Pieces of History

A home built in 1879. A hotel built in 1902. An industrial site that produced destroyers during World War II. What do these sites have in common? Roofs that stood the test of time, and then were recently restored with modern systems that preserve the historic integrity of the structures.

If you’re a bit of a pessimist, sometimes you might find yourself wondering how any roof gets successfully replaced. Re-roofing involves a coordinated effort that typically includes manufacturers, distributors, contractors and installation crews. Factor in architects, consultants, building owners, tenants, and members of other trades, and the odds of pleasing everyone increase exponentially. When you’re talking about a historic restoration project, the degree of difficulty gets even tougher, as historical societies and other organizations can have rigid standards designed to guarantee the building maintains its historic authenticity.

Historic projects can show the roofing industry at its best, and in this issue, you’ll find three case studies documenting roofs being restored on structures that have been around well over a century.

When the original soldered flat-panel roof on the historic Dilley-Tinnin home in Georgetown, Texas was damaged by lightning, crews from Texas Traditions Roofing were faced with a difficult, labor-intensive puzzle as they installed a double-lock standing seam roof system on multiple intersecting roof planes with low-slope transitions.

On the Chippewa Hotel on Mackinac Island, the Bloxsom Roofing faced a challenging re-roofing project and also found themselves facing turn-of-the-century problems on an island that doesn’t allow motorized vehicles. The roofing materials were delivered by ferry and transported to the jobsite by a team of horses.

At historic Pier 70 in San Francisco, an ambitious restoration project converted an empty industrial facility into a modern office complex. But ensuring occupant comfort proved a difficult task in a building without air conditioning. Central Coating Company devised a plan to install a spray foam roofing system on the uninsulated metal roof to minimize heat gain and ensure the historic look of the building.

These stories share common themes, including the importance of quality craftsmanship, then and now. In the case of Pier 70, Central Coating Company President Luke Nolan points out that aside from a few persistent leaks, the original corrugated metal roof was in pretty good shape.

“For us as a foam roofing contractor, we typically do roofing projects that have the benefit of adding insulation to the building,” Nolan said. “This one was different in that we were doing a foam roofing project that was really an insulation job.”

Complex Metal Roof Replacement Becomes Award-Winning Project

The main roof on the historic Dilley-Tinnin home was made up of multiple roof planes and featured an internal gutter. Photos: Texas Traditions Roofing

Located just outside of Austin in Georgetown, Texas, the historic Dilley-Tinnin home dates back to 1879. When it was struck by lightning, the main roof was damaged beyond repair. The original soldered, flat panel roof would have to be removed and replaced as part of a restoration project that posed numerous challenges.

The roof was made up of some 20 roof planes and included an internal gutter system, numerous penetrations, and multiple low-slope transitions. The new metal roof would have to be watertight and durable — and meet strict guidelines for historical accuracy.

Crews from nearby Texas Traditions Roofing were up to the challenge. They removed the damaged sections of the existing roof and installed a striking red standing seam metal roof manufactured by Sheffield Metals.

Michael Pickel, vice president of Texas Traditions Roofing, was called in to assess the damage. The original roof had a standing seam look to it in some sections, but it was comprised of metal panels that were soldered together. “It was metal 100 percent, from the fascia, to the gutter, to the flat portion, all soldered together into one piece,” he notes.

Crews from Texas Traditions Roofing removed the damaged sections of the existing roof and installed a red standing seam roof manufactured by Sheffield Metals.

The entire main roof area would have to be replaced, while the gray metal roof system on one wing was left in place. The main roof was comprised of multiple roof areas with slopes ranging from completely flat to pitches of 3:12 and 4:12. “It really wasn’t that steep, and that’s what caused us to recommend the double-lock panels,” Pickel says. “Given all of the soffits and all of the transitions, the slope required us to use a double lock.”

The Texas Traditions team worked for eight months with the local historical committee to ensure that the new roof would meet its guidelines. The committee approved the 2.0 Mechanical Standing Seam roof manufactured by Sheffield Metals, and the roof restoration work began.

The metal panels of the original roof were removed, along with most of the internal gutter. “The home was leaking pretty bad,” Pickel recalls. “There was some significant damage to the integral gutter, and we had to rebuild at least 80 percent of it. It was flat, and we added slope to it. It was a beast. We tore the whole thing off and came in with all manufacturer approved products: high-temp synthetic underlayment, high-temp ice and water, and the metal panels and butyl sealant.”

The existing roof was damaged by lightning. The soldered, flat panel roof had to be removed and replaced.

Most of the deck was in good shape, but the fascia needed extensive repairs. Extreme care had to be taken to protect the custom carpentry just below the eaves. “It was a crazy custom fascia,” Pickel notes. “We’ve never seen anything like it before.”

