Custom-Colored Metal Panels Create Standout Roof for Pennsylvania School

Approximately 18,000 square feet of 22-gauge Tite-Loc Plus panels in a custom finish help emphasize the angled gables topping the new school. Photos: hortonphotoinc.com

Latrobe Elementary School is a state-of-the-art facility featuring two-story classroom wings, a cafeteria with a stage, a full-prep kitchen, gymnasium, media center, science and technology classrooms, band/music rooms, a center for student creativity, administrative offices and support spaces designed to serve nearly 700 students.

Located outside of Pittsburgh in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, the school is within easy driving distance of several popular ski areas, and the building’s design, by Monroeville, Pennsylvania-based Axis Architecture, has a bit of a Swiss chalet in its roofline.

More than 18,000 square feet of Petersen’s Tite-Loc Plus roof panels in a distinct, custom Marquis Orange finish help emphasize the angled gables topping the new school. The 22-gauge panels, along with 3,800 square feet of .032 gauge PAC-750 soffit, complement the classic terra cotta-toned brick that clads the upper two-thirds of the school’s façade.

The roof also features low-slope sections where a hot asphalt roof system from The Garland Company was installed.  

Installing the Roof Systems

The roof systems were installed by Pennsylvania Roofing Systems (PRS), headquartered in Bakerstown, Pennsylvania. PRS handles all types of commercial roofing, including slate, tile, hot asphalt, built-up, single-ply and sheet metal.

The new construction project was appealing to the company for several reasons, including the size and the scopes of work that included metal and hot built-up roofing.

Crews from Pennsylvania Roofing Systems installed the metal panels, along with 3,800 square feet of .032 gauge PAC-750 soffit.

Two different crews tackled the metal roofs and flat roofs as the sections were being built by the general contractor, The Foreman Group.

On the low-slope sections, one crew installed the Garland hot asphalt roof system, consisting of insulation, base plies, and Garland’s modified cap sheet. Another crew tackled the metal roof, installing 16-inch-wide PAC-CLAD Tite-Loc Plus panels, which were mechanically seamed.

Pennsylvania Roofing Systems faced quite a challenge on this project as the acoustical deck for approximately half the building was running in the wrong direction. This posed a problem, as attaching the clips for the metal panels would perforate the acoustical deck. PRS came up with a solution to the problem. The company fabricated a 16-gauge hat channel that was installed over the acoustical decking, and the clips were fastened to it.  

The roof panels were rolled on the site. PRS used its own Series 1100 National Crane and a Skytrak to lift material to the roof. Crews also installed 3,800 square feet of .032 gauge PAC-750 soffit.

The Snow Guards

School administrators were concerned about mounting snow on the new metal roof and the safety of schoolchildren down below, so material supplier Brock Associates suggested installing ColorGard snow retention by S-5! The S-5! system is exclusively recommended by both Petersen, the roof manufacturer, and Brock Associates, the panel supplier.

The S-5! ColorGard snow retention system installed on 10 sections of the metal roof perfectly matches the roof color.

Manufactured from certified, high-tensile aluminum and extensively tested for load-to-failure results, ColorGard controls roof snow migration and dramatically reduces the risks associated with rooftop avalanches.

PRS installed the snow retention system on 10 sections of the metal roof. The non-penetrating system was easy to install and perfectly matches the roof color. After the panels are mechanically seamed, the non-penetrating S-5-V Clamps are installed. The ColorGard system features a continuous extruded aluminum crossmember, and strips of prepainted metal are slid into the face of ColorGard to match the roof.

Great Teamwork

The complicated project went smoothly, according to PRS, thanks in part to excellent coordination between the general contractor and various trades. PRS management noted the company selected Petersen’s PAC-CLAD products because of the manufacturer’s excellent local representation, including distributor Brock Associates. Petersen’s reputation for good field support also played a role in this selection.

TEAM

Architect: Axis Architecture, Monroeville, Pennsylvania, www.axisarchitecturepc.com

General Contractor: The Foreman Group, Zelienople, Pennsylvania, www.foremangroup.com

Roofing Contractor: Pennsylvania Roofing Systems, Bakerstown, Pennsylvania

Supplier: Brock Associates, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, www.brock-assoc.com

MATERIALS

Metal Panels: Tite-Loc Plus, PAC-CLAD | Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Low-Slope Roof System: Three-Ply Mineral Mod Bit System in hot asphalt with two plies Type IV Felt and Stressply FR Mineral, The Garland Company, www.garlandco.com

Snow Retention System: ColorGard, S-5-V Clamps, VersaClip and SnoClip II, S-5! www.s-5.com

Outfitter’s New Roof Is Designed to Look Great, Withstand the Elements

When the owners of the Bass Pro location in Pearl, Mississippi, looked for a new roof, they initially considered the spruce green color shared by many of the company’s other outlets, but the existing fascia boards inspired them to choose Colonial Red from Petersen’s palette of stock colors. Photos: hortonphotoinc.com

Bass Pro Shops brands itself as a supplier of performance products designed to endure the great outdoors, but at its Pearl, Mississippi, store, the roof was falling short of that standard. The roof’s mix of membrane and metal roof systems was damaged during a severe weather event, which prompted a re-roofing initiative.

