Research Proves Radiant Barrier Market Is Growing

Persistence Market Research (PMR), a third-party research firm based in New York City, has shared its research on the radiant barrier market. PMR hosts a research model with collaboration of data analytics and market research methodology to help businesses achieve optimal performance.

In addition to a brief overview of how radiant barriers work, what materials are used and their various applications, the report also states, “The global radiant barrier market is anticipated to be driven by many factors, out of which the main factor being global warming. The product is finding acceptance as people use radiant barriers in their homes and buildings so that the heat is prevented from coming inside, making the place comparatively cooler. Radiant barriers are most effective in blocking summer radiant heat gain thus, saving air-cooling costs of the desired space. Also, use of radiant barrier has been helpful for the builders in getting accreditation for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED), which is a mandatory norm for design of buildings – in both residential and commercial segments, thus resulting in increase of demand of the product.”

For more information on this report you can contact PMR directly at (800)961-0353. For more information on reflective insulation, radiant barriers and interior radiation control coatings (IRCCs), visit the RIMA International website or contact them directly at rima@rima.net.

Roof Tiles Are Embedded with Solar Cells

Power Shield Inc. has introduced roof tiles that have solar cells embedded into them.

Power Shield Inc. has introduced roof tiles that have solar cells embedded into them.

Power Shield Inc. has introduced roof tiles that have solar cells embedded into them. The tiles are designed to cover the whole roof. The Power Shield roof system features a cool roof coating, above-deck ventilation, and is made from recycled and non-combustible, lightweight steel. Energy is produced through the 16 watts of power per solar tile. Building-envelope thermal performance is improved through:

  • Cool roof coatings on tile keep it cool and improve energy production. The cool roof coating has high emissivity on the sun side to allow heat to be radiated out and low emissivity underneath, making the tiles a radiant barrier.
  • The efficient above-sheathing ventilation on the tile system provides a chimney effect as warm air flows between the tiles and the roof deck and out from the building. In winter, the air gap between the tiles and roof deck are insulating, reducing the heat transfer out of the attic.

Radiant Barrier Combines Energy Efficiency with Moisture Protection

Huber Engineered Woods has released its ZIP System radiant barrier.

Huber Engineered Woods has released its ZIP System radiant barrier.

The most recent innovation from Huber Engineered Woods combines superior strength and stiffness, moisture resistance, and now a radiant heat barrier. The new ZIP System radiant barrier incorporates the signature ZIP System technology with radiant heat protection.

ZIP System radiant barrier combines the energy-efficiency benefits of radiant barrier with the superior moisture protection and simple installation of ZIP System sheathing. The panels are now available for national distribution.

ZIP System radiant barrier panels block up to 97 percent of radiant heat transfer which can lower attic temperatures by as much as 30 degrees. The all-in-one sheathing allows for a faster, more efficient installation, providing an instant 180-day rough dry-in. Homeowners also can reap the benefits of ZIP System Radiant Barrier, as the roof panels reduce home cooling costs up to 12 percent.*

ZIP System radiant barrier roof panels are available in 1/2-, 5/8-, and 7/16-inch thicknesses. ZIP System roof panels eliminate the need for felt paper, resulting in a more efficient building process.

*All testing. Testing was done in accordance with ASTM standard and test methods. The Florida Solar Energy Center/University of Central Florida Publication #FSEC-EN-15-87 titled “Radiant Barriers: A Question & Answer Primer.” Studies represent cases in the Southeast and may not be representative of other regions. Savings also depend on the amount of heat the roof and attic contribute to a home’s cooling load.