After the internal gutter was rebuilt, it was lined with a 60-mil TPO membrane from GAF. “We did a metal fascia, and it was also lined with TPO. It ran about 18 inches up behind the field panels to give it some added security. It was also lined with ice and water shield.”

The metal panels were roll-formed on the site. “Due to all the different lengths, we took measurements, rolled them on site, and applied them one at a time,” Pickel explains. “All of the trim and accessories were manufactured in our metal shop and brought to the site.”

Panels were lifted into place with a rope-and-pulley system and installed over Viking Armor synthetic underlayment and GAF StormGuard leak barrier. The re-roofed area was approximately 2,500 square feet, but the project was a labor-intensive puzzle. “It was a small project, but it was really cut up,” Pickel says.

Crew members were tied off 100 percent of the time at the eave and while installing the metal panels. “The nice part was it wasn’t too steep, and the lip of the integral gutter added another layer of safety as well,” Pickel explains. “From a safety standpoint, it was pretty basic; the steepest section was 4:12, and a lot of the work was done on the flat area.”

In the flat area, crickets were used provide adequate slope beneath the metal panels. The transitions made for some tricky details. “When you hit the low slope on metal — and that’s really 2:12 or less — you start to be more concerned about making sure you’re doing everything you can to get that water off that roof,” Pickel says. “If the water moves slowly, you have to do all you can to make sure that roof is fully sealed and ensure it just won’t leak.”

Crews tackled the challenges one at a time. “Just like any project, once you start to move on it, it gets a little bit easier,” Pickel says. “We learned a lot as we progressed. Each section made the next section a little bit easier.”

Texas Traditions submitted the project to Metal Roofing Alliance (MRA) for its Best Residential Metal Roofing Project competition, and MRA selected Texas Traditions Roofing and Sheffield Metals as the first-quarter winners in the category.

“When we got the news, we were just ecstatic,” Pickel says. “I think roofers are very proud of the work they do, and to get that recognition is fun and exciting. It also gets the team fired up.”

Pickel credits his company’s success to a simple formula: quality craftsmanship by talented and experienced crews. “One of our owners has been in construction for 40-plus years,” he says, referring to his father, Mike Pickel. “He handled multi-million-dollar commercial projects for a very large general contractor. His experience and ability to manage our jobs, educate our crews, and educate our superintendents helps out gain knowledge beyond the roof. There’s more to it than just the roof, and being mindful of the entire building is a huge advantage.”

For more information about how to enter MRA’s “Best Metal Roofing” competition for the trades, visit www.metalroofing.com.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Texas Traditions Roofing, Georgetown, Texas, www.texastraditionsroofing.com

MATERIALS

Metal Roof: 2-inch mechanical lock panels in Cardinal Red, Sheffield Metals, www.sheffieldmetals.com

Underlayment: Viking Armor synthetic underlayment, VB Synthetics, www.vbsynthetics.com

Leak Barrier: GAF StormGuard, GAF, www.gaf.com

Roof Restoration, Cooperative Purchasing Alliance Offer Savings for Taxpayers

Building I, shown here, had its existing a TPO roof restored using PM’s 3201 high-solids silicone coating. Photos: Anthony Roofing Ltd, a Tecta America Company

After leaks appeared in their middle and elementary school buildings, the St. Joseph Central Consolidated School District in St. Joseph, Illinois, decided it was time to re-evaluate their roofs. Since it is a public agency, the school district began looking into the request for proposal (RFP) process, which can be costly and time-consuming. Thankfully, before they spent too much time or money, they were approached by Anthony Roofing and the Progressive Materials (PM) team.

Anthony Roofing, a Tecta America Company, inspected the roofs and determined they were in prime condition for a roof restoration, as opposed to two full roof replacements. Between this cost-saving measure and the use of the National Cooperative Purchasing Alliance (NCPA) contract, the Anthony Roofing/PM team was able to save the school district a substantial sum of money. The NCPA is a publicly bid contract that allows awarded vendors/contractors to streamline the RFP process for publicly funded work because it has already performed the competitive bid process.

Building II had an EPDM roof system, which was cleaned with PM’s P-120 EPDM Cleaner prior to application of the coating to ensure proper adhesion and optimal waterproofing.

Anthony Roofing is one of Tecta America’s 70-plus locations and is certified to utilize NCPA contracts. Contractors are strongly examined and scrutinized by the lead public agency to become an award-winning contract holder. Contractors must prove a demonstrated track record of quality workmanship, customer satisfaction, and competitive pricing to be an NCPA vendor. Because of this relationship, St. Joseph Central Consolidated School District knew they were getting a top-quality contractor while saving substantial taxpayer money in the process.

