-slope portions to let the brick work and stone work wrap up before any roofing membranes were installed.”

The design of the arena echoes the iconic Will Rogers Center, which was the inspiration for the thin, elegant steel trusses.

A vapor barrier was installed over the structural concrete deck. After masonry work was completed, crews installed a fully tapered polyiso system in ribbons of OM Board adhesive, then adhered 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime and the 80-mil PVC membrane.

The complex also features two different metal roof systems from Fabral. On the north side of the building, the two towers were capped with a flat-seam panel. Down at the plaza level, the pavilion was topped with a double-lock standing seam roof system featuring Fabral 24-gauge Galvalume Power Seam panels.

According to Nelson, an area underneath the pavilion serves as a warm-up arena for horses during the rodeo, so the design was meant to evoke a rustic effect. “The cladding on that building is all quarter-inch steel with rivets on it,” Nelson points out. “Galvalume is finished to look like galvanized sheet steel, but it won’t tarnish or turn white or black like galvanized steel would — which is why they selected it — but it still has that kind of throwback look of a barn.”

Out of the Gate

Dickies Arena is now open to the public and is gearing up to host its first rodeo. The experienced team that built it has moved on to other projects, but they look back on their work on the new landmark venue with pride.

“I’m very proud of the people that I work with and the thought and care that they put into the project and the time that we take,” Eubank says. “A lot of our work is negotiated re-roofing, and I think that’s in large part because we take the time to think through a problem and come up with the best solution. I think that’s really highlighted here. You’ve got to take your time and do it right — and do it efficiently.”

Eubank commends the general contractor, H.C. Beck, for a smoothly operating jobsite. “The job was very well managed from a safety standpoint,” Eubank says. “The general contractor did a fabulous job of manipulating trade work and making sure no one was working overtop of anyone else.”

Nelson agrees, crediting the teamwork at every phase of the project for the successful outcome. “The partnership with David M. Schwartz as the design architect really worked very smoothly from our side,” Nelson says. “We worked very well with a talented team of consultants and who specialize in sports design. It’s a one-of-a-kind type of project.”

“My family has been in Fort Worth for five generations, and this is a project I’m just tickled to death about for the city,” says Eubank. “To be part of its install means a lot.”

TEAM

Architect of Record: HKS Inc., Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

Design Architect: David M. Schwartz Architects, Washington, D.C., www.dmsas.com

General Contractor: The Beck Group, Dallas, Texas, www.beckgroup.com

Roofing Contractor: Jeff Eubank Roofing Co., Inc., Fort Worth, Texas, www.eubankroofing.com

MATERIALS

Dome Roof

Roof Membrane: Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback PVC with Sarnafil Decor ribs, Sika Sarnafil, https://usa.sika.com/sarnafil

Acoustical Deck: Epic Metals, www.epicmetals.com

Cover Boards: 5/8-inch DensDeck Prime and 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Low-Slope Roof

Roof Membrane: Sarnafil G-410 20 Feltback PVC, Sika Sarnafil

Cover Board: 1/4-inch DensDeck Prime, Georgia-Pacific

Metal Roof

Standing Seam Panel: 24-gauge Galvalume Power Seam, Fabral, www.fabral.com

Underlayment: Fabral HT, Fabral

Plaza Deck

Waterproofing Membrane: TREMproof 6100, Tremco, www.tremcosealants.com

Insulation: Foamular 600, Owens Corning, www.owenscorning.com

Brick Pavers: Hanover, www.hanoverpavers.com

Owens Corning Invites Attendees to Catch a Wave at IRE

Mention Texas and thoughts typically turn to cowboys and rodeos. But during the International Roofing Expo (IRE) February 4-6 in Dallas, Texas, Owens Corning will bring the spectacle of surfing to its booth (2604). Whether IRE attendees “hang loose” or “hang 10,” they can register to win a custom surfboard designed by Owens Corning and crafted in California.

Why surf in a land of turf? The one-of-a-kind pink surfboard pays homage to the Pacific surf culture as well as the relaxed, refreshing and unexpected vibe of Owens Corning 2020 Shingle Color of the Year Pacific Wave — a shingle color that looks equally at home on a coastal beach house, modern farm house or stately colonial.

No ocean? No problem! The surfboard makes a great conversation piece in any “man cave” or office showroom. Or strap it atop a van and take it on your next beach vacay. The color Pacific Wave and the surfboard help reset conventional notions of blue hues on a home by offering a fun way to “catch a wave” in land-locked Dallas, Texas. The surfboard giveaway is open to all who attend the IRE and the winner will be announced after the show closes. Visitors to the Owens Corning Booth can snap a photo with the Pink Panther and surfboard, then share it with the “surfer lingo” hashtags #OwensCorningRoofing #ShingleColoroftheYear. 

For more information, visit https://www.owenscorning.com/roofing.