School Board’s Kite-Shaped Building Reflects Location’s History

The roof design for the Homewood Board of Education Central

The roof design for the Homewood Board of Education Central Office was inspired by the site, which is known as Kite Hill. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The new home for the Homewood Board of Education Central Office in Alabama is a 14,500-square-foot modern structure that marks the first phase of a long-term development plan on a 24-acre site in Homewood, Ala., a suburb of Birmingham.

The contemporary structure was designed by Williams Blackstock Architects in Birmingham. “The roof design was inspired by the site, which is known as Kite Hill,” says architect Kyle Kirkwood. “It’s a spot where kids and parents come to fly kites. The roof, which slopes in two different directions and is kite-like in its appearance, is representative of the popular site.”

The building was conceived as a “garden pavilion” integrated within the site, intended to mediate between public and private property, and man-made and natural materials. The structure is nestled into a line of pine trees with a cantilevered roof extending just beyond the pines.

The design incorporates approximately 24,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD material in four different profiles. The main roof includes 16,000 square feet of Petersen’s Snap-Clad panels up to 60 feet long. The design also incorporates an interior application of the Flush panels by integrating them into the lobby area. In addition, 7,000 square feet of Flush panels were used in soffit applications. The panels were manufactured at Petersen’s Acworth, Ga., plant.

The roof design was complex, Kirkwood notes. “Since the roof slopes in two directions, we had an interesting valley situation where we had to coordinate the orientation of the seams,” Kirkwood said.

Challenging Installation

The roof also features two rectangular low-slope sections that were covered with a TPO system manufactured by Firestone Building Products. The roof systems were installed by Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing in Birmingham, which specializes in commercial roofing, primarily architectural metal and single-ply projects.

The building is nestled into a line of pine tree

The building is nestled into a line of pine trees near the edge of the site, adjacent to a residential area. The cantilevered roof was designed to help the structure blend in with the location and mediate between public and private property. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Eddie Still, Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing’s vice president, helped prepare the budget for Brasfield and Gorrie, the construction manager on the project, so Still was prepared to go when his bid was accepted. “It was a job that consisted of a large portion of metal and a smaller portion of TPO,” he says. “Since we do both things, we were a good fit.”

The installation was made event tougher by the logistics of the site, according to Still. “The design of the metal roof was unusual, to say the least,” he says. “It had a valley that cut through it, and the panels were sloped in two directions. That’s not normally the case.”

The biggest obstacle was posed by the building’s location on a hill near the edge of the property line, immediately adjacent to a residential neighborhood. “The Snap-Clad panels were approximately 60 feet long, which isn’t a problem if you have the equipment to handle them,” Still notes. “It does pose a problem logistically when it comes to getting them into a tight area, and we definitely had that.”

Panels were trailered in and hoisted to the roof by a crane. “Once the panels were up there, the installation was fairly easy,” Still says. “The roof didn’t have a lot of changes in elevation or different plateaus built into it. The only quirky thing was that valley, and once you had that squared away, you were good to go.”

Coordinating penetrations with members of plumbing and HVAC trades is critical, according to Still. “On the metal roofs, we always stress that you’re trying to present an aesthetic picture for the building, so you want to minimize the penetrations so it looks cleaner,” he says. “You have to coordinate on site so if you have a plumbing exhaust stack, it comes up in the center of the pan and not on the seam.”

The metal roof incorporates approximately 24,000

The metal roof incorporates approximately 24,000 square feet of Petersen’s PAC-CLAD material in four different profiles. In addition, 7,000 square feet of Flush panels were used in soffit applications. Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

A small section of metal roof near the entryway was made up of mechanically seamed panels. “The reason we used Tite-Loc panels on that portion of the roof was because of the low slope,” Still says. “We used the same width panel, so it looks identical, but the seams are different. They are designed to work on systems with slopes as low as ½:12.”

Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing also installed the Firestone self-adhered TPO roof system on two low-slope sections of the roof, totaling approximately 3,000 square feet.

