Three Sioux City Community School District Projects Are Part of Long-Term Plan

In 2017, Winkler Roofing crews re-roofed portions of two high schools and one elementary school. Shown here is an aerial photo of East High School. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

For the Sioux City Community School District (SCCSD) in Sioux City, Iowa, the final dismissal bell of the school year marks more than the start of summer break for students and staff. It also signals the beginning of roofing season.

In addition to routine maintenance and repairs, each summer brings at least one major roofing project for the district and its 24 facilities. Existing roofs that have fallen out of warranty coverage are replaced. The district also has completed a steady stream of construction projects over the past 16 years, replacing aging schools to meet evolving needs.

District enrollment has increased by several hundred students over that timeframe and now stands at more than 14,500. SCCSD also has expanded its programming, creating specialty elementary schools focusing on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), computer programming, environmental sciences, the arts, and dual-language education in English and Spanish. These specialties continue with middle school exploratory classes and eventually lead to the Sioux City Career Academy, which offers numerous education pathways to help students prepare for postsecondary education and careers.

Aerial view of West High School. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

“Our facilities need to keep up with the curriculum and new technologies so we can provide the best possible learning environments for our students,” says SCCSD Director of Operations and Maintenance Brian Fahrendholz, adding that the facilities plan emphasizes both supporting student achievement and maintaining fiscal responsibility.

Winkler Roofing Inc. of Sioux City has been one of the district’s key partners in this process for more than 20 years, installing new or partial roofing systems on nearly every building in the district. The summer of 2017 saw its crews re-roof portions of two high schools and one elementary school, installing 335 squares of new TPO roof systems and removing 170 tons of ballast.

A crew of between six and nine professionals was on a jobsite at any given time. The three projects were completed in less than a month, beginning in late June and wrapping up in late July. And there was nothing on the punch list following the warranty inspections.

A Systematic Approach

In recent years, SCCSD has adopted a systematic, long-range-planning approach to roof system management, working with local architects to evaluate its facilities, identify and plan work that needs to be completed the following summer, and map out future projects. The three roofs replaced in 2017 were indicative of this approach.

TPO Bonding Adhesive is applied on the substrate and the back of TPO membrane. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

Each of the roofs was between 15 and 20 years old and had begun to show signs of age. Their manufacturers’ warranties had also expired in recent years, making their replacement next up on the district’s roofing project schedule.

“We typically replace roofing systems within five years of the warranty expiration,” Fahrendholz explains. “It enables us to stay ahead of the maintenance issues that can begin cropping up.”

All three existing roofs had ballasted EPDM roofing systems. The re-roofing projects continued the district’s move toward TPO systems and, where possible, eliminating ballast. The three new roofing systems have 20-year, no-dollar-limit labor and material warranties.

SCCSD has several reasons for moving away from ballasted systems, according to Winkler Roofing President Jeff Winkler, P.E. In addition to reducing the roof’s weight and eliminating the cost of the ballast, unballasted roofs have a neater appearance and it is easier to monitor the membrane’s condition and find and repair any leaks. And, of course, when the time for re-roofing comes, there are no truckloads of ballast to remove and replace.

According to Winkler, SCCSD likes the durability of TPO membranes. “They like that the membrane is reinforced and that the seams are heat-welded, rather than seamed with primer and tape,” Winkler notes.

East High School Project

Re-roofing a 5,356-square-foot section at East High School entailed a complete tear-off of the existing ballasted EPDM roofing system and insulation down to the steel roof deck. The Winkler Roofing team then installed a new system topped with Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film from Mule-Hide Products Co. It was the first time Winkler Roofing had installed the prodcut.

At East High School, polyisocyanurate insulation is installed using 3-inch galvalume plates and drill point fasteners. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

Three layers of polyisocyanurate insulation were mechanically fastened with screws and plates to enhance the building’s energy efficiency. The 60-mil TPO membrane was then fully adhered using TPO Bonding Adhesive from Mule-Hide Products.

The last step in any well-done TPO project is removing the dirt and scuffs that are inevitably left behind during installation, notes Winkler. That step is eliminated with this product; the crew simply removes the protective film covering the membrane to reveal a clean roof that is ready for inspection.

“The material is more expensive than regular TPO membranes, but there is the potential to make up for that in reduced labor costs,” Winkler notes.

The biggest benefit would be seen on roofs that have fewer penetrations, according to Winkler. Installing the membrane around penetrations requires removing a portion of the protective film, he explains. Because those areas are then exposed to scuffs and dirt, crews must go back and clean them by hand.

West High School Project

Meticulous detail work was key to the successful replacement of a 18,056-square-foot section of the roof at West High School. There were nearly four dozen penetrations in the roof, from 4-inch pipes to HVAC equipment measuring 8 feet by 12 feet. Many of the chimney stacks also were in spots that were awkward for the crew to work around.

Winkler Roofing crew members prepare to install a TPO walkway pad. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

It was all in a day’s work for the Winkler Roofing team. “The quality of our detail work is one of the things we take pride in,” Winkler says. “The keys are good leadership, both on and off the roof, and a well-seasoned crew. My foreman, Absalon Quezada, is a master of solving the toughest of details and coordinating a well-orchestrated crew.”