“They had a hailstorm come through and they wanted to upgrade,” says Roman Malone, president of the installing firm, E. Cornell Malone Corp., based in nearby Jackson, Mississippi. In addition to installing a new membrane roof, the project including replacing the existing bare Galvalume steel panels with 59,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roofing panels Kynar-finished in PAC-CLAD Colonial Red. The panels form the highly visible sloped portions of the roof, along with a canopy overhang over the building’s storefront walkway and entrance.

After the metal roof system was installed, crews completed Firestone TPO roof on the low-slope section.

The 100,000-square-foot store was a founding anchor retailer in the 150-acre-plus Bloomfield Development. It shares the title with Trustmark Park, home of the Atlanta Braves’ minor-league baseball team, the Mississippi Braves. People visit the retailer for more than just shopping — the facility includes a large aquarium, shooting gallery and 3-D archery range along with a bar and restaurant. Since its 2005 opening, the surrounding development has grown to include The Outlets of Mississippi, the state’s largest outlet center, which welcomes almost 4.5 million visitors every year.

The metal portion of the re-roofing effort included removing the existing panels along with the ice and water shield below, while the existing plywood decking and insulation remained in good shape. For the roofing pros from E. Cornell Malone, the heavily trafficked surroundings proved a greater challenge than the roof itself. “We had to keep the front door open,” Malone recalls. “The flagpole and the tallest part of the standing seam roof are right over the main entrance. There was a period of time when we had to work there, and we had to use the exit door as an entrance and block off that area for safety reasons. We had to move as fast as we could to minimize the disruption. We also had to use cranes to get the material up to the roof and the demolished material off the roof.”

Eye-Catching Color

While the profile of the standing-seam roof remained similar to its original appearance, the Colonial Red finish certainly creates a major pop for the building. Malone says store managers initially were considering the spruce green color shared by many of the company’s other outlets, when they happened upon Colonial Red in Petersen’s palette of stock colors. “The fascia boards just happened to be the same color as the roof — so, when they saw the Colonial Red, it was an obvious color choice for them,” Malone says. “We didn’t paint that fascia, and it just matched perfectly. I believe this is the first Bass Pro Shop in the country to use this color on their roof. It looks really good.”

E. Cornell Malone Corp. installed approximately 59,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roofing panels on the project.

Crews installed the metal roof system first, and then completed the installation of the single-ply roof on the low-slope section. “We had to use the flat roof as a work platform to reach the high part of the metal roof. We protected what was there, and then came back and put the TPO roof on. That way, we wouldn’t damage it during the installation of the metal roof.”

Crews mechanically attached a Firestone 60-mil TPO system over 1/4-inch DensDeck cover board. “The TPO portion of the project was pretty straightforward,” Malone says. “The highlight of this project is really the metal roof. You can’t see the TPO roof from the ground, but it complemented everything else, brought everything under warranty and got them up to date.”

An interesting detail on the project involved the large flagpole on the metal roof over the entrance. The safety system incorporates shock absorbing anchors, S-5! clamps, and a 100 feet of stainless steel line with hands-fee Unigrab Travelers and dedicated lanyards. “We worked with a safety company, Rooftop Anchor, to engineer a safety system so people could manage the flag and be safe,” Malone says. “Before that, the owners used to hire us to come out and raise and lower their flag. Now that they have a safety system in place, they can manage the flag themselves.”

Feedback on the new roof has been very positive, notes Malone. “The customers are ecstatic about the roof. It has totally transformed the building — it’s definitely an upgrade.”

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: E. Cornell Malone Corp., Jackson, Mississippi, www.ecmalone.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: Snap-Clad roofing panels Kynar-finished in PAC-CLAD Colonial Red, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Low-Slope Roof: 60-mil TPO, Firestone Building Products, www.firestonebpco.com

Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, www.buildgp.com

Flagpole Safety System: Rooftop Anchor, Heber City, Utah, www.rooftopanchor.com

Standing Seam Clamps: S-5!, www.s-5.com

New Box Rib Wall Panels Expand Design Options

Petersen expands its family of PAC-CLAD Precision Series wall panels with the introduction of the Box Rib line. The four new Box Rib wall panels feature 87-degree rib angles and a variety of rib spacing patterns.