Still looks back on the completed project with pride. “Our niche would be a building like this one, which has TPO or some other membrane roofing and metal,” he says. “We’ve been in business 33 years. We have a well-deserved reputation for the type of work we do. In the bid market things are price driven, so more often than not, price is the determining factor. But in larger projects and work that’s negotiated, the G.C. is going to opt to choose people to solicit pricing from who have a history of doing successful projects with them.”

TEAM

Architect: Williams Blackstock Architects, Birmingham, Ala., Wba-architects.com
Construction Manager: Brasfield and Gorrie, Birmingham, Brasfieldgorrie.com
General Contractor: WAR Construction Inc., Tuscaloosa, Ala., Warconstruction.com
Roofing Contractor: Quality Architectural Metal & Roofing Inc., Birmingham, Qualityarch.com
Metal Roof System Manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp., Pac-Clad.com
Low-Slope Roof Manufacturer: Firestone Building Products, FirestoneBPCO.com

Petersen to Open PAC-CLAD Manufacturing Facility in Phoenix

Petersen is expanding the reach of its trusted PAC-CLAD brand by opening a new manufacturing facility in Phoenix. The 52,000-square-foot facility is scheduled to be fully operational in the first quarter of 2018, and will be equipped to provide the Western U.S. construction market with the full line of PAC-CLAD steel and aluminum cladding products, including standing seam roof panels, hidden- and exposed-fastener wall panels, sheet, coil and more.
 
The expansion West provides a solution to growth challenges Petersen has faced, said Mike Petersen, CEO. “To date, we have been limited in our ability to effectively service customers in the Western United States, largely because of the challenges and high costs of transporting products from our Texas and Illinois facilities and over the Rocky Mountains. By opening this Phoenix facility, we’re creating a foundation on which to grow the PAC-CLAD brand into the West Coast market,” Petersen said.
 
The new facility will be managed by David Hedrick, whose background includes more than 15 years of management leadership in both the manufacturing and architectural metals industries. “I’m excited about joining the Petersen team and opening this new PAC-CLAD manufacturing facility. The Arizona PAC-CLAD team looks forward to providing the Western United States construction industry with the high-quality PAC-CLAD products and professional service the rest of the country has enjoyed for more than 50 years,” Hedrick said.
 
Petersen’s facility is located in existing commercial space south of downtown Phoenix. Questions and inquiries about the Phoenix facility can be directed via email to Rob Heselbarth at rheselbarth@petersenmail.com. The Phoenix location is the sixth for Petersen, joining the company’s other facilities in Elk Grove Village, Ill.; Acworth, Ga.; Tyler, Texas; Annapolis Junction, Md.; and Andover, Minn.

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Offices & Warehouses

Workforce Essentials, Clarksville, Tenn.

Team

Roofing and Wall Panel Installer: Modern Heating Cooling Roofing, Clarksville, (931) 647-0815
Architect: Lyle Cook Martin Architects, Clarksville
Metal Panel Distributor: Commercial Roofing Specialties Inc., Nashville, Tenn.

Workforce Essentials is a private, non-profit organization providing workforce development services for the Tennessee Department of Labor in a nine-county area.

Workforce Essentials is a private, non-profit organization providing workforce development services for the Tennessee Department of Labor in a nine-county area.

Roof Materials

To meet design objectives, four different PAC-CLAD products were selected. The roof uses 20,500 square feet of 16-inch, 24-gauge Silver Metallic Tite-Loc Plus panels. The façade features 7,800 square feet of Precision Series wall panels finished in Sierra Tan and installed vertically. Complementing the façade is 4,000 square feet of 12-inch Almond Flush panels installed as soffit. In addition, 4,520 square feet of 24-gauge Medium Bronze flat sheet was used for fascia and trim.

“The Tite-Loc Plus panels were long—85 feet—and were rollformed onsite,” says Bill Kimbrough Jr., estimator and project manager for Modern Heating Cooling Roofing. “Getting them up to the high roof was a challenge. All other profiles were fabricated and delivered by Petersen. Currently, PAC-CLAD is about the only product we use.”

Metal Panel Manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

The roof uses 20,500 square feet of 16-inch, 24-gauge Silver Metallic Tite-Loc Plus panels.