The roof’s existing concrete deck made a mechanically attached system uneconomical, so a new ballasted system was specified. The existing ballast had deteriorated to the point that, if reused, it could puncture the new roofing membrane. So, all 100 tons of it, along with the existing EPDM membrane, were removed and disposed of. The pieces of stainless steel cap metal along the perimeter were removed and numbered in sequence for reinstallation later. Sections of water-damaged insulation were removed and replaced.

An additional layer of polyisocyanurate insulation was loose-layered over the entire roof to improve energy efficiency, followed by a new loose-layered 60-mil white TPO membrane. New ballast was then installed.

Details such as this pipe boot were installed using a hot-air welder. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

The crew navigated a challenging site while depositing the new ballast on the roof of the one-story building. The site offered only one feasible parking spot for the seven dump trucks that would deliver the rock, and that was on a lawn, just on the other side of two large trees. Crews carefully noted the location of sprinklers for the in-ground irrigation system to avoid driving over them, and shut the system down for several days in advance of the delivery to minimize ruts caused by the trucks’ tires. The trees’ trunks were spaced less than 20 feet apart and the canopies have grown together, leaving only small tunnel to feed the conveyor through. Crews kept the conveyor low as they extended it through the branches, then brought it to roof height by repeatedly raising it and the backing the truck up.

Riverside Elementary School Project

At Riverside Elementary School, a 7,314-square-foot section of roof was replaced with a 60-mil, fully attached TPO system.

The existing EPDM membrane, ballast and edge metal flashings were removed and disposed of. Crews removed and replaced any water-damaged insulation, added an additional layer of polyisocyanurate insulation throughout to increase the building’s energy efficiency, and mechanically attached the insulation to the steel roof deck using screws and plates. The white TPO membrane was then installed using bonding adhesive, and new edge metal flashings were added.

Straight A’s on the Report Card

The new roofs received top grades on their inspection report cards.

At East High School, crews installed Mule-Hide TPO with CLEAN Film from Mule-Hide Products Co. The last step in the installation process is removing the protective film covering the membrane. Photos: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc.

When Mule-Hide Products Co. Territory Manager Jake Rowell inspected the roofs, there were no items on his, or the district’s, punch list. The only remaining task — which was completed during the inspection — was covering the seams on the West High School roof with ballast; they had intentionally been left exposed for easy inspection. In fact, that was the only “to-do list” item Rowell noted during inspections of 11 Winkler Roofing projects that week.

“The quality of their work is phenomenal,” Rowell says. “The crews take pride in their work. They don’t just throw a project together and move on. They check their work to make sure it’s done right before I see it and before the customer sees it.”

THE TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Winkler Roofing Inc., Sioux City, Iowa
Architect: FEH DESIGN, Sioux City, Iowa, www.fehdesign.com
Roofing Materials Distributor: ABC Supply Co. Inc., www.abcsupply.com
Decorative Sheet Metal: Interstate Mechanical Corp., Sioux City, Iowa, www.interstatemechanicalcorp.com

MATERIALS

TPO Membrane Roof Systems: Mule-Hide Products Co. Inc., www.mulehide.com

Koscher Is Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association’s New President

The Arlington, Va.-based Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA) has announced Justin Koscher has assumed presidency of the association as of Jan. 1. Koscher succeeds Jared Blum who served as PIMA president from 1990 to 2016.

“With an accomplished record of leadership in insulation and energy-efficient construction coalitions, Justin brings broad experience in the roofing and polyurethanes industries, as well as strong advocacy and association management experience,” says Helene Pierce, chairman of PIMA’s board of directors. “He is widely respected within our industry and will be a tireless advocate for polyisocyanurate insulation and sustainable building practices in the years to come.”

Koscher previously was director of Polyurethanes Markets at the Washington, D.C.-based American Chemistry Council’s Center for Polyurethanes Industry (CPI) and held a leadership role on the Sustainability Committee, which represents the U.S. polyurethanes industry on building codes and standards, blowing agents, fire safety and environmental issues. He also directed CPI’s Spray Foam Coalition, an organization of spray polyurethane foam systems houses, raw material suppliers and equipment manufacturers.

“Sustainable building insulation is the key to driving energy efficiency in the modern era,” Koscher says. “PIMA has been at the forefront of advancing this value proposition for decades and I look forward to continuing to position polyiso’s significant role in reducing the built infrastructure’s impact on the environment and enhancing the performance of the buildings we live and work in each day.”

Prior to joining CPI in 2014, Koscher served as vice president of Public Policy at the Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing, Washington. There, he worked with trade association members to develop policy priorities from local through federal levels, including building codes, product standards and renewable-energy legislation.

To learn more, visit Polyiso.org.

NRCA Releases 2015-16 Market Survey

NRCA has released its 2015-16 market survey, providing information about overall sales-volume trends in the roofing industry, roofing experiences, material usage and regional breakdowns. It is an important tool to measure the scope of the U.S. roofing industry, and the data provides a glimpse into which roof systems are trending in the low- and steep-slope roofing markets.

