RCMA Is Accepting Abstracts for International Roof Coatings Conference

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) is now accepting abstracts for its fourth biennial International Roof Coatings Conference (IRCC) program. The deadline for submission of abstracts is Oct. 31, 2017. 
 
The 2018 IRCC will take place July 23-26, 2018, at the Fairmont Chicago Millennium Park, in Chicago. The conference will feature a host of networking opportunities, educational sessions, and other programming geared toward professionals involved in the roof coatings industry.  
 
“Our last conference was a success, with an over 40 percent growth in attendance,” says Jared Rothstein, RCMA Industry Affairs Manager. “We expect that the 2018 IRCC will provide more opportunity for our industry to join together, discuss issues, consider emerging trends, and enjoy each other’s company.”
 
Possible conference presentation topics include global market developments, green building trends, application practices, energy cost savings evaluations, roof coating formulation advancements, roof systems analysis, and in-situ field research. Roofing industry professionals, building envelope technology experts, material scientists, and those in the design community are encouraged to submit their abstracts for consideration.
 
Those interested in presenting at the 2018 IRCC should visit the IRCC website for more information and to complete the abstract submission form.  A list of conference partnership, sponsorship, and exhibition opportunities is also available on the IRCC website. 

RCMA Selects New Executive Director

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) has selected Matt Coffindaffer as its new Executive Director. Matt replaces Jim Kirby, who leaves RCMA to pursue his professional interests in architecture and building science.

“RCMA has a management team supporting its members each and every day to bring a unified voice on issues important to the roof coatings industry,” says Kirby. “It has been an honor serving as Executive Director for RCMA, and I am happy to pass the torch to Matt.”

Coffindaffer is a Certified Association Executive and has several years of experience working in Washington, D.C. in association management. Matt has served as Executive Director of the OpenTravel Alliance and led strategic initiatives for a number of associations including the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE), the National Pest Management Association, and the National Council of Agricultural Employers. He is a 2016 recipient of the Association Forum USAE 40 under 40 and an ASAE NextGen alumni.

“I am looking forward to the opportunity to serve the members of RCMA, our constituencies, and our industry,” says Coffindaffer. “I believe in the power of collaboration and in bringing people of all backgrounds and varying levels of experience and expertise to drive consensus, create new opportunities and value, and otherwise further the mission and vision of RCMA and our industry.”

Coffindaffer completed both his undergraduate degree and M.B.A. from West Virginia University in Morgantown, WV. In his free time, he likes to participate in triathlons and play recreational league soccer.

Polyglass USA Celebrates 25 Years of Roofing, Waterproofing Materials Production

Polyglass USA Inc. is celebrating 25 years of producing roofing and waterproofing materials for the North American roofing industry. Polyglass will commemorate this milestone with its customers throughout 2017.

Polyglass is a manufacturer of modified bitumen roof membranes, elastomeric roof coatings and underlayments. Founded in the early 1950s by roofing contractors in northern Italy, Polyglass established its first manufacturing plant in the 1960s serving roofing contractors across Europe. The company grew and expanded operations into the U.S. in 1992 with its first location in Fernley, Nev. By 2006, Polyglass had grown to three US facilities with the addition of plants in Pennsylvania and Florida.

In 2008, Polyglass was acquired by Mapei, a global manufacturer of adhesives, sealants and construction materials for the building industry. Since the acquistion, Polyglass has added a manufacturing location in Arizona, with an additional facility in Texas slated to be operational at the end of 2017. The Polyglass manufacturing facilities are ISO 9001:2008 certified and strategically located to serve its customers.

“Celebrating 25 years of successfully developing and producing roofing solutions that has helped transform the roofing industry would not be possible without our committed employees,” says CEO Natalino Zanchetta. “With a focus on quality, Polyglass has developed solutions for use in every climate and we continue to innovate to meet the changing needs of our customers.”

Since developing its first compound formula decades ago, Polyglass has added hundreds of products that extend the roof-life cycle, help manage building energy loads and enhance building aesthetics. With the launch of patented ADESO Technology, Polyglass provided a way to install modified bitumen membranes. Polyglass also developed patented CURE Technology, a thin film technology applied to membranes during the manufacturing process to increase reflectivity, durability, stain and UV resistance, granule retention and energy efficiency.

