Zinc Roof and Wall Panels Add Sense of Movement to Chicago Boathouse Project

The Eleanor Boathouse at Park 571 is the last of four new boathouses and river launches created by the Chicago Park District to reclaim the Chicago River for water-based recreation. Photos: Courtesy Studio Gang, © Tom Harris

The new Eleanor Boathouse at Park 571 in Chicago’s Bridgeport neighborhood creates the opportunity for greater community recreation and environmental stewardship of the Chicago River. Designed by Studio Gang Architects, the 19,000 square-foot facility is the last of four new boathouses and river launches created by the Chicago Park District to reclaim the Chicago River as a major system of parks and water-based recreation.

The unique form of the two-building boathouse reflects the movement of rowing, according to Studio Gang’s founding principal Jeanne Gang. The design, incorporating alternating roof trusses, was influenced by studying the rhythm and motion of rowing. “The Chicago River boathouses are part of a new environmentally friendly vision for the city’s river,” says Gang. “By making the riverfront a destination for recreation, anchored by dynamic sustainable architecture, we hope to catalyze long-term stewardship and support of the river’s remediation.”

The striking design incorporates zinc panels from Rheinzink in both roof and facade applications. Approximately 23,000 square feet of Rheinzink prePATINA blue-grey Double Lock Standing Seam Panels cover the roof of both buildings. An additional 10,000 square feet of the company’s Flat Lock Tiles clad the facade in a diagonal installation.

Zinc panels were also used to clad one of the other four boathouses completed earlier and also designed by Studio Gang Architects. The WMS Boathouse at Clark Park on the northwest side of the city was the second of the new boathouses to open and utilized 7,000 square feet of vertically-oriented Rheinzink Flat-Lock Tiles for the facade.

The unique form of the 19,000 square-foot facility was designed to reflect the movement of rowing. Photos: Courtesy Studio Gang, © Tom Harris

The panels for both projects were fabricated by Rheinzink systems partner Sheet Metal Supply Ltd. (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois. Installation of the panels on the Eleanor Boathouse was done by Bennett & Brosseau, Inc., Romeoville, Illinois.

The panels chosen for the project were the result of an exhaustive search that ruled out more expensive alternatives. “Rheinzink reduced the cost and provided the great diagonal look that Studio Gang wanted,” says Bennett & Brosseau project manager Ryan Broom. “It’s a ‘full zinc’ job with both the facade and the roof and really turned out nice.”

SMS vice president Ben Kweton credits Broom with providing the invitation to become involved in the project. “When Bennett & Brosseau approached us with the value engineering opportunity, we jumped at the chance to provide pricing and to remind the design team of the success of Rheinzink on the earlier boathouse project,” Kweton says.

The design team also opted for a slightly hybrid version of traditional flat lock panels. “The tiles we fabricated had a slight offset at the top to bring the panel overlaps more into plane and to create a slight reveal,” Kweton says.

Broom finds working with zinc rewarding, noting, “It provides a great quality look and allows more architectural detailing than can be done with many other metals.”

TEAM

Architect: Studio Gang Architects, Chicago, www.studiogang.com
Metal Fabricator: Sheet Metal Supply Ltd. (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois, www.sheetmetalsupplyltd.com
Installer: Bennett & Brosseau, Inc., Romeoville, Illinois, www.bennettandbrosseau.com

MATERIALS

Roof Panels: prePATINA blue-grey Double Lock Standing Seam Panels, Rheinzink, www.rheinzink.us
Wall Panels: Flat Lock Tiles, Rheinzink

Standing Seam Metal Roof Is the Natural Choice for New Cottage in Wisconsin

A standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels was the natural choice to clad the roof of This new construction project in the North Woods of Wisconsin features a standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels. Photos: RHEINZINK

A standing seam metal roof comprised of zinc panels was the natural choice to clad the roof of a new cottage located in the North Woods of Wisconsin. Approximately 2,500 square feet of RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels met the owner’s criteria. “The multi-level roof was a key part of the design and we wanted it to blend into the environment as much as possible,” the owner says. “You won’t find another material that looks as natural and exquisite as RHEINZINK.”