Anthony Roofing was able to completely waterproof both buildings’ roofs in just four weeks using just one six-person crew. If the school district had elected to replace the roofs, the teams would have been double in size, taken double the time, and the school would have been vulnerable to even more water damage during the replacement process.

Restoring the Roofs

Building I had a single-ply substrate, which was ideal for the silicone coating process. Anthony Roofing completely restored the roof in three steps. First, crew members power-washed the existing TPO roof. They then patched seams, worn areas, and flashings. Finally, they applied PM’s 3201 high-solids silicone restoration system.

Building II’s roof had an EPDM substrate, so Anthony Roofing took additional measures to ensure proper adhesion and optimal waterproofing. They cleaned the EPDM with PM’s P-120 EPDM Cleaner to prepare for power-washing process. They then power-washed the EPDM roof and patched seams, worn areas, and flashings before applying the coating.

In just four weeks, Anthony Roofing coated roughly 117,000 square feet of roof area for the school district. Both buildings qualified for a 20-year warranty. After calculating the cost savings, it was determined that a roof replacement for these buildings would have cost roughly $18 per square foot. The expert application of the silicone coating reduced the project cost to $3.55 per square foot, saving the school district an estimated $1.6 million. Combine that with the money and time saved by utilizing the NCPA cooperative purchasing contract to streamline the process, and you get two waterproof roofs, one happy school district, and thousands of satisfied taxpayers.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Anthony Roofing Ltd, a Tecta America Company, Aurora, Illinois, www.tectaamerica.com

MATERIALS

Roof Coating System: PM 3201 high-solids silicone coating, Progressive Materials, www.pmsilicone.com

A Roof Coating Is the Right Answer for Florida Condo Complex

Photos: KARNAK Corporation

Educated customers make the best decisions.

That philosophy is shared by Frank Scelzi of Munyan Restoration Waterproofing and Painting Service of Tampa Bay Inc. The company was founded in 1951 as a painting and waterproofing company, and over the years it has evolved into a general contractor that handles restoration of the entire building envelope, including the roof.

Munyan Restoration often educates its customers through seminars, which sometimes have the added benefit of bringing in new business. According to Scelzi, that was how he got involved in the Sage Condo project in St. Petersburg, Florida. “We have a marketing department, and we do what’s called ‘lunch and learns,’” he says. “Our engineer also has several continuing education classes approved for facility managers and building owners who want to keep up to date on certain things. We have these several times throughout the year, and one of the property managers said he needed a roofing inspection.”

The property manager was worried that his roof needed to be replaced, and he asked Scelzi to take a look. Scelzi found the existing TPO roof was nearing the end of its service life, and it had some minor tears and punctures, but he believed the roof would be a good candidate for a restoration coating. He contacted Joe Prussel, Southeast U.S. Regional Manager for KARNAK Corp., to confirm his conclusion and determine which product would be the best fit.

“After the initial evaluation, Frank brought me back to walk the roof and look at the condition of it,” Prussel says. “Frank wanted to give them an option of coating in lieu of tearing everything off and transporting all of the trash to the dump — avoiding not only the cost but the environmental impact that would have, as well as the disruption to the residents that live there because the building has a multi-level roof.”

After adhesion tests proved a high-solids silicone coating would be an excellent fit, Scelzi submitted a written proposal and he and Prussel put on a presentation for the board and the property manager. “We told the board that we’ve been on the roof and had seen the damage that is up there, and we feel that it is a good candidate for a coating application,” Scelzi recalls. “We went through the procedure with them. We told them how we clean the roof, how we do our repairs, apply our primer, do our tie-in work, and ultimately apply the coating.”

After he detailed the safety plan and documented the experience and training of his crews, Scelzi told the residents what to expect during the coating application, stating, “There’s really going to be no disruption of your lifestyle while the coating system is going on.”

The board had been budgeting for a roof replacement, and the coating application was substantially less expensive. It would also be approved for the 20-year warranty the board sought. “They decided to go forward with it,” Scelzi says. “This was a real quick turnaround, which is unusual in the condo market. We were at a board meeting on a Thursday night and had a signed contract Friday morning.”

Following the Plan

A couple of weeks later, the Munyan Restoration crew was executing the plan laid out at the board meeting.

The building had a main roof on the 12th floor and two other roof sections on the fifth floor, totaling approximately 30,000 square feet. The main roof was sloped toward the interior, and its outer edges were approximately 6 feet above the center. “Everything slopes into the roof’s interior to make it more architecturally pleasing,” Scelzi notes. “It gave you a real weird feeling when you stepped out on that roof, but as far as setting up a safety perimeter, it made things fairly easy. The roof also had built-in tie-off points, so our guys could be harnessed, and that made the safety aspect very easy for the guys up there.”

