RICOWI to Host Underlayment Seminar on March 17

The underlayment systems play a vital role in today’s roof designs for long-term performance. The challenges of selecting the right materials, application techniques and performance criteria can be challenging to the roofing professional. RICOWI‘s Spring Seminar, which will be held March 17, 2017, in Anaheim, Calif., will provide an in-depth look at the two styles of underlayments—organic and synthetic—that might be used in low- and steep-slope roof designs. This seminar will touch upon the product designs, product approvals and code language that address how to select and properly use these various underlayment products in roof system applications.

Underlayment Speakers
Organic Underlayment: Doug Thagard, Fontana Paper Mills
Synthetic Underlayment: Mark Strait, Synthetic Roof Underlayment Institute

When underlayments are installed as part of a roof system, they may have special requirements for how they are designed, selected and installed to meet the anticipated roof performance. To better understand the relationship of the components, the speakers will cover the various styles of roof applications that will help inform the audience of best practices from the various industry associations.

Association Speakers
Low-slope Underlayment Applications: Mike Ennis, SPRI
Steep-slope Underlayment Applications:

For more information, visit RICOWI’s website or contact Joan Cook, executive director, at (330) 671-4569.

RICOWI Provides Unbiased Research on Recent Hail Damage

Each time weather reports and news stories warn of impending heavy rains and hail, the Hail Investigation Program (HIP) Committee of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues (RICOWI) Inc., Clinton, Ohio, begins a process to determine whether the hail damage is sufficient to meet the HIP requirements for deployment of volunteer research teams.

Before the daily assignments began, the volunteers reviewed the various research requirements, met their team members and learned their responsibilities.

Before the daily assignments began, the volunteers reviewed the various research requirements, met their team members and learned their responsibilities.

Mobilization criteria is met when “An event is identified as a hailstorm with hail stones greater than 1 1/2 inches in diameter causing significant damage covering an area of 5 square miles or more on one of the target- ed areas.” Once a storm that meets the criteria has been confirmed and meteorological data and local input have been obtained by HIP, a conference call with RICOWI’s Executive Committee is held to discuss HIP’s recommendation and review information. The Executive Committee decides whether to deploy.

On April 11, 2016, the hailstorm that damaged the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex met the requirements for mobilization.

RESEARCH TEAMS AND BUILDINGS

Volunteer recruitment is an ongoing process throughout the year. RICOWI members are encouraged to volunteer as a deployment team member by completing forms online or at HIP committee meetings held twice a year in conjunction with RICOWI seminars and meetings.

Once a deployment is called, an email is sent to RICOWI members to alert the volunteers and encourage new volunteers. RICOWI sponsoring organizations also promote the investigation to their memberships. Volunteers are a mixture of new and returning personnel.

On May 2, 2016, 30 industry professionals traveled from across the U.S. to assemble in Texas. These volunteers were alerted to bring their trucks, ladders and safety equipment. To provide an impartial review, 10 teams of three volunteers were balanced with roofing material representatives, roofing consultants or engineers, meteorologists, contractors and researchers. Team members volunteered to be their team’s photographer, data collector or team leader.

When the deployment was called, press releases were sent to various media in the Dallas/Fort Worth area to alert local companies and homeowners of the research investigation. RICOWI staff began making calls immediately to the local area’s government officials to seek approval for the investigation teams to conduct research. Staff also made calls throughout the research week to help identify additional buildings.

A large area in and around Wylie, Texas, had hail as large as 4 inches in diameter.

A large area in and around Wylie, Texas, had hail as large as 4 inches in diameter.

Several methods are used to help determine which areas and roofs are chosen. A list of building permits were provided to RICOWI by local building officials to assist with roof choice. In addition, one of RICOWI’s members from the area did preliminary research and provided addresses for the teams. These site owners were contacted through phone and email to notify them of the research project.

Teams were assigned low- or steep- slope research and were assigned addresses accordingly. Team members carried copies of the press release and additional information to help introduce the investigation to business owners and homeowners.

Ultimately, the objective of the re- search project in Dallas/Fort Worth included the following:

  • Investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after this major hail event.
  • Factually describe roof assembly performance and modes of damage.
  • Formally report the results for substantiated hail events.

DAY-TO-DAY DUTIES

Before the daily assignments began, the volunteers reviewed the various research requirements, met their team members and learned their responsibilities. The teams were briefed on safety, how to take proper photos and how to capture important data.

As each day began, a briefing was held providing assignments for the day. This included addresses for investigation based on whether the team was focused on low- or steep-slope research. The teams were encouraged to stop at other homes and facilities that were undergoing roof repairs in addition to their assigned inspections.

The days were hot and long for the teams. Volunteers began each day at 8 a.m. and many did not return until 5 or 6 p.m., depending on the number of roofs they were assigned. The temperature during the day was around 80 F and humid; the temperatures on the roofs were much worse.

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The Roofing Industry Seeks to Protect Buildings from Storms

I used to love storms. I was never one to cower at the sound of thunder. I often found storms a good excuse to turn off the TV and lights, open the blinds and marvel at the sheer power of nature. If you read my January/February “Raise the Roof”, however, you know I have had a love-hate relationship with rain since moving in with my husband (we married in August 2015). I found myself awake on rainy nights, counting the seconds between pumps of our sump
pump. If less than 20 seconds passed, I knew the basement was flooding and dreaded the morning’s cleanup. (I work from home and my office is in the basement.)

In March, a waterproofing company spent two days installing its patented drain- age system and a new sump pump inside our basement. We monitored the system throughout the month of April, which was rainy, to ensure there were no leaks in the system. It worked like a charm! During April, we also hired contractors to create my new home office, a guestroom and walk-in closet within the basement. So far, we have new windows, lighting and insulation; the contractors are finishing up drywall and ceiling installation as I type.