The prePATINA blue-grey panels were fabricated by RHEINZINK systems partner Sheet Metal Supply (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois. The installation team was led by Lou Rondeau of Natural Metal Associates, Mont Vernon, New Hampshire. Rondeau is an experienced zinc craftsman and instructor in fabrication techniques. He was assisted by Craig Hardin of Hardin Construction, Union Bridge, Maryland, and Chad Wolbert of W&W Construction, Williamsport, Maryland. The three men were on the job for five days. The general contractor on the project was Rod Flohr Construction, LLC, Tomahawk, Wisconsin.

“Rondeau did a fantastic job on the installation, including some beautiful detailing,” the owner says. He specifically mentioned the crescent seams at the eaves. “It’s a designer detail,” according to Rondeau. “Most guys will do a straight up and down 90-

Approximately 2,500 square feet of RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels were used to construct the roof. Photos: RHEINZINK

degree edge. But we like to spend a little extra time on the detailing and seaming. RHEINZINK can last a lifetime so it’s important to make the appearance as classic and timeless as possible. I really like working with the qualities and craftsmanship associated with it.”

Overall, the job was relatively straightforward, according to Rondeau. “The greatest challenge was getting to the site in the North Woods,” he says. “But the cottage turned out to be a real gem in that wilderness environment.”

TEAM

Metal Fabricator: Sheet Metal Supply (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois, www.sheetmetalsupplyltd.com
Roofing Contractors: Natural Metal Associates, Mont Vernon, New Hampshire,
www.facebook.com/Natural-Metals-Associates-228362561021655/
Hardin Construction, Union Bridge, Maryland, hardinconstructionllc.com
W&W Construction, Williamsport, Maryland,
www.facebook.com/WW-Construction-LLC-430340303795069/

MATERIALS

Metal Panels: RHEINZINK Double Lock Standing Seam Panels in prePATINA blue-grey, RHEINZINK, www.rheinzink.us

Rheinzink Offers Updated CEU Course

Rheinzink America is offering an updated AIA-approved CEU course explaining the use of its zinc alloy in various architectural applications. The course offers 1.00 AIA LU/HSW Learning Unit and 1.00 GBCI Continuing Education Unit. The course credits fulfill requirements for both AIA and GBCI and is available through Hanley Wood University. The title of the course is: “Sustainable Application and Design using Titanium Zinc Roofing and Cladding.” The CEU units are also available through a “lunch and learn” presentation given by Rheinzink regional sales managers.

The course and presentation include an explanation of the environmental aspects of zinc, the attributes of architectural zinc, and a description of the metal’s properties, aesthetics, technical aspects, and design applications. Also included is a description of typical roofing and cladding profiles and an explanation of the patina process that is one of zinc’s most distinguishing characteristics.

To schedule a presentation in your office, call 781-729-0812, or for more information on Rheinzink, visit www.rheinzink.us.

Zinc Tiles Make Roof the Focal Point of Historic Residential Renovation

Originally built in 1853, this historic residence was recently renovated. The 1,870-square-foot cottage was designed to offer a highly contemporary flair while retaining many of its historic elements. Photos: RHEINZINK

Prior to its near-total reconstruction, the Jett Residence was an overgrown structure hidden in a grove of trees in Iowa City, Iowa. The strikingly renovated cottage now serves as a retreat house for its owners. Originally built in 1853, the residence retains a significant portion of the original, locally made red brick. An original, vaulted stone root cellar — rumored to have been part of the Underground Railroad — also remains on the property.

The owners were deeply involved in working with Neumann Monson Architects, Iowa City, in planning the renovation, according to co-owner Bobby Jett. The interior design of the 1,870-square-foot cottage offers a highly contemporary flair within the historic setting.

The most prominent feature of the exterior is the roof. “Everyone loves the roof,” Jett says. “They’ve never seen anything like it.” Approximately 2,500 square feet of RHEINZINK Square Tiles were utilized. The 0.8mm prePATINA blue-grey Square Tiles were installed in a diamond pattern.

The selection of the tiles was inspired by an old black and white photo of the house taken more half a century ago. “At that time, the roof of the house had diamond-shaped shingles. We wanted to replicate that look,” notes Jett. “The architect suggested that RHEINZINK could provide the look and durability we wanted.”

“We definitely wanted to replicate the roof’s visual pattern that we saw in the old photo but obviously wanted it to have more permanence and durability,” says Tim Schroeder, vice president at Neumann Monson Architects. “We’ve worked with zinc before and thought it would be a good complement to the dormers that would provide a nice crisp appearance. The RHEINZINK was definitely a nod to the historic element but provided a progressive look as well.”

