Metal Roof and Wall Panels Capture the Spirit of Shakespearean Theater

The Otto M. Budig Theater is the home of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. The new theater was designed by GBBN Architects in Cincinnati. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp

For many new arenas and theaters, the sheer size and scope of the project can pose the biggest hurdles. At the new Otto M. Budig Theater, home of the Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, the problem was the reverse. The intimate theater was shoehorned into an existing space up against an adjacent building, so logistics were tight. But that didn’t mean the roof system couldn’t be striking. Designed by GBBN Architects in Cincinnati, the building’s exterior features daring angles and multi-colored metal roof and wall panels that combine to help capture the spirit of the Shakespearean theater.

Matt Gennett, senior project manager and vice president of Tecta America Zero Company in Cincinnati, oversaw the roofing portion of the new construction project in the Over the Rhine section of Cincinnati on the corner of Elm Street and 12th Street. “This building was plugged in downtown, and they fit everything in real tight,” he says.

Approximately 5,400 square feet of PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch, 24-gauge Corrugated Panels from Petersen Aluminum Corp. were installed on the metal roofs and walls. Tecta America Zero Company installed the metal roof systems, as well as a TPO roof manufactured by Carlisle SynTec over the main structure and mechanical well. Work began in January of 2017 and the roofing portion of the project was wrapped up in late August.

The Metal Roof System

The building features two different metal roof systems. The roof on the Elm Street side is comprised of three intersecting triangle-shaped sections in two colors, Champagne Metallic and Custom Metallic Bronze. “There were several unique angles on the roof,” Gennett explains. “On the top, there was a second metal roof, a shed roof that went down to the 12th Street side.”

The theater’s roof and walls feature approximately 5,400 square feet of PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels from Petersen Aluminum Corp. in two colors. The wall panels are perforated. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The metal roof systems were installed over a 2-inch layer of polyisocyanurate insulation and a 2-1/2-inch nail base from Hunter Panels, H-Shield NB. The nail base is a composite panel with a closed-cell polyisocyanurate foam core, a fiber-reinforced facer on one side and, in this case, 7⁄16-inch oriented strand board (OSB) on the other. The nail base was topped with Carlisle WIP 300 HT waterproofing underlayment to dry in the roof.

Crews also installed two rows of snow guards on the metal roof using the S-5! CorruBracket. “The snow guard was a little different,” Gennett says. “It was specifically designed for a corrugated roof.”

The TPO Roof System

The main roof and mechanical well were covered with the TPO roof system, which totaled approximately 8,300 square feet. After Carlisle VapAir Seal725 TR self-adhering air and vapor barrier was applied to the metal deck, crews installed two layers of 2-inch iso. Tapered insulation was applied over the top to ensure proper drainage. The insulation was covered with a 1/2-inch sheetrock and the 60-mil TPO was fully adhered.

Two large smoke hatches manufactured by Bilco were installed over the stage area. The ACDSH smoke hatches measured 66 inches by 144 inches, and are designed for theaters, concert halls and other interior applications that require limiting noise intrusion.

The Installation

The initial focus was to get the roof dried in so work could progress inside the building. The jobsite conditions posed a few challenges. The structure abutted an existing building, and the space was tight. The schedule necessitated multiple trips to the site, which can be a budget-buster on a small project. “We had a lot of trips in and out to accommodate the schedule and get everything dried in so they could meet the interior schedule,” notes Gennett. “We were sort of on call. We made three or four trips out to roof this small project, so it took a lot of coordination because it was completed in pieces.”

Crews tackled the TPO roof sections first. The mechanical well section provided several challenges. Changes in the mechanical well layout necessitated moving some curbs and making adjustments to the tapered insulation. “They were trying to get lot of equipment into a small space,” Gennett explains. “We had to make sure we could get the water to the low spots and route it around all of that equipment. That was probably the biggest challenge on the project.”

Staging material was also problematic, as traffic was heavy and parking space was at a premium. Material was loaded by a crane, which had to be set up in the street. “It’s a postage stamp of a site,” says Gennett. “This is a main thoroughfare, and there is a school right across the street. We had to work around school hours, and we couldn’t be working when the busses were coming in. We usually came in after school started, around 8 a.m., to load materials.”

When it came time to load the metal panels, the cramped jobsite actually paid off. “It was very convenient,” Gennett recalls. “We were able to load the panels onto the adjacent roof and just hand them over. We had a nice staging area for cutting, so all in all it wasn’t bad.”

