Ashland Reveals New Corporate Identity and Organizational Culture

Ashland took another step in its plan for the future, revealing its “Always Solving” corporate identity and unveiling the organizational culture that will continue to differentiate the company as it continues its mission.

“We’ve been on a journey since announcing plans to separate Valvoline and Ashland into two standalone companies,” says Bill Wulfsohn, Ashland chairman and chief executive officer. “Today, both companies are positioned for bright futures.”

Along with his leadership team, Wulfsohn developed a strategy which empowers each of Ashland’s chemical businesses to develop its own strategic approach as to where to compete and how to win in their marketplace. Each will employ its own core competencies in problem-solving that brings value to customers. Together as one global team, Ashland will build an organization focused on innovation, operations, and capital deployment. Its foundation will continue to be built on operations. Ashland will continue fostering growth through innovations and sales opportunities, and continue capturing value delivered to customers while driving cost competitiveness.

The most public facing element of the evolution of Ashland, is its new corporate identity – Always Solving – which reflects the company’s positioning and people across diverse industries as broad as pharmaceuticals to automotive, personal care to paints, adhesives to biofunctionals, and more.

“Now is the time for Ashland to communicate the nature of who we are and what sets our employees apart. We’re a company of solvers who develop solutions to complex problems in applied chemistry, pushing the boundaries of what’s possible, and advancing the competitiveness of our customers across industries,” states Carolmarie Brown, Ashland director global marketing and business communications.

The positioning illustrates how Ashland acts as a partner to its customers, providing solutions that bring value to its business partners. In particular, the company is focused on innovations for growing market positions in segments such as pharmaceuticals, personal care and paints and coatings.

Today and moving forward, Ashland embodies how its people are distinguished by their ability to apply specialized chemistry with a disciplined approach that increases the efficacy, refines the usability, adds to the allure, ensures the integrity, and improves the profitability of their customers’ products and applications. Each of these qualities are manifested in different ways for different industries, and together, its people around the globe are always solving, to improve customers’ products. “In Ashland we bring together different backgrounds, different disciplines, different points of view, and we operate as one team with a sense of purpose,” said Luis Fernandez-Moreno, senior vice president of Ashland and president of the Chemicals Group.

Along with its strategy and identity is the articulation and implementation of a collective Ashland Way, its corporate culture, which is “to respect, protect, and advance the people we work with, companies we serve, shareholders who invest in our future, communities we’re a part of, and the planet we share.”

The Ashland Way will drive business growth and shape an organization of which employees will want to be a part. Values of safety, integrity, partnership and passion will guide behavior each day.

“We have a common understanding of how we operate, think, manage, encourage and act in order to build an organization and improve the world through solutions based on the application of specialty ingredients and materials,” Wulfsohn says.

Ashland has a focus on operations and has been committed to doing business with integrity and respect for all people and the world. The company has made formal commitments to improve the environmental, health, safety and security performance for facilities, processes and products throughout the entire operating system. Forty-six Ashland sites have received Responsible Care certification, including three facilities earlier this year.

The Qualities of a Top-performing Shingle

Shingle product development has generally been slow compared to technology evolution in other industries. The most important performance requirements of asphalt shingles, like shedding water, fire and wind resistance, durability and code compliance, have been established for decades. Within the past 35 years, though, there has been a push to develop additional performance standards for asphalt shingles.

The current (and long-standing) product standard for fiberglass asphalt shingles is ASTM D3462. This standard focuses on the physical performance measures of shingles at the time of manufacturing. A number of areas tested include the “recipe” of the shingle (glass mat, adhesive, finished weight, etc.) and performance requirements, such as tear strength, behavior on heating, fastener pull-through resistance (the force needed to pull a nail through the shingle at high and low temperatures), and penetration and softening point of the asphalt.

However, some manufacturers have fought to raise the performance requirements that shingles must meet. Rather than focusing on performance at the time of manufacture, these manufacturers want to establish a standard that would reflect how shingles perform over time. In 2011, the ICC Evaluation Service, Brea, Calif., approved a new alternative acceptance criterion for asphalt shingles, AC438. Instead of dictating how to make an asphalt shingle (what raw materials to use), it requires additional physical property and performance testing beyond ASTM D3462.

AC438 contains stringent performance testing requirements, which are meant to evaluate the performance of a shingle over time. “When thinking about shingle performance, it’s imperative we, as an industry, are looking not just at performance at the time of manufacture. AC438 helps test in these extreme environments to give us better insight,” says Emily Videtto, vice president of shingles and new product development at GAF, Parsippany, N.J. The shingles are put through three critical, demanding tests to evaluate durability in a variety of temperatures and weather situations:

  • Temperature cycling. This looks at long-term extreme-temperature resistance—how shingles can withstand winter cold or summer heat. The tests occur in 12- to 24-hour cycles, so it takes 12 days to put the shingle through extreme high and extreme low temperatures. The low temperature is done after soaking in water. Under five times magnification, the shingles are inspected for signs of tearing or cracking that show the glass mat, butt joints in the first course and no separations greater than 1/4 inch, and no evidence of tearing around fasteners or pull through. If any of these conditions exist, the material fails the test.
  • Weather resistance. This test looks at how shingles perform after long-term exposure to the sun. Using ASTM G155, a Xenon Arc weatherometer that tests for accelerated weathering, shingles are subjected to 2,000 hours of light and water in cycles for 83 days. After that’s complete, there is a visual examination for evidence of surfacing loss, erosion or exposed reinforcement. Shingle samples must have a minimum of 80 percent of their original breaking strength to pass this stringent test.
  • Wind-driven rain. This determines how shingles stand up to heavy, driving rain. The shingles are tested under Florida Building Code Test Protocol TAS-100 with the minimum slope specified by the manufacturer. No water should infiltrate through the sheathing and there should be no blow-off, tear-off or release of the shingle (or any portion of it). The test subjects the shingles to 15 minutes of wind and water, then 10 minutes off, then back on again with wind speeds going to 35, 70, 90 and 110 mph. This results in 8 inches per hour of rain to test the shingle’s performance. A camera is mounted on the underside to look for any water intrusion during the test.