The roof on the Sage Condo complex was restored using a high-solids silicone coating system manufactured by KARNAK. Photos: KARNAK Corporation

The first step was washing the roof with 799 Wash-N-Prep, an environmentally safe cleaner that can go right into the roof drains and the water system. “The entire roof was cleaned,” notes Scelzi. “We used a power washer and a round scrubber head that really raises the dirt from the roof. The roof was pretty dirty, but it really came out very, very clean and it was a real good surface for us to do our repairs and start doing our tie-in work.”

Repairs were made to seams and penetrations using Karna-Flex 505 WB repair mastic with fibers, using a brush application. The next steps included applying the primer and the coating.

The 180 Karna-Sil Epoxy Primer is a two-part epoxy that can be applied with spray equipment or a roller. A roller was used on this project, and it was applied at a rate of 3/4 of a gallon per square. “It really enhances the adhesion of the coating to the roofing membrane,” notes Prussel. “This is one of the products we did an adhesion test with and got very good results. It dries fairly quickly — in three to four hours — which makes it very user friendly.”

After the primer was dry, the Karna-Sil 670 high-solids silicone coating was applied. The product was chosen for several reasons, including its excellent performance in the adhesion test and the fact that the owner wanted a white coating. The product also allowed the contractor to meet the 20-year warranty with only one coat, minimizing labor costs.

The slope of the roof was another key consideration, as crews wanted to make sure the product didn’t run or migrate when they put it on. “What was really nice about this system from KARNAK was the high-solids silicone, even with the angle of the roof, the coating just stayed there, so we could really get our millage,” notes Scelzi. “On this job, we even exceeded it in some areas, which was good.”

For the 20-year specification, the coating was applied at a rate of 3 gallons per square, or 46 dry mils. As they put the coating down with rollers, crew members constantly checked the thickness with a mil gauge. After the project was completed, destructive testing confirmed the proper mil thickness was achieved, and then the test areas were repaired.

Smooth Operation

Weather was a concern, as rain, dew and fog are common in the area. “We had a couple of days we had to stand down due to the weather, but other than that, the project went very smoothly,” Scelzi says. “It really shows you what coatings are supposed to do — make it more friendly for the building owners and for the applicators who put it down.”

It also minimizes disruption for the residents. “We had some material we had to stack in certain areas, but the residents never even knew we were there unless they saw that material,” Scelzi says.

Prussel points out that coating applications also pose less liability for owners, as the roof area is never exposed to the weather, as it would be during a tear-off. “With a coating, there is never a liability of an open roof, and especially in Florida in summertime, you never know when you’re going to get some rain.”

Feedback on the job has been positive, notes Scelzi. “The owners, property manager and board members are very happy,” he says. “It’s a nice, clean-looking product and there are no seams. It’s a monolithic system. They are very pleased with the result, and it cost a lot less than a roof replacement.”

The project included a contract for an annual maintenance program. According to Prussel, proper maintenance not only safeguards the warranty, it can save owners money in the long run by ensuring the likelihood that the roof will be a good candidate for another coating application when the warranty period nears its expiration.

“Whenever we do a presentation for a building owner, a board, or a property manager, we always stress the importance of maintenance,” Prussel says. “It’s extremely vital to any roofing project, be it a coating or a new membrane, that a certified applicator of that manufacturer observe the roof a minimum of once a year, maintain it, make any repairs, and make a report for the owner.”

Scelzi and Prussel believe that teamwork between the manufacturer and the contractor is essential at every phase of the job. “As the manufacturer working with the applicator, we have a technical support team that can advise the applicator which product would be the best fit for that substrate,” says Prussel. “We are there to specifically design a system that is the best fit for the owner of that building, and we can advise the contractor on the application, and they can lay out the best option for that customer. We want to make sure our product will work, our product will last, and everybody will be happy.”

Scelzi agrees. “It gives the customer a good feeling to know they have a quality contractor and a quality manufacturer standing behind them,” he says.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Munyan Restoration Waterproofing and Painting Service of Tampa Bay Inc., Clearwater, Florida, www.munyanpainting.com

MATERIALS

Roof Coating: Karna-Sil 670 high-solids silicone, KARNAK, www.karnakcorp.com

Primer: 180 Karna-Sil Epoxy Primer, KARNAK

Repair Mastic: Karna-Flex 505 WB, KARNAK

Cleaning Agent: 799 Wash-N-Prep, KARNAK

Contractor Shows Versatility During Spectrum Field Restoration

Spectrum Field in Clearwater, Florida, is home to the Philadelphia Phillies in spring training and its minor league affiliate, the Clearwater Threshers. TarHeel Roofing replaced the main roof and restored and waterproofed the walls. Photo: TarHeel Corporation

TarHeel Corporation was founded as TarHeel Roofing in 1981. Headquartered in St. Petersburg, Florida, the company specializes in commercial work including roofing, waterproofing, cladding, damp proofing, exterior renovations, lightning protection and sheet metal. According to John Looney, president and owner of TarHeel Corporation, the company’s name was changed to better reflect its ability to work on the entire building envelope, including above- and below-grade waterproofing. 