The Box Rib architectural wall panels are 1-3/8 inches deep with a nominal 12-inch width. According to the company, they deliver design flexibility while combining bold visual effects with easy, cost-effective installation. Each of the four Box Rib profiles is offered in a no-clip fastener-flange option, or a clip-fastened panel to accommodate thermal expansion and contraction.

Architects and designers can specify one of the four panel profiles or combine multiple Box Rib panels on the same surface to create custom patterns of ribs and valleys. According to the company, Petersen’s Box Rib panels are ideal for practically any structure that requires exterior wall cladding such as schools, hospitals, banks, sports facilities, office and industrial buildings, and most other nonresidential applications, but also residential buildings.

“Petersen continues to respond to architects who tell us they want more options for wall cladding by introducing the Box Rib line,” said Mike Petersen, president of Petersen. “As architects’ creativity evolves, our product line also evolves with the same high-quality manufacturing, technical support and testing that Petersen is known for.”

The Box Rib panels are part of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Precision Series line of wall panels, which means they can be mixed with the seven Precision Series Highline wall cladding products to create a wide variety of custom patterns for a building’s exterior. The Box Rib panels are backed by the following tests: ASTM E-330, ASTM E-1592, ASTM E-283 and 331, AAMA 501.

Minimum Box Rib panel length is 4 feet; maximum lengths are 30 feet for steel, and 22 feet for aluminum on the no-clip fastener-flange version, with longer lengths available on clip panels. The Box Rib panels are available in 24 and 22-gauge steel, .032 and .040 aluminum in 46 standard PAC-CLAD colors, plus Galvalume Plus. BIM, CAD and related files are being posted on pac-clad.com as they become available.

Box Rib panels, as well as all Precision Series wall panels, can be installed horizontally or vertically. Additionally, Precision Series Box Rib, Highline and HWP panels can be specified as perforated, but only in aluminum for use in applications such as equipment screens, over graphics or for architectural flair.

Petersen, a Carlisle company, manufactures PAC-CLAD architectural metal cladding products in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. PAC-CLAD products include standing seam roof panels, hidden- and exposed-fastener wall panels, flush- and reveal-joint panels, vented or solid soffit panels, perforated metal, coil and flat sheet, composite panels, column covers, plus fascia and coping.

For more information, visit pac-clad.com.

New Steel and Aluminum Standing Seam Roof Panel Offers Bi-Directional Installation

Petersen expands its line of PAC-CLAD standing seam roof products with the addition of the T-250 panel. Combining structural performance with architectural aesthetics, architects will enjoy the bolder profile of the T-250, installing contractors will appreciate the bi-directional installation capabilities and building owners will benefit from the panel’s impressive strength.

The strongest of all PAC-CLAD roof products, the T-250 panel is available in 16- and 18-inch widths in multiple gauges of steel and aluminum. T-250 features a nominal 2.65-inch seam height above the roof deck. It is available in all 45 standard PAC-CLAD colors, each of which carries a 30-year non-prorated finish warranty. A weathertightness warranty also is available.

“Our T-250 panel satisfies the needs of architects designing structures that include expansive roof areas requiring long panel runs” said Mike Petersen, president. “Plus, architects might also prefer the wider seam of the T-250 panel, which creates bold shadow lines. The T-250 panel follows Petersen’s drive to continue adding products that expand the creative palette of building designers.”

Standard panel condition for the T-250 is with striations, but smooth is an option. The T-250 is available in 24 and 22 gauge steel, and .032 and .040 gauge aluminum. The T-250 can be specified with a traditional intermittent fastening clip, or a continuous clip fastening system for high-performance open-framing scenarios where extra strength is required. Both clips allow for thermal expansion and contraction. Job-specific design calculations should be performed to determine the type of clip required.

The panel is bi-directional, which allows installers to position the first panel in the center of a roof and install simultaneously in both directions, making it easy to achieve an attractive symmetrical look, while allowing multiple crews to work at the same time.

Named for the shape created where two panels meet, the T-250 is a symmetrical panel whose seams form the letter T. A metal cap is placed over the T and a mechanical seamer bends each side of the cap under the top of the T to form a strong bond. The T-250 panel is equipped with the following tests: ASTM 283, 331, 1680, 1646, E1592 and E2140, plus FM 4474 as well as UL 580 and 1897.