As part of its commitment to customers, Polyglass offers continuing education through Polyschool, a two-day training program that teaches best practices in the installation of Polyglass’ commercial and residential products. Polyglass has also developed a customer loyalty program with its Q Rewards program – rewarding its customers for their Polyglass product purchases.

IPS Corp. Acquires Roof Coatings Company, Metacrylics

IPS Corp., a manufacturer of building and specialty adhesive products, has acquired the Metacrylics roof coatings company, based in Gilroy, Calif. This acquisition is in support of the IPS growth strategy within the roofing industry. IPS Roofing Products is known for roof flashing products for vent pipes, which are manufactured in Tennessee and sold nationally through both wholesale roofing distribution and building products retailers.

Gary Rosenfield, vice president and general manager of the IPS Roofing Products division, comments, “We are excited to enter the cool roof coatings market with the products and service proposition provided by Metacrylics. With the resources of IPS Corp. in support of this business, we plan to build on the previous success and reputation of Metacrylics. I am looking forward to working with the Metacrylics team to help them continue in that effort.”

Mark Anthenien, president and CEO of Metacrylics, says, “We are delighted to be associated with the IPS organization. With their support, we will be able to expand our resources and reach more customers with the high level of service and support that has become the foundation of our success.”

T. Tracy Bilbrough, chairman and CEO of IPS Corp., adds, “The addition of Metacrylics to our portfolio of brands, product lines, and operating facilities is a step forward in our journey of building a platform in industrial and construction related specialty products. We are thrilled to welcome the team and products of Metacrylics to the IPS family.”

Metacrylics is a manufacturer of cool roof coatings, and offers both acrylic and silicone varieties of products. It has a long history of successful installations in many regions of the country. Most recently, Metacrylics’ Extreme Performance acrylic product has been recognized in the commercial roofing market due to its adhesion, ease of installation, solar reflectivity rating, and ability to resist debris over time.

Roof Coating Reduces Energy and Maintenance Costs

Crystal roof coating helps reduce energy costs.

Crystal roof coating helps reduce energy costs.

Using white colored roofs is a way to help reduce heat gain into a building or home in the southern climates where it stays hot most of the time. Just as wearing white or light colored clothes can help you stay cooler on a sunny day, a white roof can help keep a building cooler and lower the load on the air conditioning unit, reducing cooling costs.

Using the cool roof calculator on Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s website, it shows that if you live in Miami, Florida a white “cool” roof can save you approximately 0.185 USD per square foot per year as compared to a black roof. That’s roughly $647.50 per year for a 3500-square-foot home or $9,250 per year for a 50,000-square-foot office building or warehouse.

But what happens when a white roof turns grey?

When doing energy saving calculations, one of the overlooked errors is not factoring in the loss of insulating performance when white roofs get dirty or moldy. When that happens, the “cool roof” impact is less effective because the roof has gone from a reflective white to a grey or green.

For concrete roof tiles, especially, another factor that impacts energy efficiency is moisture. When a roof is wet, it conducts more heat than when it’s dry, making it less energy efficient.  

That’s why Crystal clear insulating and mold resistant roof coating benefits all types of roofs, including white roofs. It not only has its own insulating benefit (in all seasons and climates), it also helps the roof stay clean and resists the growth of mold. Another benefit it provides is a moisture resistant surface, so rain beads up and rolls off (taking dirt along with it) rather than soaking in.

If you tally the stay clean/maintenance benefits (not the energy saving ones), you can estimate saving approximately 25 cents per square feet to have a roof power washed. For a 5,000-square-foot roof that is $1250 per washing, which is usually done every one to two years by most. Product for that same amount of roof, would be approximately $3,000, so with incorporating maintenance savings, payback would be approximately 2.4 years, and your total maintenance savings over the 10-year warranty period would be approximately $12,500 if you previously had to clean the roof each year.

A School Used Crystal Roof Coating to Keep their White Roof Clean & Efficient

A Florida school had a costly issue, their white metal roof grew mold and collected dirt, meaning not only constant maintenance costs to clean it, but also a loss of energy efficiency. They looked to Crystal roof coating to solve the issue and ran a 60-day trial to see how it would help them.