When nearby Spectrum Field needed roofing and waterproofing work, Looney saw the project as a perfect opportunity to show off the company’s versatility. The stadium is home to the Philadelphia Phillies during spring training, and it also serves as the home field for the team’s minor league affiliate, the Clearwater Threshers. “We’ve done a lot of sports complexes in the past,” notes Looney. 

TarHeel Roofing restored the roof two years ago, and this year the company waterproofed the walls. The scopes of work included cold-applied roofing, waterproofing, caulking, and glazing, as well as repairing the tie-ins to pedestrian deck areas. “There were a lot of little pieces here that were right in our wheelhouse,” Looney says. 

Roofs and Walls

When the stadium’s existing modified bitumen roof reached the end of its service life, the decision was made to restore it with Garland’s Energizer K Plus FR. “We used Garland’s Energizer system, a cold-applied system with polyester mesh and granule surfacing on it,” Looney notes. 

The roof was restored with Garland’s Energizer K Plus FR system, a cold-applied roofing restoration system with granular surfacing. Photo: The Garland Company Inc.

Some perimeter areas of the roof were removed and repaired after an infrared scan was used to detect any moisture, and then the entire roof surface was cleaned and primed. The fluid-applied system is installed in two coats with a polyester or fiberglass scrim sheet fully adhered into it. Immediately after the second coat, granules are broadcast over the entire surface. “The finished product is very good-looking,” says Looney. 

Work on the vertical surfaces began in September 2018. The complex features walls clad in an exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS), as well as concrete and concrete masonry unit (CMU) walls. “The EIFS, concrete, and CMU walls each required a different application, but the basic scope of work is the same for each, with some variations,” Looney says. 

The walls were first cleaned and repaired. After the walls were pressure washed, crews repaired and replaced caulking at windows, doors and other penetrations. Cracks were filled using Garland’s Green-Lock Sealant XL, a polyether joint sealant with no VOCs. “We took care of cracks in the concrete and any breaks, including damage from baseballs hitting it,” Looney says. “Once the surface was repaired, we moved on the coating application.”

Crews applied Garland’s Tuff-Coat acrylic architectural wall coating. The coating can be applied with either a sprayer or rollers. Both methods were used on the project, but the majority of the work was done with rollers. The tan color was a crucial concern for the owners, and up-front testing ensured the tint would match up perfectly on the various substrates. “There was also some striping involved for aesthetics,” notes Looney. “We put on a band of a darker accent color.”

Crews from TarHeel Roofing cleaned and repaired the walls and waterproofed them with Garland’s Tuff-Coat acrylic architectural wall coating. Photo: TarHeel Corporation

The schedule was sometimes adjusted to accommodate concerts and other events. “The most unusual thing is the actual use of the building, obviously, being a baseball park with a lot of public access,” he says. “It takes a beating from all of the use and people there.”

Accessing some of the wall areas on the site was the biggest challenge on the project, according to Looney. “If you can picture the typical ballfield, you’ve got anything from ground-level vertical walls up to walls tucked behind seating up in the grandstand,” he explains. “Logistically, the challenge was getting access to all of the areas, extending from public concourses all the way up to the owner’s boxes and suites. A lot of that work was done from ground level, actually out on the field, reaching up with big Hi-Los that extended over two or three sections of seating.”

When figuring out the best approach, safety is always the primary concern. “Safety is a big part of any project, beginning with preparation and layout,” Looney says. “Once we were awarded the job, we weighed working from ladders, swing stages, and man lifts. In this project, we opted to do most of it from man lifts because of the safety concerns inherent in working from ladders, swing stages, or even scaffolding in some of these areas.” 

Major-league workmanship is the key to earning repeat business, says Looney. “We don’t do much advertising,” he says. “To us, that means every job has to be done well enough to be asked back. We pay a lot of attention to the details, including safety and the setup. To us, the finished product has to be great — that’s a given — but also the journey, from the start to the completion, is important as well. We do a lot of work on hospitals, health care areas, and industrial sites where us being in the way really isn’t an option. We are very familiar with working around the needs of businesses. So from a logistics and detail point of view, we are very sensitive to making sure the ride is as good as it can be.”

TEAM

Roofing and Waterproofing Contractor: TarHeel Corporation, St. Petersburg, Florida, www.tarheelcorp.com

MATERIALS 

Roof Restoration System: Energizer K Plus FR, The Garland Company Inc., www.garlandco.com

Wall Coating: Tuff-Coat, The Garland Company Inc.