PAC T-250 panels can be factory- or field-formed to length but must be field-seamed. The panels have been designed for application over a wide variety of substrates on roof slopes as low as 1/2:12. Sealant beads are factory-applied to the seam cover. The seam cover is roll formed in the factory.

Substrates may include 5/8-inch minimum plywood, nailboard insulation or equal with WIP 300 underlayment applied horizontally from eave to ridge. Other substrates may include metal decking, purlins or rigid insulation in conjunction with bearing plates, and open framing.

Maximum factory-produced panel length for the T-250 is 54 feet, but longer lengths are available through field forming. Seam covers will be limited to 30-foot maximum lengths and must be field-lapped.

For more information, visit pac-clad.com.

Petersen Adds Reps to Meet Demand for Metal Cladding in Western U.S.

Petersen is meeting the growing demand in the Western United States for its PAC-CLAD metal roof and wall products by hiring several representatives in the area. The manufacturer representatives will support architects, installing contractors and others involved in the specification and installation of exterior metal cladding products in Utah, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, Washington, Oregon and Alaska.

Horner and Associates in Sandy, Utah, hornerassocd7.com, will represent Petersen’s PAC-CLAD products in Utah, Wyoming, Idaho and Montana. Representatives include Gary Horner, Tom Horner and Keith Van Ness. Contact information is as follows:

Gary Horner      801-712-0326     gary@hornerassocd7.com

Tom Horner       801-842-8305     tom@hornerassocd7.com

Keith Van Ness 801-520-5624     keith@hornerassocd7.com

 Harper Winn Inc. in Seattle, harperwinn.com, will support PAC-CLAD customers in Washington, Oregon and Alaska beginning in October. Representatives include Charlie Soffel, Steve Silcock and Paul Amos. Contact information is as follows:

Charlie Soffel    206-619-0163     charlie@harperwinn.com

Steve Silcock    425-220-1190     steve@harperwinn.com

Paul Amos        503-481-5867     paul@harperwinn.com

“Hiring these firms to represent Petersen is one way we’re addressing the growing demand for PAC-CLAD products in the Western United States. We know these reps will satisfy the architectural metal needs of Petersen’s many existing and new customers in the area,” said David Hedrick, regional manager of Petersen’s Phoenix location.

For more information, visit www.pac-clad.com.

Metal Tiles Help Modernize Texas Bank’s Building and Brand

The design for the bank’s exterior incorporates metal tiles from Petersen to clad the building’s two entrances. A standing seam metal roof wraps around the building, intersecting with the metal tile. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

When Southside Bank in Texas began a campaign to modernize its brand, management understood that the buildings it occupies play a significant role in branding. The existing flagship branch in Tyler, Texas, was re-imagined and renovated inside and out to reflect the contemporary way the bank now interacts with its customers.

Architect Chad Humphries AIA, RID, project architect and partner, Fitzpatrick Architects in Tyler, Texas, extracted the vision for the renovation from the Southside team and created the bank’s signature design element using metal tiles from Petersen to clad the building’s two entrances. A standing seam metal roof wrapped around the building, and intersected with the metal tile at the entrances.

Humphries specified 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roof panels in 22-gauge steel finished in PAC-CLAD Slate Gray color. Also specified was 2,000 square feet of Petersen’s Precision Series TS Tile in .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze. Additionally, 500 square feet of Petersen’s composite rain screen in Classic Bronze finish was installed.

The building was topped with 10,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad roof panels in 22-gauge steel. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

“The tiles were the main design element we wanted on the entryways, to function as both wall and roof material, to blur the line between roof and wall,” Humphries says. “Metal tiles have been around in Europe for centuries, and we employed the PAC-CLAD Precision Series TS Tile as a modern option. Metal has a timelessness that is appealing, and in this project it achieved the aesthetic vision and performance needs we established.”

The tile concept on the entryways was such a success on this project that it will be duplicated on many other Southside Bank buildings. Humphries likes the metal tile’s low profile and the way it also adds texture to the wall. “I especially like the way the light interacts on the tile’s surface, which allows for a wall that changes its appearance as the sun progresses across the sky throughout the day,” he says.

When selecting products for any project, Humphries values how long a product has been on the market. “Even though the Precision Series TS Tile hasn’t been around a long time, it was Petersen’s version of a product with proven history and that was good enough for us,” he notes.

Design Challenges

Where the tile on the entryways met the standing seam roof, a junction not often encountered was created. The tile-to-panel junction was easy to deal with because ultimately it was a simple metal-to-metal joint, according to Humphries. “Additionally, the tile allowed for a 45-degree turn without requiring edge band,” he says.