This year’s survey reports sales volumes for 2015 and 2016 projections averaged between $8 million and almost $9 million, respectively, and revealed a near-steady ratio of low- to steep-slope sales of 74 percent to 26 percent.

For low-slope roofs, TPO remains the market leader with a 40 percent share of the new construction market and 30 percent of the reroofing market for 2015. Asphalt shingles continue to dominate the steep-slope roofing market with a 47 percent market share for new construction and a 59 percent share for reroofing.

Polyisocyanurate insulation continues to lead its sector of the market with 80 percent of new construction and 73 percent of reroofing work. In addition, roof cover board installation for 2015 was reported as 22 percent in new construction, 42 percent in reroofing tear-offs and 36 percent in re-cover projects.

NRCA’s market survey enables roofing contractors to compare their material usage with contractors in other regions and provides manufacturers and distributors with data to analyze, which can affect future business decisions.

NRCA members may download a free electronic copy of the 2016 survey.

NRCA’s Roof Calculator Has Been Updated to Include ICC’s IECC and IgCC, ASHRAE Standard 90.1, and More

NRCA’s EnergyWise Roof Calculator Online has been updated to include information from the 2015 versions of the International Code Council’s IECC and IgCC, as well as the 2013 version of ASHRAE Standard 90.1. Revised minimum long-term thermal resistance values and NRCA’s latest recommendations for minimum R-values for polyisocyanurate insulation have been included in the application. The application also will determine the temperature gradient through a roof assembly and present the information graphically on a report.

Users will find this beneficial when evaluating the effectiveness of a vapor retarder. The EnergyWise Roof Calculator Online is available for free on NRCA’s EnergyWise Roof Calculator page.

Roof Hatch Is Designed to Provide Energy Efficiency

The Bilco Co. has introduced a thermally broken roof hatch.

The Bilco Co. has introduced a thermally broken roof hatch.

The Bilco Co. has introduces a thermally broken roof hatch, an addition to its line of commercial specialty access products. This new product features a thermally broken frame and cover design to minimize heat transfer and the effects of condensation and to provide energy efficiency.

As a basic premise to energy loss, heat by nature wants to flow to a cooler space. During summer months, heat from the extremely hot roof exterior wants to radiate through the roof hatch into the cooler building interior. While standard roof-hatch insulation helps to reduce this heat gain, the metal construction of the roof hatch itself facilitates this temperature transfer, which can lead to increased utility costs and condensation issues on the underside of the roof hatch. In winter or colder months, this same energy transfer principle results in heat loss from inside the building and increased energy expenses, as well.

Bilco¹s new thermally broken roof hatch is designed with an element of low conductivity integrated between interior and exterior surfaces of the cover and frame to reduce temperature transfer. As an added benefit, these same thermally broken components dampen vibration for improved acoustic performance against outside noise. The product also features 3 square feet of polyisocyanurate insulation with an R-value of 18 in both the cover and curb for superior energy performance and a special cover gasket to minimize air leakage.

Thermally broken roof hatches are constructed of aluminum to attain high levels in recycled content and solar reflective index. The product will be offered in a number of standard single-leaf sizes and custom sizes can be specified. As with all Bilco’s roof hatches, the product features counter-balanced lift assistance for easy one-hand operation, an automatic hold-open arm, a heavy-duty slam latch with interior and exterior padlock hasps, and the innovative Bil-Clip flashing system for quick and easy installation on single-ply roofs.

GAF Plans to Open PVC Manufacturing Line in Cedar City, Utah

GAF announced plans to open a PVC manufacturing line at its commercial roofing plant in Cedar City, Utah. The line, which GAF expects to become operational as early as mid-2016, will transform the Cedar City operation into a full-service manufacturer and supplier of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) single-ply membranes, as well as polyisocyanurate (ISO) insulation.

GAF also announced that it is actively considering locations for an additional plant in the eastern U.S. that will manufacture PVC, TPO and ISO. Known for its flexibility, ease of application and chemical resistance, PVC remains a single-ply solution among commercial roofing contractors.

“The Cedar City PVC line will strengthen GAF’s position as a full-service supplier of PVC, TPO and ISO. By manufacturing all three products at Cedar City and soon on the east coast, we will deliver economies of scale to our operations and quality service to our customers. This investment demonstrates our continued commitment to growth and leadership in the low-slope roofing market,” says Bob Tafaro, president and CEO of GAF.

“GAF is poised to leverage our track record of innovation and operational excellence. We’re ready to bring to the PVC market the same ingenuity and manufacturing expertise that have helped us to manufacture best-in-class TPO products.”

Johns Manville Advises Customers of Revised LTTR Values

Johns Manville is advising customers of revised LTTR, or Long-Term Thermal Resistance, values for its polyisocyanurate insulation product line through a packet of information detailing the updated specifications. JM also has modified its packaging to reflect LTTR values by both test methods. As an example, a 1-inch board label will now include information from LTTR-S770-03: 6.0 (the old test method) and LTTR-S770-09: 5.7 (the new test method). To learn more and access an informational booklet, visit www. jm.com and click on the LTTR banner.