I know what it’s like when you can’t trust your house to weather a storm. There’s nothing worse than feeling powerless, and seeing your belongings destroyed is gut-wrenching. As the nation braces against another summer of intense weather, it’s comforting to know the construction industry—specifically roofing—is researching and innovating to protect people’s homes and businesses from Mother Nature’s wrath.

For example, in “Business Sense”, Jared O. Blum, president of the Washington, D.C.-based Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association, writes about initiatives to improve the resiliency of our building stock and infrastructure through codes, standards and proactive design.

The Clinton, Ohio-based Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues Inc., better known as RICOWI, recently sent 30 researchers to the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex after an April hailstorm. According to Joan Cook, RICOWI’s executive director, the 10 teams of three inspected 3 million square feet of low and steep-slope roofing during the investigation. The teams’ findings will result in a report to help the industry better understand what causes roofs to perform or fail in severe hail events, leading to overall improvements in roof system durability. Learn how RICOWI mobilizes and studies roofs in “Special Report”.

There are many other stories within this issue about roof systems working along- side other building components to create durable, sustainable and energy-efficient buildings. Humans have a long history of innovating and evolving to meet the needs of their current situation. I have no doubt that in my lifetime our buildings will be built to withstand nearly any catastrophic event. Meanwhile, I’m happy to report we received 4 1/2 inches of rain in three hours last week and our basement remained bone dry. Thanks to innovations in basement waterproofing, I may start to enjoy storms just a bit again!

RICOWI Deploys Research Teams to Hail-damaged Areas

The Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues Inc. (RICOWI Inc.) has announced deployment of research teams to the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex hail-damaged areas. The teams will be conducting the investigation from May 2-6, 2016.

RICOWI is a non-profit international organization that has implemented a strategic plan for a Hail Investigation Program (HIP). The purpose of the research program is:

  • To investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major hail storms.
  • To factually describe roof assembly performance and modes of damage.
  • To formally report the results for substantiated hail events.

Hail Task Force Chair John Gimple says: “The data collected will provide unbiased detailed information on the hail resistance of low slope and steep slope roofing systems from credible investigative teams. We can expect a greater industry understanding of what causes roofs to perform or fail in hail storms, leading to overall improvements in roof system durability, the reduction of waste generation from re-roofing activities, and a reduction in insurance losses that will lead to lower overall costs for the public.”

RICOWI investigated the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex in 2011. During this investigation more than 100 hail-damaged roofs were included in the research. RICOWI Inc. is again reaching out to the local governments, businesses and the residents to help with this important research project by volunteering their hail damaged roofs for the research project. All information is kept confidential and is used strictly for research purposes. Reports of past research are available for no charge on the website.

The published findings will document roofing systems that fail or survive major hail events and provide educational materials for roofing professionals to design hail-resistant roofing systems.

RICOWI Seeks Speakers for 2016 Seminars

The Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues (RICOWI), Clinton, Ohio, is committed to providing in-depth and comprehensive education to identify and address important technical issues related to the cause of wind and weather damage to roofing systems. RICOWI’s research and education initiatives focus on providing a broad knowledge base regarding wind, hail, energy efficiency and durability effects; establishing new/improved consensus standard practices for weather design and testing; and providing an educational platform of roof design and weather concepts within the building community.

RICOWI is currently seeking speakers for its 2016 Seminars. This is your opportunity to showcase your research, lessons learned in the field and educate others about the effects of weather on roofing systems.

The seminars’ audience consists of architects/engineers, consultants, building owners/facility managers, manufacturers, distributors, foremen, superintendents, project managers, roofing contractors, code bodies and the insurance industry. Eight 45-minute education sessions will be chosen related to the following potential presentation topics:

  • Weather Damage Case Studies
  • Lessons Learned in the Field after Weather Events
  • Innovative Roofing Solutions to Wind and Hail Issues
  • Sustainable Roofing
  • Green Building Codes for Roofing
  • Design Details
  • Mitigation and Loss Prevention
  • Edge Metal
  • Maintenance and Repair Solutions
  • Green Detail
  • Secondary Details
  • Weather Modeling and Predictability
  • Fasteners and Fastening Systems
  • Above-sheathing Ventilation
  • Lightweight Concrete
  • Research and Development

RICOWI’s audience prefers presentations that are:

  • Timely and will have an impact on the industry.
  • Innovative solutions to problems.
  • Forward looking to potential industry issues and threats.
  • How-to classes that stimulate and provide attendees with a new skill, technology or process.
  • Stimulating and cutting-edge for the construction and roofing industry.
  • Proposals for a better understanding of processes and techniques.
  • Solid research and data from case studies.
  • Upcoming research.

Presenters should have strong speaking experience and in-depth knowledge of subject matter presented. Topics should be related to the audience and not generic in nature and should not be product pitches.

Submission forms with abstracts should be submitted no later than June 15, 2015, to the RICOWI offices. The forms are available online. The RICOWI Conference and Education Committee will review, and authors will be notified regarding the selection of an abstract by Sept. 1, 2015. Once accepted, authors for the Spring 2016 seminar will be required to have bios and finalized abstracts in by Nov. 1, 2015, for the preliminary agenda publication on the RICOWI website and for distribution. All presentations and handouts will be due from presenters no later than Feb. 15, 2016.

If you have questions regarding RICOWI’s Call for Abstracts, contact Joan Cook, RICOWI’s executive director, at (330) 671-4569, or email jcook@ricowi.com.