Temporary Roof Membrane Offers Solution for Storm-Damaged Roofs

FiberTite Blue Roof FiberTite Roofing Systems introduces its new temporary roofing membrane, FiberTite Blue Roof. The FiberTite Blue Roof is a fabric-reinforced thermoplastic roof membrane designed for use on flat commercial and industrial roofs to offer a temporary solution for damaged roofs until permanent repairs can be made. The coating on the temporary roof membrane provides UV resistant performance for up to one year, as well as abrasion resistance. The fabric reinforcement provides both tear and puncture resistance. It is available in rolls that are 100 inches wide by 100 feet long. According to the manufacturer, it is ideal for temporary repair of damage caused by disastrous weather events, and it can also be used for tear-off areas or new construction until the final roof assembly can be installed.

The temporary membrane can be made watertight by conventional commercial hot-air weld seaming equipment. Alternate temporary seaming and sealing methods may include the use of FiberTite FTR-101 General Purpose Sealant, waterproofing caulk sealants, or adhesive tapes including duct tape. FiberTite accessories, such as molded pipe seals and corners, flashing membrane and FiberTite FTR-101 Sealant, can be used to temporarily seal roof penetrations.

NRCA Roofing Contractor Members Receive Free Consulting Services

The National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) announces it is now providing consulting services at no charge to its roofing contractor members.

NRCA’s Consulting Services is a benefit of membership that enables contractors to get tips and advice on current business issues, discuss business strategies or issues with consultants in the following areas.

•Legal— Roofing contractor members can obtain information about general legal issues encountered in daily business.

•Marketing— Assistance with current marketing plans is provided, as well as strategies for increasing homeowner and business owner sales and profitability.

•Information Technology— IT strategies for improving and streamlining operations for maximum business performance.

•Human Resources— Solutions to human resources related issues including federal or state employment law, employee relations and human resource management.

•Enterprise Risk Management— Advice about health, safety, insurance, legislative and regulatory issues, or learn more about loss control and regulatory compliance responsibilities.

•Technical— Solutions to technical questions including proper installation, maintenance or repair of various roof systems, or advice on a specific project.

Asking Many Questions Helps Property Managers Prepare Reroofing Budgets

Property managers are challenged with three basic decisions for their existing roof systems: Should they repair, maintain or replace their roof system? The proper execution of each phase of the roof condition will determine the longevity of a roof system. Every roof is different and requires detailed evaluation and analysis for budgeting and decision-making purposes.

The bottom line is: What is your desired outcome for your roof and what is your budget? How can you extend the life of your roofing asset and reduce the cost of ownership?

For the purpose of this discussion, we’ll focus on reroofing.

UNDERSTAND YOUR OPTIONS

If you decide to replace your roof, you have to analyze the expense of a new roof, as well as the total investment cost during the lifespan of the roof. Ask yourself these questions and work with your roofing contractor to better understand all options.

    ▪▪ What’s best for my roof, climate and budget?
    ▪▪ What do I want from my roof, other than no roof leaks?
    ▪▪ Should I prepare a one-year budget or a multi-year budget?
    ▪▪ Do I want energy-efficient solutions (improved R-values), daylighting solutions (reduce my electric bills, qualify for energy rebates) and/or safety enhancements (meet or exceed OSHA standards)?
    ▪▪ What operation, service or product is underneath my roof? Product and installation decisions are made differently for roofs over food-processing plants, semiconductor plants or hospitals, for example.
    ▪▪ What three things are most important for my new roof, other than price? (Roofing materials, manufacturer of product, weather, pollution, warranty, maintenance, aesthetics, contractor’s safety requirements, return on investment, energy efficiency, roof traffic or other concerns, for example.)
    ▪▪ What is the value of the roof system as a long-term cost of ownership and not just based on initial price?
    ▪▪ Can we reduce the capital budget by removing expensible items, such as labor for the removal of the existing roof and the cost for disposal of the old roofing materials?

DO YOUR RESEARCH

Work with your roofing contractor to prepare a comprehensive plan for reroofing. The National Roofing Contractors Association and Building Owners and Managers Association International also are excellent resources.

Have your contractor review the best options for your building related to insulation type and amount; drainage condition and requirements; roofing membrane type/thickness; and safety requirements, such as roof hatches, guard rails, skylight screens and walk pads. Look at the slope of the roof to avoid standing-water problems. Are your gutters, downspouts and drains properly sized for adequate water drainage?

Budget numbers should be based on actual costs using measurement tools and Roof Life Index (RLI) tools. When budgeting for a capital project, there can be changes between the time the budget is set and when the project is installed. Materials and/or labor prices can increase. Damage to a roof can increase due to age, weather or other circumstances. Work with your contractor to lock in pricing for repair work during the interim months until the reroofing project begins.

Consider a thermal scan to define the extent of any compromised insulation.

Review local and national building codes for R-value and wind-uplift requirements. Check with your insurance carrier to determine whether the roof replacement system meets its requirements for roof assemblies.

It takes research, planning and capital to install a new roof system. Your roofing contractor is an excellent partner in reviewing your roofing needs, your budget considerations and maximizing the investment in your roofing asset.