The corrugated panels were installed with matching edge metal. “It’s not a complicated panel to install, and they look really nice,” Gennett notes. “On the Elm Street side, to the right of the valley was one color, and to the left was another, so we had to match the color with our coping. There were some interesting transitions with our metal. We also had to really pay attention to how the siding was being installed so we could match the metal to the siding and follow the transitions from color to color.”

The perforated wall panels were installed by ProCLAD Inc. of Noblesville, Indiana. “Once the walls were done, we came in and did the transition metal,” Gennett says. “We just had to make sure everything lined up perfectly.”

Planning Ahead

Ensuring a safe jobsite was the top priority for Tecta America Zero and Messer Construction, the general contractor on the project. “Both Messer Construction and Tecta America take safety very seriously. That’s why we’re good partners,” Gennett says. “We had PPE, high-visibility clothing, hard hats, safety glasses for the whole project. All of the guys were required to have their OSHA 10. Anyone outside of the safety barriers had to be tied off 100 percent of the time.”

Planning ahead was the key to establishing the safety plan and meeting the schedule while ensuring a top-quality installation. “This job had a lot of in and out, which is tough in the roofing business,” Gennett says. “But we planned ahead, we made sure everything was ready for us when we mobilized, and we did a good job of coordinating with the other trades. It took a lot of meetings and discussions — just good project management.”

Gennett credits the successful installation to a great team effort between everyone involved, including the general contractor, the subcontractors, and the manufacturers. “We pride ourselves on our great, skilled crews and our great field project management,” he says. “Our superintendents are there every day checking the work and making sure the guys have everything they need. Messer Construction is great to work with, and obviously having the manufacturer involved the project and doing their inspections as well helps ensure the quality meets everyone’s standards and holds the warranty.”

The theater is now another exciting venue in the Over the Rhine neighborhood. “It is really cool spot,” Gennett says. “It’s an up-and-coming neighborhood that’s grown in leaps and bounds in the last seven years. There is a ton going on in Cincinnati. It’s just another part of the city that makes it really fun to go downtown.”

TEAM

Architect: GBBN Architects, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.gbbn.com
General Contractor: Messer Construction, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.messer.com
Roofing Contractor: Tecta America Zero Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, www.tectaamerica.com
Wall Panel Installer: ProCLAD Inc., Noblesville, Indiana, www.procladinc.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof:
Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels, Petersen Aluminum Corp., www.pac-clad.com
Wall Panels: PAC-CLAD 7/8-inch Corrugated Panels, Petersen Aluminum Corp.
Nail Base: H-Shield NB, Hunter Panels, www.HunterPanels.com
Snow Guards: CorruBracket, S-5!, www.S-5.com
Waterproofing Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300 HT, Carlisle SynTec, www.CarlisleSyntec.com

TPO Roof:
Membrane: 60-mil grey TPO, Carlisle SynTec
Waterproofing Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300 HT, Carlisle SynTec
Smoke Hatches: ACDSH Acoustical Smoke Hatch, The Bilco Co., www.Bilco.com

Petersen to Open PAC-CLAD Manufacturing Facility in Phoenix

Petersen is expanding the reach of its trusted PAC-CLAD brand by opening a new manufacturing facility in Phoenix. The 52,000-square-foot facility is scheduled to be fully operational in the first quarter of 2018, and will be equipped to provide the Western U.S. construction market with the full line of PAC-CLAD steel and aluminum cladding products, including standing seam roof panels, hidden- and exposed-fastener wall panels, sheet, coil and more.
 
The expansion West provides a solution to growth challenges Petersen has faced, said Mike Petersen, CEO. “To date, we have been limited in our ability to effectively service customers in the Western United States, largely because of the challenges and high costs of transporting products from our Texas and Illinois facilities and over the Rocky Mountains. By opening this Phoenix facility, we’re creating a foundation on which to grow the PAC-CLAD brand into the West Coast market,” Petersen said.
 
The new facility will be managed by David Hedrick, whose background includes more than 15 years of management leadership in both the manufacturing and architectural metals industries. “I’m excited about joining the Petersen team and opening this new PAC-CLAD manufacturing facility. The Arizona PAC-CLAD team looks forward to providing the Western United States construction industry with the high-quality PAC-CLAD products and professional service the rest of the country has enjoyed for more than 50 years,” Hedrick said.
 