The roof uses 20,500 square feet of 16-inch, 24-gauge Silver Metallic Tite-Loc Plus panels.

Roof Report

Workforce Essentials is a private, non-profit organization providing workforce development services for the Tennessee Department of Labor in a nine-county area in the middle of the state. Located on a highly visible urban-infill site, the new Workforce Essentials headquarters and career training center is situated at a “gateway entry” intersection to the downtown district. The new 40,000-squarefoot facility consolidates services that had been provided at agency offices previously scattered around the city. After initially considering renovation of an aging building on the site, the organization’s board of directors determined that construction of a new, energy-efficient headquarters was a better course of action. Good visibility and an easily identifiable aesthetic were important to site selection and building design criteria.

Different departments within the building are visually and strategically defined in separate wings and entrances. The administrative office wing to the south is defined by a vertical brick corner tower and sloping metal roof planes and cladding. The larger career training center portion of the building is introduced by metal wall panels in a calming color palette of Sierra Tan. Thematic entry canopies, protruding aluminum sunshades and aligned horizontal fenestration tie together the architectural composition. The overriding idea is for the building to serve as a machine with different parts working together for a common purpose.

Brad Martin, principal/designer at Lyle Cook Martin Architects, explains: “Workforce Essentials has a variety of regional offices throughout the area it serves. All are different and very few are freestanding. The organization has never really had a corporate look or identity. Now, with this new building, we can incorporate its design features and architectural aesthetics into future new buildings and renovations and begin to develop an iconic look.”

Photos: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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Metal Roof and Wall Panels Provide Industrial Aesthetic to Texas Ranch

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof.

As many architects can attest, designing a residence for oneself can present challenges. But architect Jack Carson rose to the occasion by creating a striking design for his new home, located on a ranch in the beautiful Texas Hill Country. Design for the 7,000-square-foot residence follows LEED principles and blends a unique palette of “industrial” materials with ultra-modern aesthetics.

“The house is truly on a ranch. We have cattle on the property,” says Carson, president of Carson Design Associates in Austin, Texas. “We wanted to keep the design somewhat in the ranch vernacular but with a contemporary look. The reliance on metal for the roof and cladding and an exposed structure helped create a ranch building feel. We like to think of it as an ‘industrial ranch’ aesthetic.”

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed.

Several of Petersen Aluminum’s PAC-CLAD profiles contributed to Carson’s success in delivering the desired look. Nearly 13,000 square feet of Petersen’s Galvalume Snap-Clad panels was used to clad the roof. The 16-inch roof panels were rollformed onsite because of extremely tight site conditions and because the only access to the site was via a dirt road that wasn’t wide enough to allow large trucks to deliver factory-formed panels. An additional 3,000 square feet of Snap-Clad panels also was installed vertically as siding around two garages and at specific locations on the house as accent panels.

The primary wall panel profile utilized was Petersen’s Precision Series panels, of which 2,400 square feet of the 16-inch Galvalume material was installed. All wall panels were manufactured at Petersen’s Tyler, Texas, plant.

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.”

The onsite fabrication of the roof panels and the installation of all roof and wall panels was performed by Dean Contracting Co., Kyle, Texas. “The greatest challenge was executing the architects dream for his home,” recalls Jesse Brown, vice president of Dean Contracting. “The design included a myriad of varying geometric shapes on many different planes and a blend of materials that required complex detailing. It was probably one of the top-five most challenging jobs that we have ever done.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass. “We have great views into the valley with no neighbors,” Carson adds. “A large overhanging soffit covers a large portion of the deck and shades all of the glass.”

The underside of the overhanging soffit is clad with Ipe wood that ends with an edge that Carson and Brown describe as “the wing” or “the blade.” Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit. Petersen functioned as distributor of the Reynobond ACM.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

Fabricated with Alcoa Reynobond aluminum composite material (ACM), this transitional element smoothly links the standing-seam roof with the overhanging wood-clad soffit.

