Project Profiles: Hospitality & Entertainment

B.O.B., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Roof Materials

The double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

The double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

The B.O.B.’s 900-square-foot Sky Patio was completed in August 2015 when its signature green wall was installed. The distinctive double-sided green wall surrounds guests with nature and provides fresh ingredients for the food they enjoy.

“Our living wall on the Sky Patio is a vivid symbol of our commitment to sustainability and support of the local environments where our restaurants are located,” says Alice Jasper, director of sustainability, the Gilmore Collection. “It greens up the exterior and interior of the rooftop patio, contributing to the beautification of downtown, making the patio more inviting from the street below and enhancing the dining experience of our guests.”

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet. Three exterior sections (48 inches in height) are attached to the outside of the fencing that surrounds the patio. Facing out to the street, these sections frame the Sky Patio on three sides with flowering annuals and perennials. There are five interior sections (45 1/2 inches in height), three on the inside of the perimeter fence, two on the back wall of the building. In addition to flowers, the interior sections include vegetables and herbs used in the kitchen.

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet.

The two-sided green wall totals 608 square feet.

“Local sourcing of ingredients is one of our main sustainable hospitality practices,” says Barbie Smith, the Gilmore Collection’s gardener. “With the green wall at the B.O.B., we grow ingredients right near the tables where our guests dine. You cannot get more local than that.”

“What chef wouldn’t want a garden with fresh herbs and produce right in their restaurant? A green wall makes it practical,” adds Mick Rickerd, chef at Bobarino’s. “We utilize the herbs in all our everyday dishes and the vegetables, like Swiss chard and rainbow carrots, in daily features. Our mixology team incorporates fresh basil, mint, lemongrass and thyme into special summer cocktails.”

Green Wall Manufacturer: LiveWall

Roof Report

The B.O.B. is the Gilmore Collection’s most ambitious project, and it exemplifies the company’s commitment to sustainability. The B.O.B. is an acronym for Big Old Building; the 70,000-square-foot, 4-story, red brick building was constructed in 1903 as a grocery warehouse. It stood vacant for decades before the Gilmore Collection saved it from demolition and began its transformation into a landmark hospitality destination in downtown Grand Rapids. The B.O.B. offers multiple venues, including bars, restaurants, comedy and nightclubs, as well as the rooftop Sky Patio, which is accessible through Bobarino’s restaurant on the second floor.

Photos: LiveWall

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Roofing Adhesive Features One-Step Application Process

Helix Low-Rise Adhesive is ready to use from the container, no mixing required.

Helix Low-Rise Adhesive is ready to use from the container, no mixing required.

With a one-step application process, Helix Low-Rise Adhesive from Mule-Hide Products Co. provides adhesion of approved roof insulations, thermal barriers, cover boards and fleece-backed single-ply membranes to a variety of roofing substrates.
 
The polyurethane foam is applied in a single step. Both parts of the adhesive are ready to use from the container – no mixing required – and are applied simultaneously in a 1:1 ratio through a static mix tip. It is applied in continuous ribbons or beads spaced 4, 6 or 12 inches apart, depending on the project and code requirements. There is no overspray, and it cures in minutes.
 
Helix Low-Rise Adhesive contains no volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) or hydro chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs). 
 
It does not require mechanical fasteners, maintaining a puncture-free vapor retarder, preventing thermal bridging and protecting the structural integrity of the roof deck.
 
The bond created by Helix Low-Rise Adhesive provides wind uplift resistance, allowing it to be used on buildings in higher wind zones. In addition, it provides hail resistance when used as an adhesive for fleece-backed membranes.
 
Helix Low-Rise Adhesive comes in cartridge twin-pack tubes or two-tank sets. Both include one container of each of the adhesive’s two components – Part A and Part B. Cartridge twin-packs cover approximately 200-600 square feet of roof and tank sets cover approximately 1,000-3,000 square feet of roof, depending on bead spacing.
 