Petersen’s facility is located in existing commercial space south of downtown Phoenix. Questions and inquiries about the Phoenix facility can be directed via email to Rob Heselbarth at rheselbarth@petersenmail.com. The Phoenix location is the sixth for Petersen, joining the company’s other facilities in Elk Grove Village, Ill.; Acworth, Ga.; Tyler, Texas; Annapolis Junction, Md.; and Andover, Minn.

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Metal Roof and Wall Panels Provide Industrial Aesthetic to Texas Ranch

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

As many architects can attest, designing a residence for oneself can present challenges. But architect Jack Carson rose to the occasion by creating a striking design for his new home, located on a ranch in the beautiful Texas Hill Country. Design for the 7,000-square-foot residence follows LEED principles and blends a unique palette of “industrial” materials with ultra-modern aesthetics.

“The house is truly on a ranch. We have cattle on the property,” says Carson, president of Carson Design Associates in Austin, Texas. “We wanted to keep the design somewhat in the ranch vernacular but with a contemporary look. The reliance on metal for the roof and cladding and an exposed structure helped create a ranch building feel. We like to think of it as an ‘industrial ranch’ aesthetic.”

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

Several of Petersen Aluminum’s PAC-CLAD profiles contributed to Carson’s success in delivering the desired look. Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof. The 16-inch roof panels were rollformed onsite because of extremely tight site conditions and because the only access to the site was via a dirt road that wasn’t wide enough to allow large trucks to deliver factory-formed panels. An additional 3,000 square feet of Snap-Clad panels also was installed vertically as siding around two garages and at specific locations on the house as accent panels.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed. All wall panels were manufactured at Petersen’s Tyler, Texas, plant.

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The onsite fabrication of the roof panels and the installation of all roof and wall panels was performed by Dean Contracting Co., Kyle, Texas. “The greatest challenge was executing the architects dream for his home,” recalls Jesse Brown, vice president of Dean Contracting. “The design included a myriad of varying geometric shapes on many different planes and a blend of materials that required complex detailing. It was probably one of the top-five most challenging jobs that we have ever done.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass. “We have great views into the valley with no neighbors,” Carson adds. “A large overhanging soffit covers a large portion of the deck and shades all of the glass.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.” Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit. Petersen functioned as distributor of the Reynobond ACM.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

The decision to use Petersen for the roof and siding was arrived at rather easily. Carson notes: “I was familiar with PAC-CLAD and wanted to use it but also wanted to rely on the builder’s recommendations regarding materials and subcontractors. In our very first meeting with the roofer, Dean Contracting, they brought in samples of PAC-CLAD and recommended using it. That made the decision pretty easy.”

Carson is a big believer in metal as a roofing and cladding material. “We wanted to be as maintenance-free as possible. And sustainability was an important component as well,” Carson says. “We used LEED principles in our design. Metal is far greener than asphalt shingles and other alternatives. It’s just a great option for residential construction.”

The installation went smoothly, Carson adds, primarily because he relied on the expertise of Dean Contracting. “My approach is to listen to the experts. Jesse Brown and his crew worked out the complex detailing. They use metal all the time and are extremely capable. We collaborated as necessary but I basically left it in their hands.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

Brown was quick to give full credit to the crew that was led by Juan Rojas, sheet-metal superintendent. Rojas is a 24-year employee of Dean Contracting and Brown cites Rojas’ attention to function and precise detailing as a main reason why the job turned out so well.

The house—in spite of its size and location in the hot Texas climate and the large amount of glass—is energy efficient. Two inches of rigid insulation was installed under the metal roof and an additional 4 inches of sprayed insulation went under the roof deck. “The heavy insulation and the shade provided by the overhang makes it very energy efficient. The house stays a very constant temperature,” Carson says.

The entire property captures rainwater in 18,000-gallon collection tanks, which is yet another reason for using metal, Carson points out.

When asked about the challenge of designing for yourself, Carson thought it was easier than designing for a traditional client. “I was probably more demanding in ‘getting it right’, but once I knew I had the right design and materials, I didn’t have to convince myself that it was the best direction. There was no negotiation or comprising the design in any way,” Carson says. “The biggest problem any architect has in designing for themselves is in ‘editing out.’ We know all of the possibilities, and being able to prioritize and filter out the unnecessary options is often the hardest challenge.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Project Profiles: Health Care

Mount Carmel New Albany, New Albany, Ohio

Team

Roofing Contractor: Smith Roofing, Columbus, Ohio

Bellaforté Slate composite roofing in Smokey Gray was installed on the 117,668-square-foot hospital.