The decision to use Petersen for the roof and siding was arrived at rather easily. Carson notes: “I was familiar with PAC-CLAD and wanted to use it but also wanted to rely on the builder’s recommendations regarding materials and subcontractors. In our very first meeting with the roofer, Dean Contracting, they brought in samples of PAC-CLAD and recommended using it. That made the decision pretty easy.”

Carson is a big believer in metal as a roofing and cladding material. “We wanted to be as maintenance-free as possible. And sustainability was an important component as well,” Carson says. “We used LEED principles in our design. Metal is far greener than asphalt shingles and other alternatives. It’s just a great option for residential construction.”

The installation went smoothly, Carson adds, primarily because he relied on the expertise of Dean Contracting. “My approach is to listen to the experts. Jesse Brown and his crew worked out the complex detailing. They use metal all the time and are extremely capable. We collaborated as necessary but I basically left it in their hands.”

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

The Petersen profiles highlight the material palette, which also includes Texas limestone sourced directly from the property on which the home sits, Ipe wood, steel beams and a generous amount of glass.

Brown was quick to give full credit to the crew that was led by Juan Rojas, sheet-metal superintendent. Rojas is a 24-year employee of Dean Contracting and Brown cites Rojas’ attention to function and precise detailing as a main reason why the job turned out so well.

The house—in spite of its size and location in the hot Texas climate and the large amount of glass—is energy efficient. Two inches of rigid insulation was installed under the metal roof and an additional 4 inches of sprayed insulation went under the roof deck. “The heavy insulation and the shade provided by the overhang makes it very energy efficient. The house stays a very constant temperature,” Carson says.

The entire property captures rainwater in 18,000-gallon collection tanks, which is yet another reason for using metal, Carson points out.

When asked about the challenge of designing for yourself, Carson thought it was easier than designing for a traditional client. “I was probably more demanding in ‘getting it right’, but once I knew I had the right design and materials, I didn’t have to convince myself that it was the best direction. There was no negotiation or comprising the design in any way,” Carson says. “The biggest problem any architect has in designing for themselves is in ‘editing out.’ We know all of the possibilities, and being able to prioritize and filter out the unnecessary options is often the hardest challenge.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

A Metal Roof Crowns a Residential New-construction Project

When Charles Callaghan purchased the two vacant lots next to his home in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., he thought they would form the perfect location for his family’s dream home. A team comprised of architects, contractors and manufacturers worked together to bring his ideas to life in the form of a new 7,500-square-foot residence. The building’s crowning feature is a metal roof system that was designed to complement the aesthetics of the home and stand up to the harsh oceanfront environment for decades to come.

The roof of the Callaghan residence in Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla., features 12,000 square feet of Petersen Aluminum’s Snap-Clad in Slate Gray.

The roof of the Callaghan
residence in Ponte Vedra
Beach, Fla., features 12,000 square feet of Petersen Aluminum’s Snap-Clad in Slate Gray.

“With the larger lot, we thought we could do something unique to the neighborhood,” Callaghan says. “When we first met with the architect, there were a few keys we wanted to stress. First, we didn’t want a boxy-looking house. We also wanted shingle-style siding and a metal roof. We like the look of the metal roof, we like the durability, and we thought it would be a good way of complementing the shingles on the house.”

At every phase of the project, the team of construction professionals ensured the project was executed with precision, down to the last detail of the metal roof.

THE DESIGN

The house was designed by Jaycox Architects & Associates, Jacksonville, Fla. According to William R. Jaycox, principal, the plan made the backyard pool the home’s focal point. “They wanted to do a casual, shingle-style beach house that wasn’t like everyone else’s house,” Jaycox notes. “We designed the house so it was mostly single-story and spread it out around the pool, which made for an interesting roof design. It’s all in small modules.”

The L-shaped home features a master-bedroom suite on one side while the other side contains the living room, dining room, kitchen, family room and guest bedroom. “This one also has a four-car garage under the main roof, and, because the house wraps continuously around the pool, you get a fun little foyer in the front with a little cupola up above, you get the dormers for the bedrooms in the attic, and the master suite is a little pod unto itself,” Jaycox adds. “The back has a pool pavilion separate from the house. When you put all of those elements together, you get a very interesting structure, and the metal roof was perfect because it accentuates the lines.”