Fabrication of the Square Tiles was done by RHEINZINK systems partner Sheet Metal Supply (SMS), headquartered in Mundelein, Illinois.

The restored roof is comprised of approximately 2,500 square feet of RHEINZINK Square Tiles, which were installed in a diamond pattern. Photos: RHEINZINK

Installation of the RHEINZINK Square Tiles was performed by Natural Metal Associates, Mont Vernon, New Hampshire. The owner of Natural Metal Associates, Lou Rondeau, has extensive hands-on experience with zinc fabrication methods and techniques. “I knew this was a unique project and I really wanted to be a part of it,” Rondeau notes. Rondeau was accompanied by an apprentice and personally did the hand-cutting and folding associated with detailing the valleys and edges. The work also included installation of the RHEINZINK half-round 5 ½-inch gutter system.

The installation was completed in nine days, according to Rondeau. “Zinc is a premium material that’s a real pleasure to work with,” he says.

TEAM

Architect: Neumann Monson Architects, Iowa City, Iowa, www.neumannmonson.com
Metal Fabricator: Sheet Metal Supply (SMS), Mundelein, Illinois, www.sheetmetalsupplyltd.com
Metal Roof Manufacturer: RHEINZINK, Woburn, Massachusetts, www.rheinzink.us
Roofing Contractor: Natural Metal Associates, Mont Vernon, New Hampshire, www.facebook.com/Natural-Metals-Associates-228362561021655/

Project Profiles: Education Facilities

Maury Hall, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.

TEAM

Roofing Contractor: Wagner Roofing, Hyattsville, Md.
General Contractor: C.E.R. Inc., Baltimore, (410) 247-9096

The project included 34 dormers that feature double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal.

The project included 34 dormers that feature double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal.

ROOF MATERIALS

Wagner Roofing was awarded the complete replacement of all roof systems. These included an upper double-lock standing-seam copper roof system, a bullnose copper cornice transition, slate mansard, 34 dormers with double-lock standing-seam copper and fascia metal, eight copper hip metal caps and a continuous built-in gutter with decorative copper fascia. Each of the dormers also had a copper window well.

The upper standing-seam roof was removed and replaced with 24-inch-wide, 20-ounce copper coil rollformed into 1-inch-high by 21-inch-wide continuous standing-seam panels that matched the original profile. The eave bullnose, which also served as the mansard flashing, was removed and returned to Wagner Roofing’s shop where it was replicated to match the exact size and profile.

The 34 dormer roofs were replaced with 20-inch-wide, 20-ounce copper coil formed into 1-inch-high by 17-inch- wide continuous standing-seam panels. The decorative ornate fascia of the dormers was carefully removed and Wagner’s skilled craftsmen used it as a template to develop the new two-piece copper cornice to which the roof panels locked. The cheeks and face of the dormers were also re-clad with custom-fabricated 20-ounce copper.

The oversized built-in-gutter at the base of the slate mansard was removed and replaced with a new 20-ounce copper liner custom-formed and soldered onsite. The replacement included a specialty “bull-nosed” drip edge at the base of the slate and an ornate, custom-formed fascia on the exterior of the built-in gutter. The decorative copper fascia included 85 “hubcaps”, 152 “half wheels” and 14 decorative pressed-copper miters. The original hubcap and half-wheel ornaments were broken down and patterns were replicated. Each ornamental piece was hand assembled from a pattern of 14 individual pieces of 20-ounce copper before being installed at their precise original location on the new fascia. The miters were made by six different molds, taken from the original worn pieces, to stamp the design into 20-ounce sheet copper.

In all, more than 43,000 pounds of 20-ounce copper was used on the project.

Copper Manufacturer: Revere Copper Products

ROOF REPORT

Maury Hall was built in 1907 and was designed by Ernest Flagg. Flagg designed many of the buildings at the U.S. Naval Academy, including the Chapel, Bancroft Hall, Mahan Hall, the superintendent’s residence and Sampson Hall. His career was largely influenced by his studies at École des Beaux-Arts, Paris. Examples of Flagg’s Beaux-Arts influence can be found in the decorative copper adorning the built-in gutter on building designs.

Maury Hall currently houses the departments of Weapons and Systems Engineering and Electrical Engineering. The building sits in a courtyard connected to Mahan Hall and across from its design twin, Sampson Hall.

PHOTO: Joe Guido

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