Crystal roof coating applied to a section of the school roof remained clean.

Crystal roof coating applied to a section of the school roof remained clean.

The roof was cleaned and a section of the roof was painted with a coat of white paint and then over-coated with two coats of Crystal clear insulating and mold and UV resistant roof coating.

The photo above was taken 60-days after application. The spots where Crystal was applied stayed clean and white, while the unprotected areas became dingy and less energy efficient once again.

Additionally, the coating provided thermal insulation to lower cooling costs, even when the sun wasn’t shining.

Contact INI Worldwide for a quote for either product only or product and application. 

RCMA Hosts Third Biennial Conference

The Washington, D.C.-based Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) hosted its third biennial International Roof Coatings Conference (IRCC) at the Sonesta Hotel in Philadelphia, July 18-21, 2016. In partnership with 11 industry organizations, the conference offered educational news and updates to a variety of professionals involved in the roofing and building sciences industries.

 International Roof Coatings Conference attendees volunteered to apply reflective roof coatings to 18 row homes in north Philadelphia.

International Roof Coatings Conference attendees volunteered to apply reflective roof coatings to 18 row homes in north Philadelphia.

This year’s IRCC was attended by more than 170 industry representatives, resulting in more than 40 percent growth in attendance compared to 2014. Speakers delivered presentations about industry developments, emerging technologies, sustainability and economics. Speakers also shared research papers with meeting attendees and participated in dialogues about the future of the roof coatings industry. The IRCC concluded with a joint keynote presentation about industry innovation by Robért Hinojosa, president of Raleigh, N.C.-based RCI Inc., and Paul Bromfield, chief marketing officer of GAF, Parsippany, N.J.

Prior to the conference, RCMA members volunteered in a roof coatings activity with the Energy Coordinating Agency (ECA), Philadelphia. Volunteers worked directly with ECA staff to apply reflective roof coatings on 18 row homes on the 1200 block of West Seltzer Street in north Philadelphia. The application of reflective roof coatings is just one part of ECA’s EnergyFit Philly program, which aims to preserve affordable housing in Philadelphia by repairing and providing deep-energy retrofits to low-income homes in extremely poor condition. RCMA members GAF; Arkema Inc., King of Prussia, Pa.; Acrymax Technologies Inc., Media, Pa.; and Palmer Asphalt Co., Bayonne, N.J., donated roof coat- ing products for use in the project. City Council President Darrell Clarke and Director of the Philadelphia Office of Sustainability Christine Knapp joined the RCMA/ECA event to thank volunteers for their contributions to the success of the EnergyFit Philly program.

During the conference, John Ferraro, RCMA executive director, debuted RCMA’s Emerging Leader Award. The inaugural Emerging Leader Award is presented to an RCMA member who has made strides toward becoming a leader in the roof coatings industry and who serves as a role model for his or her industry peers. Benjamin Borns of Cleveland-based Sherwin-Williams was the award re- cipient. Borns currently serves as RCMA treasurer, is a member of the RCMA board of directors, co-chair of the RCMA Sustainability Task Force and spoke at this year’s IRCC. Following the award presentation, RCMA hosted an emerging leader’s reception, welcoming conference attend- ees under 35 years of age and/or with less than three years’ experience in the roof coatings industry.

John Ferraro (left), Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association executive director, awards Benjamin Borns of Sherwin-Williams the inaugural Emerging Leader Award.

John Ferraro (left), Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association executive director, awards Benjamin Borns of Sherwin-Williams the inaugural Emerging Leader Award.

Following the conclusion of the IRCC, RCMA launched its Summer Membership Meeting program to update attendees about the status of RCMA’s projects and activities. Groups that provided updates included the RCMA Technical Affairs Committee, RCMA Reflective Roof Coating Institute and RCMA Government Affairs Committee. An in-person board of directors meeting immediately followed the presentations.

RCMA will continue to host the IRCC biennially; the next conference will take place in 2018. Learn more about RCMA activities, programs and initiatives.