The roof system specified included 12,000 square feet of aluminum panels in the cool-color Slate Gray. “This house is only a few blocks from the ocean, and in those cases we typically use aluminum,” Jaycox says. “We’ve had great success with that system. It’s absolutely bombproof from a corrosion standpoint with stainless fasteners, heavy-gauge aluminum and the Kynar finish.”

Thorne Metal Systems installed a high-temperature, self-adhered underlayment beneath the metal roof, as specified.

Thorne Metal Systems installed a high-temperature, self-adhered underlayment beneath the metal roof, as specified.

When applied by a certified installer, the system can qualify for a 20-year Oceanfront Finish Warranty from the manufacturer. In addition, the roof meets all Florida’s tough building-code requirements. The system, consisting of 0.040-gauge aluminum, 16-inch-wide panels with fastening clips spaced at 24-inches on-center, carries a Miami-Dade NOA with a -110 PSF uplift. (The UL 90 uplift is -52.5 PSF.)

THE INSTALLATION

The roofing contractor on the project was Thorne Metal Systems of Middleburg, Fla. Owner Bill Thorne has been installing metal roofs since 1989. He formed his own company 13 years ago, and it has become the go-to metal roof installer for Jaycox Architects
& Associates and the general contractor on the project, C.F. Knight Inc., Jacksonville.

Thorne has a lot of experience installing this particular aluminum roof system. “The system is a very easy system to install,” he says. “It’s very user- friendly. The panels have male and female joints that snap together and are held in place with stainless-steel clips.”

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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Petersen Aluminum Celebrates 50 Years of Serving the Construction Industry

Petersen Aluminum Corp. is celebrating its 50th anniversary by honoring the first five decades of company history as it prepares for a bright future. Maurice “Maury” Petersen founded the company on Feb. 15, 1965 as an aluminum distributor in Chicago, then worked with his son Mike as the company grew to become one of the construction industry’s architectural metals manufacturers.

“Fifty years in business is a noteworthy milestone, and we’re thrilled to not only still be in business, but to be thriving,” says Mike Petersen, CEO. “Our ability to identify, plan for and adapt to a myriad of market opportunities has been a big reason for our success. I am proud to have taken the reins from my father and help build on the foundation he laid 50 years ago. This is an exciting time for Petersen Aluminum, and I think we’re in good position to tackle the next 50 years.”

The main key to the company’s success is the hard work of dedicated employees in every position at Petersen Aluminum. Petersen notes the importance of the company’s vast supply of institutional knowledge, with a management team that averages 34 years of employment and includes many who worked with Maury, who passed away in 1996.

Dedication and longevity can be found at the company’s five locations, too, where it is common to meet people who have worked for the company for 15, 20 and 30 years or more. Providing employees with a corporate culture that fosters professional development, personal accountability and an enjoyable environment is important at Petersen Aluminum. “We take pride in giving our personnel a chance to develop their skills in an entrepreneurial environment. I am proud of how many people have chosen to devote their careers to PAC,” he adds.

Customers, partners and industry friends wanting to acknowledge Petersen Aluminum’s 50th anniversary are encouraged to leave a message on Petersen Aluminum’s Facebook page.

Management’s Perspective

Members of Petersen Aluminum’s executive management team average more than 30 years working at the company, and all are deeply invested in its success. President John Palesny has the longest tenure at 45 years, and cites several reasons for the company’s endurance.

“The financial strength of the company is a prime reason for our longevity,” says Palesny. “Maury Petersen, the founder of our company, had a mantra that he repeated often: pay down your debt. Maury grew up during the Depression and it had a life-long impact on his thinking about financial responsibility. While he was a risk taker when it came to business opportunities, he also believed in paying down debt whenever the opportunity arose. That attitude has been a part of PAC’s culture throughout the years.