Bellaforté Slate composite roofing in Smokey Gray was installed on the 117,668-square-foot hospital.

Roof Materials

Bellaforté Slate composite roofing in Smokey Gray was installed on the 117,668-square-foot hospital. The composite roofing has achieved a Class A Fire Rating in the ASTME E 108 fire test and withstands straight-line winds up to 110 mph in the ASTM D 3161 test. The roof tiles also resist impact, severe weather conditions and wind-driven rain. Bellaforté Slate tiles not only add safety to the structure, they also add aesthetic appeal.

Composite Roofing Manufacturer: DaVinci Roofscapes

Roof Report

The 60-room hospital features eight operating rooms and specializes in outpatient and inpatient orthopedic, neurologic and musculoskeletal care. The roof was installed in May 2015.

PHOTO: DaVinci Roofscapes

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Petersen Aluminum Celebrates 50 Years of Serving the Construction Industry

Petersen Aluminum Corp. is celebrating its 50th anniversary by honoring the first five decades of company history as it prepares for a bright future. Maurice “Maury” Petersen founded the company on Feb. 15, 1965 as an aluminum distributor in Chicago, then worked with his son Mike as the company grew to become one of the construction industry’s architectural metals manufacturers.

“Fifty years in business is a noteworthy milestone, and we’re thrilled to not only still be in business, but to be thriving,” says Mike Petersen, CEO. “Our ability to identify, plan for and adapt to a myriad of market opportunities has been a big reason for our success. I am proud to have taken the reins from my father and help build on the foundation he laid 50 years ago. This is an exciting time for Petersen Aluminum, and I think we’re in good position to tackle the next 50 years.”

The main key to the company’s success is the hard work of dedicated employees in every position at Petersen Aluminum. Petersen notes the importance of the company’s vast supply of institutional knowledge, with a management team that averages 34 years of employment and includes many who worked with Maury, who passed away in 1996.

Dedication and longevity can be found at the company’s five locations, too, where it is common to meet people who have worked for the company for 15, 20 and 30 years or more. Providing employees with a corporate culture that fosters professional development, personal accountability and an enjoyable environment is important at Petersen Aluminum. “We take pride in giving our personnel a chance to develop their skills in an entrepreneurial environment. I am proud of how many people have chosen to devote their careers to PAC,” he adds.

Customers, partners and industry friends wanting to acknowledge Petersen Aluminum’s 50th anniversary are encouraged to leave a message on Petersen Aluminum’s Facebook page.

Management’s Perspective

Members of Petersen Aluminum’s executive management team average more than 30 years working at the company, and all are deeply invested in its success. President John Palesny has the longest tenure at 45 years, and cites several reasons for the company’s endurance.

“The financial strength of the company is a prime reason for our longevity,” says Palesny. “Maury Petersen, the founder of our company, had a mantra that he repeated often: pay down your debt. Maury grew up during the Depression and it had a life-long impact on his thinking about financial responsibility. While he was a risk taker when it came to business opportunities, he also believed in paying down debt whenever the opportunity arose. That attitude has been a part of PAC’s culture throughout the years.

“PAC has always given its people wide latitude in pursuing their objectives. We believe in local initiative and give managers free rein as to how they meet their goals,” Palesny continues. “We have excellent internal communications that are focused on how we can better serve our customers. Our people are confident in their abilities while keeping their egos well in check. Among my colleagues at Petersen Aluminum there is a closeness that few other organizations can match. Most of us have been here for a number of years and wouldn’t dream of working anywhere else. I think that says a lot about the management philosophy of Maury and Mike Petersen.”

Jon Snyder, vice president, also believes in the value of good people and their contribution to the success of Petersen Aluminum. “Maury believed that every employee is a salesperson for the company, and to keep your employees and customers happy. Maury always preached, ‘have fun, work hard and no politics,’” Snyder remembers. “Our company was built on a strong, professional sales-minded approach. We have found our niches along the way and worked hard to succeed within them, but have always been willing to change when necessary.”