Choosing the Right Roof Coatings for Substrates Can Extend Roof Service Lives, Cool Temperatures and Save Energy

Roof coatings are a fast-growing market segment in the roofing industry—and it makes good sense why that is the case. Application of a roof coating on a new or existing roof can provide
added durability, extend roof service life, save on energy costs, and avoid the hassle and expense of a full tear-off and replacement.

COATING TYPES

Roof coatings come in many formulations and are appropriate for installation over all roof system types. The first question many have is which coating is appropriate for which substrate?

A reflective coating has been applied to a hybrid asphaltic roof. PHOTO: GAF

A reflective coating has been applied to a hybrid asphaltic roof.
PHOTO: GAF

Coatings are most broadly divided into asphaltic- and polymer-based materials. Asphaltic-based coatings are solvent-based “cut backs” or water-based emulsions. They can be black or aluminized. They have the ability to be used in cold and inclement weather. Aluminized coatings are used when a reflective and ultraviolet-, or UV-, stable asphalt coating is needed.

The most common polymer-based coatings include acrylics, polyurethanes and silicone coatings. Acrylic water-based coatings are ideal for high UV environments where a reflective roof is desired. They can be colored but generally are sold in white, tan and gray. Many specialized versions are made to be compatible with specific substrates. Polyurethane coatings are typically solvent-based and come in two main types, aromatic and aliphatic. Urethanes have good mechanical properties and high abrasion resistance. They are suggested for use in hail-prone regions or where a roof is exposed to heavy foot traffic.

Silicone coatings, like acrylic coatings, perform well in high UV environments where a reflective roof is desired. Often silicone is used in locations where rain is a daily occurrence or if the roof is often wet and experiences excessive amounts of ponded water. In addition, butyl, fluoropolymer, PMMA, polyester, STPE, SEBS and styrene-acrylics can be used to formulate roof coatings.

Coating thickness (dry film thickness) has an effect on performance. In general, thicker coatings will have increased service life and will provide additional durability regardless of coating type. Also very important is the specification written for each project. Every project is different and every specification should be tailored to every project to ensure the correct coating and application is appropriate for the roof and coating type. Coating manufacturers’ specifications should be the basis for every coating project and be coordinated with project specifications.

SUBSTRATES

Asphaltic-based coatings are most commonly used on built-up roof (BUR) and modified bitumen (MB) membranes; they are rarely, if ever, used on single-ply roof membranes. All types of polymer-based coatings are used on BUR, MB, metal and single-ply roofs. There is information to assist with the evaluation and preparation of the substrate in the ASTM standard titled, “Standard Guide for Evaluation and Preparation of Roof Membranes for Coating Application”.

From a material-quality standpoint, it is important to use products that meet or exceed their ASTM material standards, which are listed in the International Building Code and International Residential Code. Meeting the building-code requirements provides the minimum safeguards for materials used for construction.

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RCMA Members Apply Roof Coatings for ECA EnergyFit Program

Twenty-three members of the Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) volunteered to apply reflective cool roof coatings on 18 low-income row homes on the 1200 block of West Seltzer Street in North Philadelphia to support the Energy Coordinating Agency’s (ECA) EnergyFit Philly program.

Under a hot sun and high humidity, volunteers climbed up 32 foot ladders to apply reflective cool roof coatings under the guidance and support of ECA’s staff and contractors. Working on houses on both sides of the street, every roof received the first coating in about three hours.

Cooling down with iced water, volunteers listened to remarks by City Council President, Darrell Clarke – who thanked each volunteer personally – while acknowledging the good work by ECA and noting how energy conservation helps residents save money. The Director of Sustainability, Christine Knapp, drew attention to our prolonged heat wave and focused on the value of cool roof coatings to reduce air conditioning use. Finally, Darlene Pope, “the city’s best block captain,” gave the final remarks of the day. Gracious and thankful, and an advocate for clean energy, Darlene thanked the volunteers from RCMA for helping to make this day possible.

ECA’s EnergyFit Philly program preserves affordable housing by repairing, and providing energy retrofits to low income homes in poor condition. It is an innovative approach to the prevention of homelessness by preserving and stabilizing affordable housing that is currently ineligible for energy conservation programs due to roof leaks and other home repair needs. Applying roof coatings on these homes reduces the cooling load and extends the service life of the roofs.

