McElroy Metal Publishes White Paper about Hangar Re-cover

McElroy Metal has put together a white paper about a successful hangar re-cover for Southwest Airlines. McElroy Metal headed the team that developed, engineered, manufactured and installed the solution for the roof, which was damaged by 30 years of tropical storms, including Hurricane Charley in 2004. The 238T Symmetrical Standing Seam roofing system from McElroy Metal was installed on sub-purlins from Roof Hugger. The 238T met the wind-uplift requirements, and installation without a tear-off offered the best chance for success with minimal interruption to the daily operation. Download the white paper.

Roof Hugger Celebrates 25th Anniversary

In 1991, two developer/contactors and longtime friends, Red McConnohie and Dale Nelson, began a part-time business to manufacture and distribute structurally sound sub-purlins for installing a new metal roof directly over an existing metal roof. The idea came about because McConnohie owned a lease building that needed its roof to be replaced. After a few design sketches using a factory-notch concept with some ingenuity, the original Hugger sub-purlin came alive. McConnohie got his building reroofed and proposed to Nelson that they start a business together selling this innovative new product. So, they set off on a journey, which has lasted 25 years, and now has covered more than 70 million square feet of existing roofs nationally and abroad. The company is the brand Roof Hugger Inc.

The trek was not always that easy because the product is designed to fit over and around the major ribs of the existing panels. Have you ever thought about how many different metal roof profiles are out there? Hundreds, if not thousands. You have ribbed panels in a multitude of spacing and heights from 6 to 13 inches, there are corrugated panels with corrugations spaced from 2.25 to 4 inches, and of course, there are standing seams. These also widely varied because of the vertical and trapezoidal seam configurations, rib-to-rib spacing and heights and with or without standoff clips. Today, Roof Hugger has built a library full of manufacturer literature, both from the old days and the more recent. They refer to this library countless times during a given year but even to this day, they are given a previously unknown panel from a contractor or building owner needing to reroof an existing metal building.

Not only do the profiles and variations of existing metal roofs make this niche roof replacement market challenging at times, but because of the new stringent code requirements, you have panel testing to contend with, as well. Every manufacturer today, producing metal roofing, has and will continue to have their systems tested for performance. The most utilized test standard is known in metal construction as the “Standard Test Method for Structural Performance of Sheet Metal Roof and Siding Systems by Uniform Static Air Pressure Difference” or ASTM E-1592. Without it, it is extremely difficult to engineer roofing products to meet specified building code requirements for given wind speeds. It is not widely understood but each metal roof’s testing can and does vary from its counterparts although they frequently can look almost identical. This is due to seam design, clip design, metal thickness, design specifications and manufacturing limitations. Because of this, Roof Hugger began testing in 1996 and now has numerous metal roofs that have been tested over their sub-purlin systems. They have an (FM) Factory Mutual approval, as well as several (FL#) Florida Product Approved assemblies.

As Roof Hugger celebrates its 25th year, the Hugger team located outside Tampa, Fla., is excited to carry the “Hugger” brands on into the future. McConnohie passed in 2013 at the age of 87, and Roof Hugger is a big part of Red’s legacy, but Dale and Jan Nelson, now owners of Roof Hugger, continue to work relentlessly to make the Hugger stable of products better than any other metal-over-metal retrofit roof system available. Jan Nelson recently commented that “they are so fortunate to have met and grown to know the fabulous people in the metal construction industry via trade shows and organizational meetings. She went on to say, “We have gained an extended family that is surely the best gift of this journey and it puts a smile on my face daily.” Dale Nelson said, “I can’t believe it’s been 25 years. It’s been one heck of an enjoyable ride.” Dale Nelson was recently elected chairman of the Metal Construction Association (MCA), which he is no stranger to this kind of work. He has committed much of his life to volunteer work in both his private life, as well as in business activities.