A metal roof was chosen because of metal’s longevity, and the need to blend in to the building’s design, notes Humphries, who typically specifies some kind of metal element on every project. Design challenges included peeling back and sorting through the multiple phases of additions and renovations inside and outside of the building, ultimately to be truer to the original design of the building. “For example, in the 1970s they added a concrete superstructure. But in the 90s, rather than removing it, they built a giant green mansard roof over it. Over time the building’s design became a mixture of ideas with no clear vision in mind. Our job was to simplify and unify everything,” he explains.

Approximately 2,000 square feet of Petersen’s Precision Series TS Tile in .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze were installed. Photo: Tom Coplen, buenavistaphotography.com

This project was the first one for installing contractor Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal in Longview, Texas, on which metal tile was involved, says Anthony McKinley, vice president, estimator and project manager. “The tiles tied into a valley with the existing roof, so we made sure they were cut properly and flanged,” he says. “Installation of the tile and standing seam roof was straightforward for our experienced crew. It was a slower process working with the tiles because we wanted to make sure the lines were straight, level and square. The details were custom so we took a little longer to make sure we measured correctly and got it looking right.”

All metal work on the building was performed by McKinley’s team. “This job was large in scope mainly because of the removal and replacement of the mansard roofing,” McKinley says. “After taking off the roof panels, we removed fake dormers to create a straight, plain look. We tore everything down to the wood deck. Ultimately, we were at least six months on the jobsite. Most of our time was spent removing the existing metal, which required a man lift, which is a slow process.”

“We felt it was important to make sure the owner and architect liked what we were doing by not making design decisions on our own,” McKinley says. “Some jobs you know what to do, but on this one we wanted to make sure the architect liked it. We figured out details to make it work for integrity and water intrusion, but also to give the architect the look he wanted. We figured out the details on our own because those typically aren’t specified.” Edge metal was fabricated by McKinley’s crew. “We love working with PAC-CLAD,” McKinley says. “They have superior products, and the technical help Petersen provides is very valuable.”

TEAM

Architect: Fitzpatrick Architects in Tyler, Texas, https://fitzpatrickarchitects.com

Roofing Contractor: Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal, Longview, Texas, www.curtismckinleyroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: Snap-Clad 22-gauge steel finished in PAC-CLAD Slate Gray color, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Metal Tiles: Precision Series TS Tile, .023 aluminum finished in anodized dark bronze, Petersen

Colorful Exterior for Veterinary Hospital Comes Together Without a Hitch

The Kimbrough Animal Hospital in Longview, Texas, features a colorful exterior constructed of metal roof and wall panels. Photos: Petersen

Kimbrough Animal Hospital in Longview, Texas, is designed to provide top-notch care for its furry patients. The building includes surgical suites, treatment areas, and an in-house lab, as well as boarding and grooming facilities.

The state-of-the-art facility is housed in a striking complex highlighted by colorful metal roof and wall panels. It was a complicated new construction project on a tight jobsite, but experience and planning made for a smooth, textbook execution.

Complicated projects are nothing new for Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal. Headquartered in Longview, Texas, the company has been in business for 33 years and does a variety of commercial, industrial and residential work, including modified bitumen, built-up, single-ply and shingle roofs, as well as metal roofing and sheet metal fabrication. “We did all the metal on the project,” says Anthony McKinley, vice president of Curtis-McKinley. “We did the roof, the walls and soffit.”

McKinley was confident his crews could execute the project smoothly, and his confidence was bolstered by his experience working on other projects with the general contractor, Transet Company, and the manufacturer of the roof and wall panels, Petersen.

“We have a good relationship with Transet Company and we’ve done so much work with Petersen that they know our company and our guys,” McKinley says. “If there are any technical questions, they are very quick to help and get us answers, and inspections go great.”

The Roof and Walls

The roof and wall panels were manufactured from 24-gauge steel. The roof was covered with approximately 18,000 square feet of 18-inch PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Charcoal. The exterior also incorporates 4,400 square feet of 16-inch HWP panels in Slate Gray and 5,250 square feet of 12-inch Flush Panels in three colors: Slate Gray, Teal and Berkshire Blue.

The roof is comprised of Petersen’s 18-inch PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Charcoal. Photos: Petersen

Crews from Curtis-McKinley dried the roof in with TAMKO’s TW Metal and Tile self-adhered underlayment and tackled different phases of the project as the building came together. “We kind of did it all at one time,” McKinley recalls. “First, we had a roofing crew come out and put the peel-and-stick on the roof, and we measured for the roof panels. Then we started installing all of the trim and had a few guys start installing the wall panels.”