Joint Sealant: Green-Lock Sealant XL, The Garland Company Inc.

Project Profiles: Historic Preservation

CATHEDRAL OF ST. PAUL, BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

Team

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: Midland Engineering Co., South
Bend, Ind.
ARCHITECT: ArchitectureWorks LLP, Birmingham
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Hoar Construction LLC, Birmingham,
MASONRY CONTRACTOR: Ziolkowski Construction Inc., South Bend

The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles.

The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles.

Roof Materials

The Catholic Archdiocese of Birmingham required the cathedral’s new roof system be a historically accurate reproduction of the original in materials, design and craftsmanship. The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles. Six large slate crosses and multiple accent patterns, barely visible on the faded original roof, required exacting measurements prior to tear-off and a high level of precision to recreate and maintain over such a large field and on octagonal steeples.

Because of metal thinning brought on by their advanced age, every copper architectural and functional feature in the existing roof system had to be carefully removed and shipped to Midland Engineering’s South Bend facility to be historically replicated in its metal shop. This included seven ornate crosses (up to 17-feet tall), finials, turret caps and more. There were more than four dozen components, for which no original prints existed, as well as over 500 feet each of custom copper cornices and radius gutters with matching straps. More than 20,000 square feet of 16- and 20-ounce copper was utilized for fabrication of architectural elements and flashing.

Midland Engineering was asked to make improvements to the original roof system to improve attic ventilation while maintaining the Gothic Revival period look. To accomplish this, the crew integrated bronze screen (invisible from the ground) into the original copper cornice and eave design to provide improved cold air intake while new louvered copper dormers replaced the original painted roof ventilator.

An updated lightning protection system was incorporated into the new roof design, hidden within many of the new copper crosses and other architectural elements. The system was fabricated in Midland Engineering’s shop to maintain the Gothic Revival look.

The metal shop also clad 10 previously painted windows and mullions in copper, effectively eliminating frequent and costly maintenance. These windows, reachable only by crane at considerable expense, formerly required painting and other maintenance every five to seven years.

About 6,500 square feet of lead-coated copper, which patinas to a limestone color, was utilized to cap all limestone exposed to weather, reducing ongoing maintenance of limestone joints.

Extensive termite damage to structural framing required repair prior to installation of the new roofing system. Upon removal of the original slate roof and completion of the structural repairs, the new roof was dried-in and installation of the new slate roof began. The historically accurate replacements of the original copper architectural features were installed according to schedule.

SLATE SUPPLIER: North Country Slate
COPPER SUPPLIER: Hussey Copper

Roof Report

The Cathedral of St. Paul is the centerpiece of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Birmingham. Completed in 1893 at a cost of $90,000, the cathedral is widely considered to be a handsome example of the American Neo-Gothic variant of the Gothic Revival style. The cathedral measures 96-feet wide by 140-feet long and encompasses more than 60,000 square feet. It features twin octagonal steeples, rising 183-feet high.

Work schedules on this project were a challenge. The contract required parishioner and clergy access to the church must be maintained 24 hours a day, seven days a week, throughout the eight-month duration of the project. Further, because of the noise inherent in roof construction, work schedules had to be planned around regular church services and events and rescheduled several times a month for funerals and other unscheduled events.

“We could not have been more pleased with the work accomplished by the team from Midland Engineering,” says Very Rev. Kevin M. Bazzel, V.G., J.C.L., rector of the Cathedral of St. Paul. “It is a marvel to us to be able to see the church in its original glory, and all of this thanks to Midland!”

The National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, Ill., awarded Midland Engineering the prestigious Gold Circle Award in 2016. Midland was recognized in the Outstanding Workmanship—Steep-slope Category.

Photo: Rob Culpepper

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RCI Announces Speakers for October Building Envelope Technology Symposium

Raleigh, N.C.-based RCI Inc. has assembled a panel of expert speakers to discuss methods for designing sound building exteriors. More than 300 building designers and construction professionals are expected to be in attendance at the association’s annual Building Envelope Technology Symposium, which will be held Oct. 17-18 at the Westin Galleria Houston, Texas.

The program features 12 educational sessions presented by leading building envelope designers. Speakers offer their experience-based insight for specification of sound, durable exterior enve- lopes. Most programs focus on repair and/or sustainable design methods for strengthening and improving existing structures.

Attendees can earn up to 12 continuing-education credits from RCI and the American Institute of Architects, Washington, D.C. An evening reception after the close of the first day’s meeting will allow those in attendance to network and mingle with fellow professionals.

This year’s topics and speakers include:

The Performance of Weather-Resistant Barriers in Stucco Assemblies
Karim P. Allana, RRC, RWC, P.E. | Allana Buick & Bers Inc., Palo Alto, Calif.