Roof Hugger now has four production locations in Florida, Indiana, Texas and Washington. Three of their sub-purlin profiles can ship within two to three days and others are made-to-order to ship within 10 to 15 days. Roof Hugger is specified by numerous levels of local, state and federal government agencies, especially the U.S. Military. A recent look at their shipments, found that more than 3 million square feet have been installed at more than 70 domestic military facilities. They provide quotes in hours and a live voice always answers the phone. Prior to Red’s passing, if you were lucky he would answer the phone with a loud “ROOF HUGGER – McCONNOHIE”, and when you call today you will still get an equally enthusiastic greeting from the Roof Hugger crew of Jan, Bill, DJ or Dale.

MCA Presents Awards to Three Outstanding Achievers in the Metal Construction Industry

The Metal Construction Association (MCA) presented awards to three outstanding achievers in the metal construction industry at its winter meeting held in St. Pete Beach, Fla.

Mark James of Roof Hugger Inc. and Randy Allen from Triangle Fastener Corp. were honored with MCA’s Patrick R. Bush Volunteer Service Award, and Ken Buchinger of NCI Building Systems was honored with MCA’s Larry A. Swaney Award.

With 38 years in the metal construction industry, Allen was acknowledged for championing the creation of the MCA Accessories Council, which he is now serving as chair. He was also recognized for his involvement in numerous other MCA committees, councils and initiatives including assisting with the demo area at METALCON, helping to facilitate the Metal Roofing Championship Games, and coordinating MCA’s golf outings.

Credited with completing more than 30 million square feet of retrofit roof projects in his career, Mark James was appreciated for his work in planning, constructing and operating the MCA demo area at METALCON. He was also recognized for being the primary individual responsible for the Metal Roofing Championship Games for the past two years, as well as actively volunteering on the council level.

With more than 40 years in the metal construction industry, Ken Buchinger was honored for serving on the MCA Board from 2006-14, as well as his contributions in technical research for the association. Buchinger’s work led to many key initiatives that benefited the metal construction industry, including MCA’s Metal Roof Service Life Project and its Spray Foam Research Project. He has been an ambassador for education and training and a primary contributor to MCA’s Roofing Installation Manual.

Roof Hugger Hosts Webinar for Metal-over-metal Retrofit Reroofing

Retrofit and reroofing accounts for about 80 percent of all roofing construction projects in the U.S. According to the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA), it is estimated that there are currently more than 25 billion square feet of metal roofs in the U.S. that are from 25 to 45 years old, most of them needing replacement.

Join New Tech Machinery and Roof Hugger in a webinar and learn key facts needed to be successful in this market.

Roof Hugger Inc. has been in the retrofit roofing market since 1991. Roof Hugger will be hosting a webinar focusing on metal-over-metal retrofit reroofing and sharing expertise. Questions will be answered during the presentation.

The webinar will be held on Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. EDT. Click here to sign up for the webinar.

Roof Hugger Updates Library of Literature and Technical Tools

Roof Hugger Inc. of Lutz, Fla., has updated its library of literature and technical tools. Included are Roof Hugger’s 12-page “Proven Solutions for Re-Roofing Metal Roofs” brochure; its 108-page “Design and Installation Solutions” manual; and a new CD-ROM that includes an animated installation video, editable performance specifications, ASTM testing results, 65 AutoCAD installation details, various PowerPoint presentations and much more.

All three are now available to anyone interested by contacting Roof Hugger at (800) 771-1711 or by email. The brochure and manual, as well as much of the CD-ROM contents, are also available for download on the Roof Hugger website.

From Screw-down to Standing-seam Metal Roofing

Time to reroof an old screw-down metal roof? Are you thinking about upgrading to a new standing-seam roof? Great idea! Today’s new standing-seam roofs are truly state-of-the-art; available in many profiles and finishes; and, more importantly, address many of the issues encountered in older generation screw-down metal roofs.

Caulk, roof coating and tar patches were used to cover leaking fasteners and panel end laps.

Caulk, roof coating and tar patches were used to cover leaking fasteners and panel end laps.

The screw-down metal roof and wall panel has been the backbone of the metal building industry since its inception and still represents a significant part of the total market. Screw-down panels are lightweight, durable, inexpensive and strong enough to span up to 5 feet between structural supports. Screw-down roofs and walls also have a wonderful physical property: The panels can and frequently are used as “diaphragm bracing,” securely holding the building’s roof purlins and wall girts in position, adding rigidity to the structure in much the same way drywall strengthens stud walls. This is a huge material—and labor—cost saver!