Roof coatings are designed for protecting and extending the service life of roof assemblies for new construction and more commonly, existing roof coverings. Reflective roof coatings extend the life of the roof by reducing heat transfer into the building, decreasing thermal shock, and helping to mitigate leaks.

Roof coatings reflect visible light as well as infrared and ultraviolet radiation, causing roof surface temperature to drop by up to 55°F and decreasing the amount of heat transferred into a building on hot days. Lower roof temperatures in turn help to reduce cooling costs for buildings with air conditioning units and reduce interior temperatures and relative humidity in buildings with or without cooling units. A building owner can experience an energy savings of up to 15% after using a reflective roof coating, according to information from the U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR Program. When reflective roof coatings are used on a significant portion of a city’s roofs, they will also reduce the urban heat island effect, essentially cooling the entire city.

Several RCMA roof coatings manufacturer and supplier members have donated their products for use in this project, or volunteered their time to apply coatings to a block of low income row homes on West Seltzer Street. The RCMA is partnering with ECA on this project as part of its biennial industry conference, the International Roof Coatings Conference.

EPDM Coatings Announces Caribbean Territorial Sales Agent for Liquid Rubber

EPDM Coatings, distributor of liquid EPDM rubber for North and South America, is pleased to announce that it has approved Innovative Building Systems in Nassau Bahamas (IBS) as the territorial sales agent for the Caribbean. Over the past year through their initial marketing efforts; it was apparent that IBS is able to increase product sales and promote the product in the surrounding countries. Greg Kazmierczak, vice president of commercial sales for EPDM Coatings identified an opportunity. During the past years Mr. Kazmierczak stated his sales staff needed to turn down business due to the logistics of sending product through Miami and having customers in Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic and other countries wait several weeks for product to arrive. They have been looking for a strategic partner and now with the ability of IBS to stock inventory the delivery times are significantly decreased.

IBS President Guilden Gilbert states that he is committed to increasing the sales effort and invest in promotion and advertising throughout the region. In the initial projects where the Liquid EPDM was applied Mr. Gilbert stated there was an opportunity in this area of the world where other coatings would not withstand the saltwater environments. He further added there are benefits of the Liquid EPDM over standard elastomerics or acrylics and silicones. The Liquid EPDM surpassed our expectations as well as the expectations of our customers. There is nothing like it on the market and we have hopes that it will be the standard for many of the roofs throughout the Caribbean. We have made a financial commitment and have gone through the manufacturer’s certification program.

Liquid Rubber is the only Liquid EPDM Rubber in the world. Now with over a 25 year history of success it has become the choice of thousands of customers worldwide. This one coat application extends your existing roof another 18-20 years. Its success is in the chemical cross-linking that occurs allowing the Liquid EPDM to chemically fuse itself to the roofing substrate.

Registration Is Open for the International Roof Coatings Conference

Registration is now open for the Washington, D.C.-based Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association’s (RCMA’s) 2016 International Roof Coatings Conference (IRCC), which will take place at the Sonesta Hotel Philadelphia, July 18-21. Offered in partnership with 11 industry organizations, the conference will be the premiere roof coatings event in 2016 and will offer education and industry updates to a variety of professionals involved in roofing and building sciences.

Before the conference, attendees can participate in a golf outing or volunteer in a roof coatings project with the Energy Coordinating Agency, Philadelphia. These activities will take place concurrently on Monday, July 18. The conference will officially begin with an opening reception on Monday eve-ning and will conclude with a keynote presentation from Raleigh, N.C.-based RCI Inc. and Paul Bromfield of GAF, Parsippany, N.J., on Wednesday afternoon, July 20. In addition, speakers will deliver presentations on a range of timely topics, sharing their research papers with meeting attendees and participating in conversations about the future of the coatings industry.

The RCMA Summer Meeting, open to RCMA members and non-member guests, will follow the conclusion of IRCC programming and will continue through the morning of Thursday, July 21. Highlights of the RCMA portion of the event will include presentations from FM Approvals and the Philadelphia Office of Sustainability, detailed reports on RCMA’s committee activities and a roof coating end-user panel discussion.