Aluminum Windowsill Anchors and Supplemental Waterproof Flashing Design Practices
Rocco Romero, AIA | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates Inc., Seattle

The Ideal Third-party Warranty: A Risk-managed Approach
Lorne Ricketts, P.Eng. | RDH Building Science Inc., Vancouver

Playing Against a Stacked Deck: Restoration of a Stone Fin Façade
Matthew C. Farmer, P.E. | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Fairfax, Va.

Everyone Loves a Pool, But What’s Lurking Beneath the Surface?
Rob Holmer, P.E., GE | Terracon Consulting Engineers, Sacramento, Calif.
Michael Phifer | Terracon Consulting Engineers, Sacramento

Design Principles for Tower and Steeple Restoration
Robert L. Fulmer | Fulmer Associates Building Exterior Consultants LLC, North Conway, N.H.

When the Numbers Don’t Work: Engineering Judgement Tips for Historical Buildings
Rachel L. Will, P.E. | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Chicago
Edward A. Gerns, RA, LEED AP | Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Chicago

Air Barrier Integration: Don’t Entangle Yourself with These Common Pitfalls
Timothy A. Mills, P.E., LEED AP, CIT | TAM Consultants Inc., Williamsburg, Va.

Upgrading the Performance of Heritage Windows to Suit Modern Design Conditions
Scott Tomlinson, P.Eng. | Morrison Hershfield, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Design Considerations for Renewing Podium Waterproofing
Bereket Alazar, RRO, LEED AP BD+C | Morrison Hershfield, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Stéphane P. Hoffman, P.E. | Morrison Hershfield, Seattle

Fully Soldered Metal Roofing: More Complicated Than You Think
Nicholas T. Floyd, P.E., LEED AP | Simpson Gumpertz & Heger Inc., Waltham, Mass.

A Case History of ETFE on Today’s Projects
Lee Durston | Morrison Hershfield, St. Paul, Minn.
Shawn Robinson | Morrison Hershfield, Atlanta

For more information, visit RCI’s website, or call (800) 828-1902.

Restore Domes with 22-karat Gold Restoration Film

RealGold Inc. announces a new, cost-effective 20-plus-year 22-Karat Gold Dome Restoration Film.

RealGold Inc. announces a new, cost-effective 20-plus-year 22-Karat Gold Dome Restoration Film.

RealGold Inc., a manufacturer of genuine gold and silver exterior-grade products, announces a new, cost-effective 20-plus-year 22-Karat Gold Dome Restoration Film.

Used to beautify church domes throughout the U.S., Europe and Asia, the 22-karat gold film features a 20-plus-year outdoor warranty. Guaranteed non-fading and non-delaminating for 20 years, the maintenance-free exterior grade of the gold film is durable and features a non-stick surface resistant to airborne contaminants and fowl waste.

The 22-Karat Gold Dome Restoration Film features a permanent self-adhesive application process, costing a fraction of traditional hand-applied gold leaf. It far outlasts gold-colored paints, which are prone to fading and peeling.

For a free estimate of RealGold’s 22-Karat Gold Dome Restoration Film, interested parties are invited to email the height and base diameter measurements of the dome, along with photographs of the dome highlighting two sides, to billcrowley@realgoldinc.com.

With Today’s ‘New Age’ Roofs, Removing All System Components May Not Always Be Required or in the Clients’ Best Interest

Years ago, reroofing design involved removing all roof-system components down to the roof deck and rebuilding a new roof system up from there.

PHOTO 1: This EPDM roof’s service has been extended for nine years and counting, approaching 30 years in-situ performance. Here, the restoration of perimeter gravel- stop flashing and lap seams, as well as detailing of roof drains, penetrations and roof curbs, is nearing completion.

PHOTO 1: This EPDM roof’s service has been extended for nine years and counting, approaching 30 years in-situ performance. Here, the restoration of perimeter gravel- stop flashing and lap seams, as well as detailing of roof drains, penetrations and roof curbs, is nearing completion.

Although that is still a viable option and often performed, the coming of age of many single-membrane roofs has altered the method of installing a new reroof system. Options now include EPDM roof restoration; removal of the roof membrane and the addition of new insulation and roof membrane; using the existing roof membrane as a vapor retarder and adding new insulation and roof membrane; removal of the roof cover and installation of new, leaving all the existing insulation in place.