The early systems were not without problems, however; much of the technology we take for granted today did not exist in the early years of pre-engineered buildings. Many roofs during the late ’60s thru early ’80s were installed using 10-year life fasteners to secure a 30-plus-year life roof.

The fastener issue seems crazy today given the numerous inexpensive, long-life, weathertight, self-drilling screws available. Back when I started in the metal building industry, you could have the newly developed “self-drilling” cadmium fasteners or “self-tapping” stainless. Self-tapping meant you had to pre-drill a hole in the panel and purlin to install it—a much slower and more expensive process. Most of us used the less expensive but (unknown to us at the time) fairly short-life cadmium-coated fasteners and often never provided the option of a stainless upgrade to our customers.

Another shortcoming with screw-down roof panels is that, generally speaking, screw-down panels on metal buildings should be a maximum length of about 80 feet. Longer roof-panel runs frequently suffered rips or slots in the metal caused by expansion and contraction. Metal panels expand and contract at a rate of about 1 inch per 100 feet of panel run. This is normally absorbed by the back and forth rolling of the roof purlin and some panel bowing, but after 80 feet or so they can no longer absorb the movement resulting in trauma to the panels and trim. I have frequently seen this 80-foot limit exceeded.

a rusted fastener has caused the surrounding metal to corrode and fail.

A rusted fastener has caused the surrounding
metal to corrode and fail.

Standing-seam panels eliminate both of these shortcomings. The panels are attached to “sliding clips”. These clips are screwed to the purlins and seamed into the side laps of the panels securing them and thus the panels have very few, if any, exposed fasteners. The clips maintain a solid connection with the structure of the building while still allowing the panels, which can be 150 feet or longer, to move with expansion and contraction forces without damage.

This is great news for the building owner: You’re providing a more watertight roof, few if any penetrations, and expansion and contraction ability. It does come with a catch, however; standing-seam panels, because they move, do not provide diaphragm strength. The building’s roof purlins must have significantly more bridging and bracing to keep them in their correct and upright position. This is automatically taken care of in new building design but when it comes time to reroof an older building, removing the existing screw-down roof could remove the diaphragm bracing it once provided and make the building structurally unsound. Yes, that’s bad!

PHOTOS: ROOF HUGGER INC.

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Roof Hugger Releases Metal-over-metal Retrofit Reroofing Design and Installation Manual

Roof Hugger Inc. announces its 2014 Version 3.04 Design & Installation Solutions manual for Metal-over-Metal retrofit reroofing systems.

The 108-page manual provides design professionals and contractors with technical information pertaining to retrofit sub-framing systems for installing a new metal roof over an existing metal roof, without removal. Included in its content is information on utilizing the space between the old roof and bottom side of the new metal roof for installing insulation, dynamic ventilation and/or solar thermal hot air/water systems. Also included are 65 construction details that can be downloaded from Roof Hugger’s website in ACAD and PDF formats.

If interested in receiving a printed copy of the manual, send an email request to sales@roofhugger.com or fax (877) 202-2254.

Metal Construction Association Honors Members with Volunteer Service Awards

The Metal Construction Association (MCA) honored two of its members—Randy Ridenour and Dale Nelson—with prestigious volunteer service awards, the Larry A. Swaney Award and the Patrick R. Bush Volunteer Service Award, respectively, at its recent Annual Meeting.

The Larry A. Swaney Award honors one of MCA founders and its first president who was committed to fostering growth and enhancing the betterment of metal construction. “This year we present this award to someone who has brought significant business acumen to the MCA board and has been involved in MCA’s long-term success in growing the markets we serve and making sure MCA has always been fiscally responsible: Randy Ridenour of Atlas Bolt & Screw,” said MCA Chair Karl Hielscher, during the presentation on Jan. 27.

