RCMA Recognizes OSHA Inaugural Safe and Sound Week

To show its commitment to safety and health programs, the Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) recognizes the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) inaugural Safe + Sound Week.
 
OSHA Safe and Sound Week takes place June 12-18, 2017, and encourages organizations to hold events that center around three core elements: Management Leadership, Worker Participation, and Finding and Fixing Hazards. Safe and sound events have been scheduled across the country by a variety of different organizations.
 
Safety and Health programs are essential because they can prevent workplace hazards. Identifying potential sources of injuries or illnesses and establishing procedures to fix them helps ensure the safety and health of workers and improves sustainability in the workplace.
 
It is important to engage workers across all levels of the workplace in order to increase the flow of knowledge and communication across management sectors.
 
“Sound Week represents a nationwide effort to raise awareness and understanding of the value of safety and health programs that include management leadership, encourage worker participation, and employ a systematic approach to finding and fixing hazards in the workplace before someone is injured,” says RCMA Executive Director Matt Coffindaffer. “RCMA and its members value workforce safety and welcome this opportunity to collaborate with OSHA and the other sponsors of Safe + Sound Week.”
 
All participants can promote their commitment by using the hashtag #SafeAndSound on social media. Participants are also encouraged to share photos from Safe + Sound events, certificates of recognition, or their own injury and hazard prevention efforts.
 
For a list of Safe + Sound Week events around the country and to learn more about OSHA’s commitment to a safe workplace and sound business, please visit here.

RCMA Supports Campaign to Prevent Fall Fatalities and Injuries

To increase awareness of construction fatalities caused by falls from elevation, the Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) recognizes and supports the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) awareness campaign to prevent fall fatalities and injuries.
 
Falls from elevation are a leading cause of death in the construction industry, and labor statistics indicate that the number of fatalities and injuries from falls have risen in recent years. Lack of proper fall protection is the most frequently cited OSHA violation.
 
OSHA’s National Safety Stand-Down Campaign takes place May 8 – 12, and will ask employers and workers to voluntarily devote work time to discuss safety hazards, protection, and fall prevention initiatives. Stand-Down events have been scheduled in all 50 states by a host of industry, community, educational, and nonprofit organizations.
 
RCMA recommends that roofing inspections be performed by a roofing professional authorized and capable of making repairs. If homeowners or in-house staff are conducting inspections, they should always first attempt to observe the roof from the ground. Maintenance, repair, and coating applications should be coordinated by a properly trained building owner or by an experienced roof coatings applicator.
 
“OSHA’s Safety Stand-Down highlights the safety risks inherent in roofing where specialists routinely perform high-elevation work,” says RCMA Executive Director Matt Coffindaffer. “We encourage RCMA members to participate in this event by taking a moment to emphasize safety issues and preventative practices, educate others about best practices, and open a dialogue with all shareholders to ensure a safe workplace environment.”
 
Stand-Down participants can use the hashtag #StandDown4Safety on social media to help raise awareness for OSHA’s safety awareness campaign. Participants can also share photos of Stand-Down events, certificates of participation, or highlight their own fall prevention efforts.
 
To learn more about OSHA’s National Safety Stand-Down campaign to prevent falls in construction, please visit the website

RCMA Selects New Executive Director

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) has selected Matt Coffindaffer as its new Executive Director. Matt replaces Jim Kirby, who leaves RCMA to pursue his professional interests in architecture and building science.

“RCMA has a management team supporting its members each and every day to bring a unified voice on issues important to the roof coatings industry,” says Kirby. “It has been an honor serving as Executive Director for RCMA, and I am happy to pass the torch to Matt.”

Coffindaffer is a Certified Association Executive and has several years of experience working in Washington, D.C. in association management. Matt has served as Executive Director of the OpenTravel Alliance and led strategic initiatives for a number of associations including the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE), the National Pest Management Association, and the National Council of Agricultural Employers. He is a 2016 recipient of the Association Forum USAE 40 under 40 and an ASAE NextGen alumni.

“I am looking forward to the opportunity to serve the members of RCMA, our constituencies, and our industry,” says Coffindaffer. “I believe in the power of collaboration and in bringing people of all backgrounds and varying levels of experience and expertise to drive consensus, create new opportunities and value, and otherwise further the mission and vision of RCMA and our industry.”

Coffindaffer completed both his undergraduate degree and M.B.A. from West Virginia University in Morgantown, WV. In his free time, he likes to participate in triathlons and play recreational league soccer.

RCMA, NSF International Create Roof Coating Materials PCR

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) and NSF International have created a product category rule (PCR) for roof coating materials. PCRs enable product environmental information to be more transparent and useful to the marketplace. Products covered in this PCR include fluid-applied and adhered coatings used for roof maintenance or roof repair, or as a component of a roof covering system or roof assembly. 
 