“PAC has always given its people wide latitude in pursuing their objectives. We believe in local initiative and give managers free rein as to how they meet their goals,” Palesny continues. “We have excellent internal communications that are focused on how we can better serve our customers. Our people are confident in their abilities while keeping their egos well in check. Among my colleagues at Petersen Aluminum there is a closeness that few other organizations can match. Most of us have been here for a number of years and wouldn’t dream of working anywhere else. I think that says a lot about the management philosophy of Maury and Mike Petersen.”

Jon Snyder, vice president, also believes in the value of good people and their contribution to the success of Petersen Aluminum. “Maury believed that every employee is a salesperson for the company, and to keep your employees and customers happy. Maury always preached, ‘have fun, work hard and no politics,’” Snyder remembers. “Our company was built on a strong, professional sales-minded approach. We have found our niches along the way and worked hard to succeed within them, but have always been willing to change when necessary.”

Snyder adds that while Petersen Aluminum can be conservative and strives to operate without debt, the company isn’t afraid to take necessary risks, and when those efforts are financially rewarded, “We pour the rewards back into our business and our people.”

Vice President Mike Palesny recalls the company’s respect for and attention to the customer. “We may not be the lowest price in the marketplace, but we are always competitive in terms of customer service levels. And we pay attention to what the market wants. For example, at our early stages in the architectural marketplace, our focus was on anodized finishes. We recognized in the late ’70s that Kynar was the future and successfully made that tack. In the late ’80s and early ’90s we recognized the call for factory-formed roofing panels and dove in. Now we’re seeing the company focus on the entire building envelope, and of particular interest the exterior walls. I think our wall panel business will be a source of real growth for the company in the next 10 years,” Palesny says.

Mike Palesny hopes to see the business continue to grow and diversify both geographically and possibly through additional product lines. “We are a conservatively managed company and I think our future is bright. We’ve adapted to market shifts by paying attention to our balance sheet, paying off our debts and listening to our customers, which we will continue to do,” he notes.

Tom Bell, vice president, adds, “Of all the things that make Petersen Aluminum such a great company, none is more important than the talent and dedication of our employees day after day, for after all this is the only truly sustainable competitive advantage any company can process in this marketplace.”

Adapting, Investing in Quality

Adaptation is a critical skill for any business to possess, as Petersen Aluminum has demonstrated for 50 years. As technology changes the way construction professionals communicate and process information to meet critical project timelines, Petersen Aluminum continues to adapt to meet the needs of those professionals. For example, the company’s website provides e-tools that include everything required to shop for, specify, bid, purchase and install its metal products, as well as apps for tablets and smartphones that accomplish the same goals on whichever operating platform a professional might need.

Petersen Aluminum also is committed to quality products and service, and can prove it. In 2006, along with its corporate partners Valspar and Precoat Metals, a formal quality control program was initiated. The QC program that was developed has greatly enhanced the quality and consistency of the product Petersen Aluminum brings to market. “As a result of this ongoing program, the product that goes out the door is as good or better than anything available in the commercial market, and field issues with our product have become practically nonexistent,” Mike Petersen says.

Petersen Aluminum keeps its focus on the future, including how to address external market forces that are sure to include sustainable construction, material supplies and prices, competition for materials, construction workforce shifts, regulation, consolidation and others. “We’ve been successfully navigating market shifts and challenges through our history and we will continue to do so,” Petersen says.

Company History

In February 1965, Maurice Petersen began operation of Petersen Aluminum as an aluminum distributor in Chicago. The concept was to distribute aluminum mill products for aluminum producers not having a distributor organization or outlets for their products. Two manufacturers of truck cabs and printing plates promised support in the new venture.

Business began in a pie-shaped office rented for $75 a month. The lists of partners and customers grew as did revenue. Early on, the company moved frequently as business grew. By 1967, the company owned a truck, a 60-inch cut-to-length line, a shear and a saw. An unofficial company motto evolved: work hard, have fun, no politics.

In July 1972, Petersen Aluminum relocated to Schiller Park, Ill., and acquired an aluminum anodizing line, a decision that launched the company into the architectural metals arena. The company continues to maintain an anodizing line today. During that period, the company developed its PAC-CLAD product line beginning with prefinished Kynar 500 aluminum and later adding prefinished PAC-CLAD steel. During the next two and a half decades, Petersen Aluminum grew its revenue and product line while expanding geographically, until 1994 when the company constructed and moved into its headquarters in Elk Grove Village, Ill., where it remains today. The architectural metals manufacturer also operates facilities in four branch locations including Acworth, Ga.; Tyler, Texas; Annapolis Junction, Md.; and Fridley, Minn.