Petersen fabricated and delivered the wall panels, which were installed over plywood and cinder block walls using a man lift. On the cinder block walls, hat channels were installed to receive the clips. At two entrances, the Flush Panels were installed vertically. “We also installed regular flush soffit panels,” notes McKinley.

A representative from Petersen roll-formed the roof panels on the site. Some of the panels were more than 50 feet long, and this posed some logistical problems. “It was a very tight construction site,” McKinley explains. “We ran the panels on site and we had to lift them up with a crane. We couldn’t use a lift because there was no way to turn the lift around when the panels were loaded. There was one long driveway down one side, and we had to stack all of the panels in one direction and lift them straight up.”

Panels were lifted using a spreader bar as a cradle. “We strapped the panels to the spreader bar,” McKinley notes. “We only lifted about 10 panels at a time and our guys would receive them and stack them at points along the roof. We had about six or seven guys on the roof and the rest of the crew on the ground to strap down the panels.”

The walls feature Petersen’s 24-gauge HWP and Flush Panels in multiple colors, including Slate Gray, Teal and Berkshire Blue. Photos: Petersen

The crew started installing panels on the main roof and finished roof sections alongside the structure as the job progressed. Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time, using temporary anchor points screwed into in the deck. “We started off on the main roof area and worked our way from the back to the front,” McKinley recalls. “The shed roofs were incorporated as we worked our way forward.”

While the main crew worked on the roof, a smaller group sometimes split off to install the wall panels. “We had a crew with a few extra sheet metal guys on it, and we moved them around as needed,” McKinley notes. “That way they could start on the walls as the roof progressed and the job wouldn’t lag on.”

Planning Ahead

The main challenge on the project was the tight jobsite, according to McKinley. “It was a very limited site,” McKinley says. “Once we got the roof panels on, we could breathe a little easier.”

Despite the cramped conditions, communication between the crews kept conflicts to a minimum. “Working with other trades went fine,” McKinley says. “The superintendent on the site was easy to work with. We worked with other subcontractors in Longview we’ve worked with plenty of times. Our guys knew their guys, basically, and they just coordinate well and work around each other as needed.”

The project moved along smoothly and stayed on schedule. “We were blessed not to have any big weather delays,” McKinley says. “When they were ready for us, we were able to get right out there and move things along in a timely manner.”

McKinley also credits the manufacturer for help executing the project. “There are four or five different colors on it,” he says. “Each entrance was a different color, and the walls and roof. That was pretty interesting. Keeping it all straight with the guys was a challenge.”

Again, planning ahead was essential. “It just took a little more communication,” McKinley says. “When we were making our trim, we just had to make sure it was the right color. It’s very easy to work with Petersen. On a job like this one, the technical aspect of it was really very simple, but seeing all of the different colors on this project come together was pretty cool.”

Curtis-McKinley crew members were able to execute all of the transition details themselves as they installed the roof and wall panels. “They were all standard details, really,” McKinley says. “Almost all of the transitions were something the guys have done hundreds of times.”

Exceptions included the large, irregularly shaped windows at the entryways, which were trimmed in red. “There were two entrances with windows that were a little different,” McKinley says. “One set had a sort of triangular shape, which was pretty straightforward to flash. The other had a circular window, and that took a lot of time and coordination with the window people to ensure that we got it watertight with the flashing. Getting the trim for that wall custom made and fitting perfectly was a bit of a challenge.”

Taking a complicated project and making it look easy is one of the strengths of Curtis-McKinley Roofing. “The key is having the right guys,” McKinley says. “We are blessed to have very experienced professional roofers and sheet metal installers. Our sheet metal guys have done this for years. That’s getting harder to find these days, and we still have some older guys that know how to do it. They’ve done so much of it that I often rely on them to tell me, ‘This is how it needs to be done,’ or ‘This is a better way to do it.’ Then we just make sure everything conforms to the plans and specifications, and we ensure the installation integrity. Obviously the most important thing is to keep the water out.”

TEAM

Architect: Ron Mabry Architects, Tyler, Texas, www.ronmabryarchitects.com

General Contractor: Transet Co., Longview, Texas, www.transetco.com

Roofing Contractor: Curtis-McKinley Roofing and Sheet Metal, Longview, Texas, www.curtismckinleyroofing.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: 18-inch, 24-gauge PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad in Charcoal, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

Wall Panels: 16-inch, 24-gauge HWP, Slate Gray and 12-inch, 24-gauge Flush Panel in Slate Gray, Teal, and Berkshire Blue, Petersen

Underlayment: TW Metal and Tile, TAMKO, www.tamko.com

South Carolina Resort’s Metal Roof Complements Classic Low Country Architecture

The new Inn at Palmetto Bluff was inspired by a mansion built on the property in the early 1900s. Photos: Nurnberg Photography, www.nurnbergphotography.com