Based on international environmental management guidelines (ISO 14025), a PCR defines how to conduct a life cycle assessment for a particular product group and what to include in the resulting report. A life-cycle assessment measures inputs, outputs and environmental impacts of a product across its lifespan. The environmental product declaration (EPD) is the third-party-verified report that explains the data generated from a life cycle assessment. What is included in the EPD is also defined by the PCR.

The NSF International National Center for Sustainability Standards (NCSS) utilized an open consultative process to develop the PCR with participation from an expert panel of RCMA members, suppliers, regulatory agencies, environmental organizations and end users.  RCMA promotes the benefits of roof coatings and represents manufacturers of asphaltic and solar reflective roof coatings as well as suppliers to the roof coatings industry. 

“This product category rule developed by RCMA and NSF International provides our industry a needed guideline for calculating and reporting the environmental attributes of roof coatings,” says Jim Kirby, executive director of RCMA. “The subsequent life cycle analyses developed by our members using the PCR can provide a basis for improvement to enable reductions in environmental impacts over time. We look forward to the positive impact this will have on the industry and those seeking more sustainable building products.”

“As a manufacturer participating in the PCR development, we support our industry in providing transparent and science-based information to our customers,” says Douglas P. Mazeffa, environmental project manager at Sherwin Williams. “Our company is committed to helping customers make informed, environmentally-based purchasing decisions.”
 
“Industries benefit from NSF International’s standards development process that was used to develop the PCR for roof coating materials,” states Jessica Slomka, manager of the NSF International National Center for Sustainability Standards. “By engaging RCMA members and other stakeholders, we help ensure the environmental impacts in the life cycle of a product are represented. The result is a defined set of rules that enable comparative data to be gathered and reported in a standardized fashion. This is crucial in helping builder’s source products that meet their environmental goals.”

Verified environmental product declarations (EPDs) as defined by this PCR may help building projects qualify for points through the LEED v4 Material and Resource credits and comply with the International Green Construction Code (IgCC).   

RCMA Hosts Third Biennial Conference

The Washington, D.C.-based Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) hosted its third biennial International Roof Coatings Conference (IRCC) at the Sonesta Hotel in Philadelphia, July 18-21, 2016. In partnership with 11 industry organizations, the conference offered educational news and updates to a variety of professionals involved in the roofing and building sciences industries.

 International Roof Coatings Conference attendees volunteered to apply reflective roof coatings to 18 row homes in north Philadelphia.

International Roof Coatings Conference attendees volunteered to apply reflective roof coatings to 18 row homes in north Philadelphia.

This year’s IRCC was attended by more than 170 industry representatives, resulting in more than 40 percent growth in attendance compared to 2014. Speakers delivered presentations about industry developments, emerging technologies, sustainability and economics. Speakers also shared research papers with meeting attendees and participated in dialogues about the future of the roof coatings industry. The IRCC concluded with a joint keynote presentation about industry innovation by Robért Hinojosa, president of Raleigh, N.C.-based RCI Inc., and Paul Bromfield, chief marketing officer of GAF, Parsippany, N.J.

Prior to the conference, RCMA members volunteered in a roof coatings activity with the Energy Coordinating Agency (ECA), Philadelphia. Volunteers worked directly with ECA staff to apply reflective roof coatings on 18 row homes on the 1200 block of West Seltzer Street in north Philadelphia. The application of reflective roof coatings is just one part of ECA’s EnergyFit Philly program, which aims to preserve affordable housing in Philadelphia by repairing and providing deep-energy retrofits to low-income homes in extremely poor condition. RCMA members GAF; Arkema Inc., King of Prussia, Pa.; Acrymax Technologies Inc., Media, Pa.; and Palmer Asphalt Co., Bayonne, N.J., donated roof coat- ing products for use in the project. City Council President Darrell Clarke and Director of the Philadelphia Office of Sustainability Christine Knapp joined the RCMA/ECA event to thank volunteers for their contributions to the success of the EnergyFit Philly program.

During the conference, John Ferraro, RCMA executive director, debuted RCMA’s Emerging Leader Award. The inaugural Emerging Leader Award is presented to an RCMA member who has made strides toward becoming a leader in the roof coatings industry and who serves as a role model for his or her industry peers. Benjamin Borns of Cleveland-based Sherwin-Williams was the award re- cipient. Borns currently serves as RCMA treasurer, is a member of the RCMA board of directors, co-chair of the RCMA Sustainability Task Force and spoke at this year’s IRCC. Following the award presentation, RCMA hosted an emerging leader’s reception, welcoming conference attend- ees under 35 years of age and/or with less than three years’ experience in the roof coatings industry.

John Ferraro (left), Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association executive director, awards Benjamin Borns of Sherwin-Williams the inaugural Emerging Leader Award.