Petersen Aluminum strives to provide high-quality products within reliable, dependable lead times. Its strong national sales base allows it to maintain large inventories and provide cost economies to its customers. The product line now includes architectural and structural roofing, metal wall panels, soffit, composite panels, edge metals, aluminum and steel coil, and flat sheet in painted, anodized and mill finish.

Long-recognized as an industry manufacturer of metal standing seam roofing products, Petersen also offers exposed fastener panels, flush panels, composite wall panels and column covers. All provide the well-known Petersen quality and are available in PAC-CLAD Kynar 500 finish in 38 standard colors on steel and 37 aluminum. Most colors meet LEED, ENERGY STAR and Cool Roof Rating Council certification requirements.

Barker Ends Career at Petersen Aluminum Corp.

Bill Barker concluded 27 years in the metal market working for Petersen Aluminum Corp., a career which endured such changes as consolidation on the producer side, Reynolds closing its doors, the influence of imports on pricing, numerous customers going out of business and many more challenges.

“I enjoyed my career at Petersen,” Barker says. “Management treated me very well—excellent, in fact, and I’m grateful. They allowed me the freedom to handle my accounts as I deemed necessary. There was no micro managing, which allowed me to succeed.” Barker is looking forward to a semi-retirement, and will keep his “fingers in the pie. I have an excellent relationship with my customer base.”

Petersen Aluminum CEO Mike Petersen wished Barker well. “Our good friend and long-time associate Bill Barker has retired from Petersen Aluminum Corp., completing a 27-year career that included responsibility for Chicago industrial sales, glass industry sales, and management of our stainless steel product line,” Petersen said. “Bill developed a diverse and loyal customer base through his dedicated efforts and he will be missed by his friends, colleagues and fellow employees at Petersen. As the cake we shared with him said, ‘Retire in Peace, Bill’—but better yet, retire in prosperity!”

Petersen Aluminum President Offers Career Advice to Chicago Shelter Guests

Guests at the Breakthrough Urban Ministries’ shelter in Chicago received career advice and job-search tips in August when John Palesny, president of Petersen Aluminum Corp., Elk Grove Village, Ill., gave a presentation during the organization’s job readiness course.

In addition to employment advice, Palesny shared the background of the metals industry as well as a list of qualities manufacturers look for when considering candidates for employment. “The guests at the shelter were receptive to the advice I was sharing with them. They asked good questions and were really engaged. I enjoyed the experience and was happy to help,” Palesny said. The mission of the job readiness course was to equip shelter guests with the skills they need to be successful in their pursuit of employment.

Volunteer and member of the Breakthrough Young Professionals Board Ashley DeVecht said the evening was a success. “Shelter guests were receptive to John and we had a lively Q&A session after he was finished making his presentation. Many of the guests were eager to share their experience with the metals industry. Some had worked for garage door manufacturers or with a company that made paint cans. Many were certified to drive a fork lift, too. John left them with an inquisitive outlook toward the metals industry and with confidence in their skill sets and job experience. That is the most valuable outcome of John’s talk—confidence.”

Breakthrough partners with those affected by poverty on Chicago’s west side and serves Chicago’s men, women and children in the East Garfield Park neighborhood. Breakthrough has been working for 20 years to bring forward what’s positive about the East Garfield Park neighborhood and eliminate its struggle against the cycle of poverty. Services include a men’s shelter, women’s shelter, after-school program, preschool-age program, Fresh Market neighborhood food pantry, mentor-based youth running club and much more.

Each year, Breakthrough …

  • Serves 70,000 meals to the homeless.
  • Provides 300 homeless men and women with 24/7 shelter and free health care.
  • Connects 580 youth to a support network that provides opportunity.
  • Supplies 1,100 families with groceries and fresh produce.