Snyder adds that while Petersen Aluminum can be conservative and strives to operate without debt, the company isn’t afraid to take necessary risks, and when those efforts are financially rewarded, “We pour the rewards back into our business and our people.”

Vice President Mike Palesny recalls the company’s respect for and attention to the customer. “We may not be the lowest price in the marketplace, but we are always competitive in terms of customer service levels. And we pay attention to what the market wants. For example, at our early stages in the architectural marketplace, our focus was on anodized finishes. We recognized in the late ’70s that Kynar was the future and successfully made that tack. In the late ’80s and early ’90s we recognized the call for factory-formed roofing panels and dove in. Now we’re seeing the company focus on the entire building envelope, and of particular interest the exterior walls. I think our wall panel business will be a source of real growth for the company in the next 10 years,” Palesny says.

Mike Palesny hopes to see the business continue to grow and diversify both geographically and possibly through additional product lines. “We are a conservatively managed company and I think our future is bright. We’ve adapted to market shifts by paying attention to our balance sheet, paying off our debts and listening to our customers, which we will continue to do,” he notes.

Tom Bell, vice president, adds, “Of all the things that make Petersen Aluminum such a great company, none is more important than the talent and dedication of our employees day after day, for after all this is the only truly sustainable competitive advantage any company can process in this marketplace.”

Adapting, Investing in Quality

Adaptation is a critical skill for any business to possess, as Petersen Aluminum has demonstrated for 50 years. As technology changes the way construction professionals communicate and process information to meet critical project timelines, Petersen Aluminum continues to adapt to meet the needs of those professionals. For example, the company’s website provides e-tools that include everything required to shop for, specify, bid, purchase and install its metal products, as well as apps for tablets and smartphones that accomplish the same goals on whichever operating platform a professional might need.

Petersen Aluminum also is committed to quality products and service, and can prove it. In 2006, along with its corporate partners Valspar and Precoat Metals, a formal quality control program was initiated. The QC program that was developed has greatly enhanced the quality and consistency of the product Petersen Aluminum brings to market. “As a result of this ongoing program, the product that goes out the door is as good or better than anything available in the commercial market, and field issues with our product have become practically nonexistent,” Mike Petersen says.

Petersen Aluminum keeps its focus on the future, including how to address external market forces that are sure to include sustainable construction, material supplies and prices, competition for materials, construction workforce shifts, regulation, consolidation and others. “We’ve been successfully navigating market shifts and challenges through our history and we will continue to do so,” Petersen says.

Company History

In February 1965, Maurice Petersen began operation of Petersen Aluminum as an aluminum distributor in Chicago. The concept was to distribute aluminum mill products for aluminum producers not having a distributor organization or outlets for their products. Two manufacturers of truck cabs and printing plates promised support in the new venture.

Business began in a pie-shaped office rented for $75 a month. The lists of partners and customers grew as did revenue. Early on, the company moved frequently as business grew. By 1967, the company owned a truck, a 60-inch cut-to-length line, a shear and a saw. An unofficial company motto evolved: work hard, have fun, no politics.

In July 1972, Petersen Aluminum relocated to Schiller Park, Ill., and acquired an aluminum anodizing line, a decision that launched the company into the architectural metals arena. The company continues to maintain an anodizing line today. During that period, the company developed its PAC-CLAD product line beginning with prefinished Kynar 500 aluminum and later adding prefinished PAC-CLAD steel. During the next two and a half decades, Petersen Aluminum grew its revenue and product line while expanding geographically, until 1994 when the company constructed and moved into its headquarters in Elk Grove Village, Ill., where it remains today. The architectural metals manufacturer also operates facilities in four branch locations including Acworth, Ga.; Tyler, Texas; Annapolis Junction, Md.; and Fridley, Minn.

Petersen Aluminum strives to provide high-quality products within reliable, dependable lead times. Its strong national sales base allows it to maintain large inventories and provide cost economies to its customers. The product line now includes architectural and structural roofing, metal wall panels, soffit, composite panels, edge metals, aluminum and steel coil, and flat sheet in painted, anodized and mill finish.

Long-recognized as an industry manufacturer of metal standing seam roofing products, Petersen also offers exposed fastener panels, flush panels, composite wall panels and column covers. All provide the well-known Petersen quality and are available in PAC-CLAD Kynar 500 finish in 38 standard colors on steel and 37 aluminum. Most colors meet LEED, ENERGY STAR and Cool Roof Rating Council certification requirements.