John Ferraro (left), Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association executive director, awards Benjamin Borns of Sherwin-Williams the inaugural Emerging Leader Award.

Following the conclusion of the IRCC, RCMA launched its Summer Membership Meeting program to update attendees about the status of RCMA’s projects and activities. Groups that provided updates included the RCMA Technical Affairs Committee, RCMA Reflective Roof Coating Institute and RCMA Government Affairs Committee. An in-person board of directors meeting immediately followed the presentations.

RCMA will continue to host the IRCC biennially; the next conference will take place in 2018. Learn more about RCMA activities, programs and initiatives.

Choosing the Right Roof Coatings for Substrates Can Extend Roof Service Lives, Cool Temperatures and Save Energy

Roof coatings are a fast-growing market segment in the roofing industry—and it makes good sense why that is the case. Application of a roof coating on a new or existing roof can provide
added durability, extend roof service life, save on energy costs, and avoid the hassle and expense of a full tear-off and replacement.

COATING TYPES

Roof coatings come in many formulations and are appropriate for installation over all roof system types. The first question many have is which coating is appropriate for which substrate?

A reflective coating has been applied to a hybrid asphaltic roof. PHOTO: GAF

A reflective coating has been applied to a hybrid asphaltic roof.
PHOTO: GAF

Coatings are most broadly divided into asphaltic- and polymer-based materials. Asphaltic-based coatings are solvent-based “cut backs” or water-based emulsions. They can be black or aluminized. They have the ability to be used in cold and inclement weather. Aluminized coatings are used when a reflective and ultraviolet-, or UV-, stable asphalt coating is needed.

The most common polymer-based coatings include acrylics, polyurethanes and silicone coatings. Acrylic water-based coatings are ideal for high UV environments where a reflective roof is desired. They can be colored but generally are sold in white, tan and gray. Many specialized versions are made to be compatible with specific substrates. Polyurethane coatings are typically solvent-based and come in two main types, aromatic and aliphatic. Urethanes have good mechanical properties and high abrasion resistance. They are suggested for use in hail-prone regions or where a roof is exposed to heavy foot traffic.

Silicone coatings, like acrylic coatings, perform well in high UV environments where a reflective roof is desired. Often silicone is used in locations where rain is a daily occurrence or if the roof is often wet and experiences excessive amounts of ponded water. In addition, butyl, fluoropolymer, PMMA, polyester, STPE, SEBS and styrene-acrylics can be used to formulate roof coatings.

Coating thickness (dry film thickness) has an effect on performance. In general, thicker coatings will have increased service life and will provide additional durability regardless of coating type. Also very important is the specification written for each project. Every project is different and every specification should be tailored to every project to ensure the correct coating and application is appropriate for the roof and coating type. Coating manufacturers’ specifications should be the basis for every coating project and be coordinated with project specifications.

SUBSTRATES

Asphaltic-based coatings are most commonly used on built-up roof (BUR) and modified bitumen (MB) membranes; they are rarely, if ever, used on single-ply roof membranes. All types of polymer-based coatings are used on BUR, MB, metal and single-ply roofs. There is information to assist with the evaluation and preparation of the substrate in the ASTM standard titled, “Standard Guide for Evaluation and Preparation of Roof Membranes for Coating Application”.

From a material-quality standpoint, it is important to use products that meet or exceed their ASTM material standards, which are listed in the International Building Code and International Residential Code. Meeting the building-code requirements provides the minimum safeguards for materials used for construction.

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RCMA Members Apply Roof Coatings for ECA EnergyFit Program

Twenty-three members of the Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) volunteered to apply reflective cool roof coatings on 18 low-income row homes on the 1200 block of West Seltzer Street in North Philadelphia to support the Energy Coordinating Agency’s (ECA) EnergyFit Philly program.

Under a hot sun and high humidity, volunteers climbed up 32 foot ladders to apply reflective cool roof coatings under the guidance and support of ECA’s staff and contractors. Working on houses on both sides of the street, every roof received the first coating in about three hours.

Cooling down with iced water, volunteers listened to remarks by City Council President, Darrell Clarke – who thanked each volunteer personally – while acknowledging the good work by ECA and noting how energy conservation helps residents save money. The Director of Sustainability, Christine Knapp, drew attention to our prolonged heat wave and focused on the value of cool roof coatings to reduce air conditioning use. Finally, Darlene Pope, “the city’s best block captain,” gave the final remarks of the day. Gracious and thankful, and an advocate for clean energy, Darlene thanked the volunteers from RCMA for helping to make this day possible.

ECA’s EnergyFit Philly program preserves affordable housing by repairing, and providing energy retrofits to low income homes in poor condition. It is an innovative approach to the prevention of homelessness by preserving and stabilizing affordable housing that is currently ineligible for energy conservation programs due to roof leaks and other home repair needs. Applying roof coatings on these homes reduces the cooling load and extends the service life of the roofs.