The recently expanded Palmetto Bluff Resort in Bluffton, South Carolina, now boasts a new 74-room inn designed by Dallas-based HKS Architects. The new Inn at Palmetto Bluff sits alongside an expanded lagoon waterway and was inspired by the R.T. Wilson Jr. mansion built on the property in the early 1900s. Located in the Low Country between Charleston and Savannah, Palmetto Bluff is one of the largest waterfront properties on the East Coast. The resort is set within the 20,000-acre Palmetto Bluff community and conservation preserve that features an array of Southern-style residential neighborhoods ranging from multi-million-dollar legacy family compounds to more traditionally sized single-family homes.

The inn is finished with artisan James Hardie siding on the exterior façade, and a Petersen standing seam metal roof was chosen to complement the classic Low Country architecture. The roof features PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels finished in custom color Patrician Bronze. Approximately 75,000 square feet of the 24-gauge Galvalume panels were installed on a tight deadline.

Don Harrier, principal at HKS, said one of the greatest challenges was complying with a long list of restrictions designed to keep additions within the scope of the original buildings, such as a mandated three-story height limit and rules regarding waterways.

The inn is topped with a standing seam metal roof featuring Petersen’s PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels. Photos: Nurnberg Photography, www.nurnbergphotography.com

“It’s easy to get into a site like this for construction, but in our world we have staging areas for materials, contractor trailers, etc., and because of the environment, we had to build another building first to house back-of-the-house areas, maintenance, administration and parking,” Harrier says. “There were a lot of logistics involved as far as taking care of the site.”

Installation of the Snap-Clad panels on the 154,000-square-foot luxury inn was done by Southern Roof & Wood Care in Hardeeville, South Carolina. “It was a complicated job with three adjoining sections of the roof and lots of different elevations and planes and dormers. The flashing details were complex,” says David Swanson, president of SRWC.

Southern Roof & Wood Care has considerable experience with Petersen’s PAC-CLAD profiles. “We like Snap-Clad because it doesn’t require mechanical seaming. We use it whenever we can and when it meets the wind uplift requirements,” Swanson notes. “Of course, we also install a lot of Tite-Loc and Tite-Loc Plus, too. We like using the PAC-CLAD products and we can be competitive in the marketplace. We’re really happy with the Petersen relationship. They stand behind their products.”

The Snap-Clad panels were manufactured at Petersen’s plant in Acworth, Georgia. The general contractor was Choate Construction in Savannah, Georgia. The Petersen distributor was Commercial Roofing Specialties in Savannah, Georgia.

TEAM

Architect: HKS Architects, Dallas, Texas, www.hksinc.com

General Contractor: Choate Construction, Savannah, www.choateco.com

Roofing Contractor: Southern Roof & Wood Care, Hardeeville, South Carolina, www.southernroof.com

Distributor: Commercial Roofing Specialties, Savannah, Georgia, www.crssupply.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: PAC-CLAD Snap-Clad panels in Patrician Bronze, Petersen, www.pac-clad.com

MSCI Bestows Lifetime Achievement Award on Petersen’s John Palesny

The Metals Service Center Institute bestowed its Lifetime Achievement Award on John Palesny, president of Petersen Aluminum Corp., in late November during its Aluminum Products Division Conference in Florida. The honor recognizes Palesny’s contribution to the metals industry during his 47-year career at Petersen, headquartered in Elk Grove Village, Illinois.

The Metals Service Center Institute is a trade association in Mt. Prospect, Illinois, representing metals producers, distributors and processors. MSCI provides its members with knowledge, thought leadership, data, education, industry advocacy, and a forum for debate, discussion and learning.

“I am honored to accept this award on behalf of all my colleagues at Petersen,” Palesny said. “Together we have built a great company that is recognized as an industry leader. So, it’s not really about me, it’s about the people who have made this company such a remarkable success and a joy to work with.”

Palesny said his approach to management has been to be hands-on while allowing people to do their work with the least amount of supervision. “I learned early in my career that it was critical to build a great team, set the goals and then let them have the necessary freedom to deliver,” he said. 

Palesny’s successes have not been achieved without challenges. “The biggest challenge in my career is keeping an eye on the competition and how we stack up against them on quality, service and product development. I think about that all the time.”

The list of people who previously won this award is filled with influential figures in the metals industry, said Robert Weidner III, CAE, president and CEO of MSCI. “These winners are iconic leaders. Their contributions within their respective companies, our industry and the communities within which they live are marked by their integrity, passion for metals and manufacturing, and empathy for others.”