AC438 also looks at the weight of the displaced surfacing over the asphalt coating. With ASTM D3462, the requirement is one gram of granule loss. AC438 requires less displaced surfacing, so more granules need to be kept on the surface of the shingle to better protect it.

These additional tests challenge shingle manufacturers to make a better-quality product to meet the requirements found in AC438. GAF was the first shingle manufacturer to provide independent verification to the requirements of AC438 and additional manufacturers have since followed. These tests are a big step forward in evaluating performance and choosing a shingle that has the qualities to stand the test of weather and time. This type of testing ultimately helps roofing contractors because they want to know that the shingles they are installing will pass these stringent tests and provide stronger protection against the elements. For homeowners, they can feel comfortable they are installing a top-performing shingle that will help protect their most valuable asset.

Today, all GAF shingles comply with ASTM D3462 and AC438, as well as pass the industry’s two toughest wind-resistance tests: ASTM D3161, Class F (110 mph), and ASTM D7158, Class H (150 mph). These code advancements and stronger tests have helped to change the manufacturing of roofing shingles from an art to a science. This science comes through years of research, lab testing, and development to find the right mix of materials and production processes to produce a technologically advanced shingle. In fact, GAF created its own shingle science with Advanced Protection Shingle Technology, aimed at pushing the envelope to deliver shingles with the most advanced design, manufacturing, and testing techniques for quality and longevity in an asphalt shingle.

Insulation Types, Application Methods and Physical Characteristics Must Be Reviewed, Understood and Selected to Ensure Roof System Performance

Designing and constructing roof systems (see my previous articles about roof decks, substrate boards and vapor barriers) continues with the thermal insulation layer. The governing building codes will dictate the minimum R-value required and, based on the R-value of the selected insulation, the thickness of required insulation can be determined. This plays into the design of the roof edge, which will be the subject of future articles. For now, let’s focus on insulation.

Photo 1: Polyisocyanurate (ISO) with organic facers

Photo 1: Polyisocyanurate
(ISO) with organic facers

Thermal insulation has multiple purposes, including to:

    ▪▪ Provide an appropriate surface on which the roof cover can be placed.
    ▪▪ Assist in providing interior user comfort.
    ▪▪ Assist in uplift performance of the roof system.
    ▪▪ Provide support for rooftop activities.
    ▪▪ Keep the cool air in during the summer and out during the winter, resulting in energy savings.

INSULATION OPTIONS

For the designer, there are numerous insulation material choices, each with its own positive and negative characteristics. Today’s insulation options are:

    ▪▪ Polyisocyanurate (ISO)

  • »» Varying densities
  • »» Organic facers (see photos 1 and 2)
  • »» Double-coated fiberglass facers (see photo 3)
  • ▪▪ Expanded polystyrene (XPS) (see photo 4)

  • »» Varying densities
  • ▪▪ Extruded polystyrene (EPS) (see photo 5)

  • »» Varying densities
  • ▪▪ Mineral wool (see photo 6)

  • »» Varying densities
  • ▪▪ Perlite
    ▪▪ High-density wood fiber

With today’s codes, the use of perlite and high-density wood fiber as primary roof insulation is very limited. The R-value per inch and overall cost is prohibitive.

Some attributes of the more commonly used insulation types are:
POLYISOCYANURATE

Photo 2: Polyisocyanurate (ISO) with organic facers

Photo 2: Polyisocyanurate
(ISO) with organic facers

    ▪▪ Predominate roof insulation in the market
    ▪▪ Organic and double-coated fiberglass facers (mold-resistant)
    ▪▪ Varying densities available: 18 to 25 psi, nominal and minimum, as well as 80 to 125 psi high-density cover boards
    ▪▪ Has an allowable dimensional change, per the ASTM standard, that needs to be understood and designed for
    ▪▪ Can be secured via mechanical fasteners or installed in hot asphalt and/or polyurethane foam adhesive: bead and full-coverage spray foam
    ▪▪ Has an R-value just under 6.0 per inch but has some downward drifting over time

EXPANDED POLYSTYRENE (EPS)

    ▪▪ Has good moisture resistance but can accumulate moisture
    ▪▪ Direct application to steel decks is often a concern with fire resistance
    ▪▪ Has varying densities: 1.0 to 3.0 pound per cubic foot
    ▪▪ Very difficult to install in hot asphalt; basically not appropriate
    ▪▪ Certain products can be secured with mechanical fasteners or lowrise foam adhesive
    ▪▪ Has stable R-values: 3.1 to 4.3 per inch based upon classification type

EXTRUDED POLYSTYRENE (XPS)

    ▪▪ Has good moisture resistance and is often used in protected roof membrane systems and plaza deck applications
    ▪▪ Direct application to steel decks is often a concern with fire resistance
    ▪▪ Has varying compressive strengths: 20 to 100 psi
    ▪▪ Not appropriate to be installed in hot asphalt
    ▪▪ Has stable R-values: 3.9 to 5 per inch based on classification type

MINERAL WOOL

    ▪▪ Outstanding fire resistance
    ▪▪ Stable thermal R-value: 4.0 per inch
    ▪▪ No dimensional change in thickness or width over time
    ▪▪ Available in differing densities
    ▪▪ May absorb and release moisture
    ▪▪ Can be installed in hot asphalt or mechanically attached

PHOTOS: HUTCHINSON DESIGN GROUP LTD.

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