Roof coatings are designed for protecting and extending the service life of roof assemblies for new construction and more commonly, existing roof coverings. Reflective roof coatings extend the life of the roof by reducing heat transfer into the building, decreasing thermal shock, and helping to mitigate leaks.

Roof coatings reflect visible light as well as infrared and ultraviolet radiation, causing roof surface temperature to drop by up to 55°F and decreasing the amount of heat transferred into a building on hot days. Lower roof temperatures in turn help to reduce cooling costs for buildings with air conditioning units and reduce interior temperatures and relative humidity in buildings with or without cooling units. A building owner can experience an energy savings of up to 15% after using a reflective roof coating, according to information from the U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR Program. When reflective roof coatings are used on a significant portion of a city’s roofs, they will also reduce the urban heat island effect, essentially cooling the entire city.

Several RCMA roof coatings manufacturer and supplier members have donated their products for use in this project, or volunteered their time to apply coatings to a block of low income row homes on West Seltzer Street. The RCMA is partnering with ECA on this project as part of its biennial industry conference, the International Roof Coatings Conference.

Roofing and Waterproofing Committee Presents Award of Merit

ASTM International’s Committee on Roofing and Waterproofing (D08) presents its annual award – the Award of Merit – to Aaron Phillips of TAMKO Building Products Inc. in Joplin, Missouri. The Award of Merit is ASTM’s highest recognition for individual contributions to developing standards.

The committee honors Phillips for outstanding leadership, personal commitment, and participation in many subcommittees and task groups with dedication to developing standards. He has been a member of ASTM since 1991, serving as the D08 committee chairman from 2007 to 2013. He received the Distinguished Leadership Award in 2012 and the Award of Appreciation in both 2008 and 2014.

Phillips is the corporate director of technical systems at TAMKO Building Products Inc. and has been with the company since 2009, having previously served as a research assistant and technical systems specialist.

In addition to ASTM, Phillips is a member of the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, Composite Lumber Manufacturers Association, the Metal Construction Association, the Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association, Canadian Standards Association, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Registration Is Open for the International Roof Coatings Conference

Registration is now open for the Washington, D.C.-based Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association’s (RCMA’s) 2016 International Roof Coatings Conference (IRCC), which will take place at the Sonesta Hotel Philadelphia, July 18-21. Offered in partnership with 11 industry organizations, the conference will be the premiere roof coatings event in 2016 and will offer education and industry updates to a variety of professionals involved in roofing and building sciences.

Before the conference, attendees can participate in a golf outing or volunteer in a roof coatings project with the Energy Coordinating Agency, Philadelphia. These activities will take place concurrently on Monday, July 18. The conference will officially begin with an opening reception on Monday eve-ning and will conclude with a keynote presentation from Raleigh, N.C.-based RCI Inc. and Paul Bromfield of GAF, Parsippany, N.J., on Wednesday afternoon, July 20. In addition, speakers will deliver presentations on a range of timely topics, sharing their research papers with meeting attendees and participating in conversations about the future of the coatings industry.

The RCMA Summer Meeting, open to RCMA members and non-member guests, will follow the conclusion of IRCC programming and will continue through the morning of Thursday, July 21. Highlights of the RCMA portion of the event will include presentations from FM Approvals and the Philadelphia Office of Sustainability, detailed reports on RCMA’s committee activities and a roof coating end-user panel discussion.

RCMA Bestows Award, Elects Board Members

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association, Washington, D.C., hosted more than 100 industry attendees at its 2016 Annual Meeting, Feb. 15-16, in Orlando, Fla.

During the event, the association named Greg Johnson of The Sherwin-Williams Co. the recipient of the 2015 RCMA Martin A. Davis Industry Leadership Award. The award is the highest honor bestowed by RCMA and is presented annually to an individual, selected by his or her fellow RCMA members, who has exemplified outstanding service and made significant contributions to the roof coatings industry.

Johnson has been an active and integral member of RCMA since 2008 and currently serves as chairman of the RCMA Government Affairs Committee. “Very well-deserved honoree,” comments John Ferraro, RCMA executive director. “Greg has faithfully been involved with the RCMA Government Affairs Committee. He is passionate about key advocacy issues and is a tremendous asset to the industry.”

Also during the annual meeting, new officers were elected to the RCMA board of directors for 2016. The following officers were ratified by the membership to serve two-year terms:

  • President: John Stubblefield, Polyglass USA
  • Vice President: Jonathan Dietzel, SWT Group
  • Vice President: Greg Hlavaty, Western Colloid
  • Secretary: Ed Buczek, Henry Co.
  • Treasurer: Benjamin Borns, KST Coatings