The Roman god Janus was chosen as the symbol for the award for his ability to both reflect on the past and look toward the future, Weidner said. “John embodies the principles of Janus through his ability to look over the horizon to see what is coming and determine how the metals industry should respond. John is also able to reflect of the past and build on success.”

John Palesny is a true believer in the mission of the MSCI, said Mike Palesny, vice president of Petersen, and John’s brother. “John recognizes the value that MSCI brings to our industry, and has always been a cheerleader for the missions it champions. In more specific terms, John has supported the MSCI and its predecessor the National Association of Aluminum Distributors for a number of years with his time, expertise and wisdom.”

Volunteer leadership positions John Palesny has held includes president of the Chicago chapter of the former National Association of Aluminum Distributors, chair of MSCI’s aluminum division, and a term on the MSCI executive board. He also served on multiple committees and supporting groups in his career.

While John Palesny was a volunteer leader at MSCI, he embraced the concept of making MSCI greater than it was when he began, Weidner recalled. “He has a calling for giving back to the metals community. Right now the MSCI delegate level at our recently held conference was the highest it has been since 2004. I maintain that this is mostly because of the foundation for success John laid when he was in a leadership position during the recession. John’s approach to helping MSCI see itself through some of the most challenging issues has been collaborative and strategic for the good of the metals community.”

John was chair of the aluminum council when the recession began in 2008, Weidner recalled. “As it was ending, I remember John saying, ‘OK, this recession was bad and it took its toll on all of us, but the MSCI aluminum group members are not going to allow a recession to set this organization back.’ John worked in an unrelenting manner to be sure that companies in the aluminum industry had that same attitude. He said, ‘This group has been important and I’m going to put more sweat equity into helping MSCI and the industry get back to the level it was at before the recession hit.’”

John Palesny began his career at Petersen in 1970. “Over a 47-year span he rose from a warehouse position to become president of the firm. Over that time he was able to build annual sales from $3 million to its present day level of $170 million,” said Mike Petersen, CEO.

During his career, John Palesny has been a critically important counselor regarding every major decision that Petersen has faced, Mike Palesny said. “I believe the entire management group of the company would agree that John’s counsel and advice was invariably ‘spot on’ and helped PAC grow into the successful company and industry leader that it is today.”

“John possesses the rare combination of ‘book smarts’ and common sense. In my opinion, he’s the smartest businessman I have ever known,” Mike Palesny continued. “Furthermore, he’s an exceptionally good person with a true moral compass of what is right and what it wrong. He has used that internal compass to guide him in his dealings with customers, vendors and his fellow employees. I am proud of my brother John and sincerely thank him for his hard work both on behalf of PAC and MSCI. He has taught me many things through the years, and it’s my honor to work beside him.”

Mike Petersen feels similarly. “I am most fortunate to have had John as a co-worker and mentor for more than 40 years, and am proud to see his accomplishments recognized by the industry with this Lifetime Achievement Award.”

For more information, visit www.pac-clad.com.

Carlisle Companies to Acquire Petersen Aluminum Corporation

Carlisle Companies Incorporated, through its Carlisle Construction Materials (CCM) operating segment, announced that it has entered into a definitive purchase agreement to acquire Petersen Aluminum Corporation for approximately $197 million. 

Headquartered in Elk Grove Village, Illinois, Petersen’s primary business is the manufacture and distribution of architectural metal roof panels, steel and aluminum flat sheets and coils, wall panels, perimeter roof edge systems and related accessories for commercial, residential, institutional, industrial and agricultural markets. Founded by Maurice R. Petersen in 1965, Petersen, through its premier brand PAC-CLAD, has grown to become a company with approximately $160 million of annual revenue. 

Chris Koch, CEO and president of Carlisle Companies, said, “The acquisition of Petersen is part of our strategy of providing customers with a portfolio of high quality, innovative products and solutions that meet an increasing array of their building envelope needs. Petersen is an excellent fit with our recent acquisitions in the metal roofing space, including Drexel Metals, Sunlast Metal and Premium Panels, as well as a significant complementary addition to our single-ply roofing systems. We anticipate achieving annual synergies of $4.0 million across our metal roofing platform as a result of the acquisition. Petersen further broadens our scale and geographic penetration of the attractive and fast growing regions of Texas, Arizona, Georgia and the Midwest as we continue to execute on our metal roofing growth strategy. I look forward to welcoming the Petersen team to Carlisle and driving further growth and innovation with the help of the Carlisle Operating System.” 

Upon completion of the transaction, the business will be reported as part of the CCM segment. 

For more information, visit www.carlisle.com