When I first moved into roof-system replacement design some 35 years ago, the dominant roof systems being removed were bituminous, specifically gravel-surfaced asphaltic and coal- tar-pitch built-up roofs. As they aged, their surfaces often started to blister, crack and undulate with ridges—surfaces often unsuitable for roof recover. The bitumen often was deteriorating because of ultraviolet-light exposure; when that occurred, the deterioration of the felts was not far behind. The insulation was mostly perlite or high-density wood fiber; the amount was minimal (low thermal value) and, more often than not, flat or with very minimal slope. Drains were erratically placed, tapered insulation was not often the case and roof edges were predominately gravel stops. In the Midwest, many roof decks were cementitious wood fiber. The roof covers were often patched again and again, even as water infiltrated the system.

PHOTO 2: The re-flashing of roof curbs is an integral part of the restoration of EPDM roof membranes.

PHOTO 2: The re-flashing of roof curbs is an integral part of the restoration of EPDM roof membranes.

When replacement was necessary, the roof-edge sheet metal was removed; the entire existing roof system was removed down to the roof deck; and a new roof system was designed, often incorporating vapor retarders/temporary roofs so the removal of multiple layers of roofing could be accomplished, roof curbs raised, and enhancements of roof drains, curbs and roof edge could occur prior to the installation of the new roof cover. Tapered insulation designs be- came common; this would often require realignment of the roof drains to simplify the tapered design and installation. To accommodate the new insulation thickness, the roof edge had to be raised as did roof curbs, RTU curbs, plumbing vents and roof drains via extensions. Roof membranes changed from bituminous to those classified as “single plies”: EPDM, PVC, CPE, CSPE.

These new roof-system replacement designs resulted in superior roofs—85 percent of all the reroofs I have designed are still in place, still performing, still saving the owner money. Life cycles have moved from eight to 12 years, up to 18 to 25 years and longer. They certainly were more expensive than the original installation and, if a roof designer didn’t have a handle on costs to provide the owner with estimated costs of construction, were often shocking. But these roof systems were good for the client, economy, environment and public.

PHOTO 3: When restoring EPDM roof membranes, the removal of roof penetration flashings and installation of new with target patches will provide another 20 years of watertight protection.

PHOTO 3: When restoring EPDM roof membranes, the removal of roof penetration flashings and installation of new with target patches will provide another 20 years of watertight protection.

Over the years, codes and standards have changed, especially in the past decade, requiring increased insulation values and roof-edge sheet-metal compliance with greater attention to wind-uplift resistance. As the new millennium arrived, these “new age” roofs came of age and owners started to look at their replacement—often with increased costs stifling their budgets.

LEAN THINKING

A factor that increased the performance of many roof systems in the past 20 years was the emergence and growth of the professional roof consultant, often degreed in architecture or engineering, educated in roofing, tested and certified. These professionals brought a scientific approach to roof-system design. Raleigh, N.C.-based RCI Inc. (formerly Roof Consultants Institute) was the conduit for this increased level of knowledge, professionalism and the growth in quality roof-system design and installation.

PHOTO 4: On this roof, the existing loose-laid membrane was removed, open insulation joints filled with spray-foam insulation and new insulation added to meet current code requirements. A new 90-mil EPDM membrane was installed and existing ballast moved onto it to 10-pounds-per-square-foot coverage.

PHOTO 4: On this roof, the existing loose-laid membrane was removed, open insulation joints filled with spray-foam insulation and new insulation added to meet current code requirements. A new 90-mil EPDM membrane was installed and existing ballast moved onto it to 10-pounds-per-square-foot coverage.

As these professionals started to examine the older “new age” roofs, those whose first responsibility was doing what was best for the client saw greater opportunity than just a costly full-roof replacement. Although many roofs today still need to be fully removed, prudent professionals see other opportunities, such as the following:

ROOF RESTORATION
EPDM membrane ages with little change in physical characteristics as opposed to its built-up roofing predecessor; therefore, EPDM membranes often can be “restored” in lieu of removing and replacing the roof. (Studies to support the lack of change in EPDM’s physical characteristics while it ages include Gish, 1992; Trial, 2004; and ERA, 2010.)

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Western Colloid Announces Territory Sales Manager

Western Colloid has announced the addition of Rick Boyce as territory sales manager for Texas and the Midwest.

Rick brings with him extensive experience in roofing with more than 40 years in contracting and manufacturing. “His knowledge of different types of roofing systems as well as the installation and restoration challenges that can come up on a roofing project make him the perfect addition to the Western Colloid team.” says Greg Hlavaty, general manager. “Rick brings skills that are very important to Western Colloid, such as the ability to provide solutions for the contractor.”

Rick will be responsible for promoting Western Colloid products, helping establish a distribution center in the Dallas/Fort Worth area, and developing relationships with contractors, specifiers and building owners throughout the region.

“Although we have been previously seen as a western states-based manufacturer, the last few years have shown increased demand throughout the U.S. An expansion into Texas is a natural next step for us.” says Hlavaty. “We feel very fortunate that Rick agreed to be part of our team and we look forward to building our business in the state of Texas.”