Since 2003, this award has been presented to a person who has worked unselfishly for the success of the association and the betterment of the metal construction industry. Past Swaney Award recipients include:

  • 2013 Ted S. Miller
    2012 Sid Peterson
    2011 Dick Bus
    2010 Patrick R. Bush
    2008 Delbert F. Boring
    2006 Harold Schroth
    2005 Bill Croucher
    2004 Sam W. Milnark
    2003 John Mattingly

Colleagues praised Ridenour for serving as a longtime active member of the MCA board of directors and providing ongoing support for all MCA activities throughout the years. He was noted for being a proponent of continuous recruitment of more professionals involved in the association. One colleague said, “His judgment and recommendations where always taken into consideration and he made a difference on important issues.”

The Patrick R. Bush Service Award was established to honor Pat Bush, a longtime MCA board member and past Larry A. Swaney Award winner who passed away suddenly in 2010. The award recognizes one individual from a member company who has recently made significant volunteer contributions to the Metal Construction Association. “This year we honor a volunteer who has been involved with the METALCON conference for many years and was the longtime chair of the METALCON Liaison Committee for MCA: Dale Nelson of Roof Hugger Inc.,” said MCA Chair Hielscher.

Past Bush Award recipients include:

  • 2012 Robert Anderson
    2011 Jim Bush

Colleagues commended Nelson for his willingness to volunteer for the METALCON Demo area. “He always puts the association position ahead of personal and organizational gains,” said one nominator.”Dale has excellent organizational skills and is always looking for ways to enhance the METALCON brand among a broader audience.”

The awards presentation took place during the Awards Dinner at the MCA 2014 Annual Meeting in Clearwater, Fla. The meeting was attended by more than 125 current members, interested parties and guests. In addition to the presentation of service awards, the meeting focused on elections of officers and board of directors; vital industry discussions within Council and Committee agendas, especially technical and codes and standards initiatives and market development activities; a state of the association report; and various networking opportunities.

MCA’s next national meeting is the 2014 Semi-Annual Meeting, scheduled for June 23-25, 2014, at the Westin O’Hare in Rosemont, Ill.

MBCI Partners with Roof Hugger to Offer Metal-over-metal Retrofit Roofing

MBCI is now offering Roof Hugger retrofit systems. Roof Hugger products can be installed over most existing metal roofs, including trapezoidal and vertical standing-seam roofs, as well as existing R panel roofs. Roof Hugger systems provide many benefits and advantages to building owners, design professionals and roofing contractors.

Metal-over-metal retrofit roofing is the installation of a new, long-life metal roof over an existing metal roof in a way that is structurally correct, non-disruptive and cost effective. The Roof Hugger systems also add strength, are environmentally friendly and help conserve energy. In addition to fitting over most any existing roof, the Roof Hugger system can support a wide variety of new metal roof systems. The cavity created between the old and new roofs can be vented or the heated air can be used to preheat the make-up air for the HVAC system. This cavity can also be filled with either fiberglass or rigid insulation to increase the roof R-value. Additionally, a solar water heating system can be installed in the cavity.

MBCI’s family of companies manufacture metal roof and wall systems and roll-up doors. Solutions include single skin and insulated metal panels, standing seam roof systems, retrofit roofing systems, roll-up doors and photovoltaic systems. MBCI has 33 facilities located strategically throughout the U.S., including retail outlets in select cities, serving the commercial, industrial, architectural, agricultural, institutional, residential and self-storage market.

Project Profiles: Government

Richland County Landfill Columbia, S.C.

Petersen Aluminum roofing

Team

Roofing contractor: Aqua Seal Manufacturing and Roofing Inc., West Columbia, S.C.
Metal roof, soffit and wall manufacturer: Petersen Aluminum Corp., Elk Grove Village, Ill.

Roof Materials

The following materials were used on the roof:

  • 6,903 square feet of 24-gauge Tite-Loc in the Cityscape color
  • 1,216 square feet of 24-gauge HWP 16-inch Panel in the Cityscape color
  • 1,673 square feet of 0.032 PAC-850 Full Vent in the Cityscape color

Roof Report

Petersen Aluminum roofing
This new construction project began in early October 2012 and was completed in April 2013. Petersen Aluminum provided a complete metal system: roof, soffit and wall.

PHOTOS: Petersen Aluminum Corp.

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