The cartridges fit most dispensing guns currently available on the market. Tank sets come with a Helix Gun Assembly (25-foot dual-hose with attached spray gun), petroleum packet, wrench, and 10 Tank Static Mix Tips. Contractors need not purchase specialty pumps or spray rigs. No external power source is required to run application equipment.

Asphalt Roofing Provides Comprehensive Weather Protection for a Luxury Condominium

Working with the unique variables of a region and its climate poses a significant challenge to roofing contractors. Installing a roof system that looks beautiful and can stand up to ice, snow and freezing temperatures takes an expertise that only comes with experience. This is the case in the snowy and picturesque mountains of Park City, Utah. The city is a winter haven for skiers who vacation there, but the extended snow and cold season can deliver a beating to a roof.

The concrete tile roof and poorly ventilated deck were causing major problems for the building owner, not to mention the residents who live and rent there. Heat was escaping through the roof, causing the snow to melt and refreeze at the eaves.

The concrete tile roof and poorly ventilated deck were causing major problems for the building owner, not to mention the residents who live and rent there. Heat was escaping through the roof, causing the snow to melt and refreeze at the eaves.


The Grand Lodge at Deer Valley Resort, a luxury condominium development at one of North America’s top-ranked ski resorts, sits at an elevation of 9,000 feet in the mountainous area. Along with the breathtaking views comes an average annual snowfall of 350 inches. As a result, the 40,000-square-foot concrete tile roof of the lodge had begun to fail after only six years of intense weather and needed to be replaced immediately.

The concrete tile roof and poorly ventilated deck were causing major problems for the building owner, not to mention the residents who live and rent there. Heat was escaping through the roof, causing the snow to melt and refreeze at the eaves. Dangerous icicles would form, and noisy chainsaws were frequently needed to cut through the ice on the 5-story building. In 2013, the owner of the condominium decided to completely redesign the roofing system. IronClad Exteriors Inc., a Sandy, Utah-based roofing company had successfully installed roofs for Deer Valley in the past and was contacted by Deer Valley Resort Management to consult on the new design.

“Due to insufficient insulation and poor ventilation on the existing roof, ice dams were forming, tiles were cracking and the roof was falling apart,” says Eric Kircher, owner of IronClad Exteriors. “There was an architect involved in redesigning the roof … . I was asked to take a look at the design, and I recommended an asphalt shingle roof instead.

Kircher advised that a full asphalt roofing system with proper insulation and moisture protection would be able to withstand the harsh weather of the ski resort.

“Asphalt was the ideal material for the reroof for reasons that involve aesthetics, safety, and the long-term health and viability of the roof,” he notes. “I recommended a shake style because it really fit the architecture and look of the roof while being able to protect the building and residents from the weather conditions.”

Over the span of six months, IronClad Exteriors tore off the tile roof and installed a system they had used many times to help homeowners in the area protect their homes from ice and snow.

Over the span of six months, IronClad Exteriors tore off the tile roof and installed a system they had used many times to help homeowners in the area protect their homes from ice and snow.

Installation

Over the span of six months, IronClad Exteriors tore off the tile roof and installed a system they had used many times to help homeowners in the area protect their homes from ice and snow. FlintBoard ISO NB (Nail Base) Composite Polyisocyanurate/OSB Roof insulation was installed over the plywood deck, followed by a 3- by 10-inch fascia board. WinterGuard HT advanced waterproofing underlayment and DiamondDeck High Performance Synthetic Underlayment were then added to provide important moisture resistance. Finally, the Presidential Shake TL asphalt shingles provided a beautiful look that matched the lodge’s breathtaking surroundings. The project was completed in November 2014.

The Grand Lodge’s new asphalt roof also contains a unique feature that sets it apart in form and function. IronClad installed 11,000 copper snow guards that offer another layer of weather protection. Snow freezes around the copper pieces and keeps it from sliding down the roof to form dangerous ice dams at the eaves. Lodge residents no longer have to walk underneath potentially hazardous icicles or listen to the sounds of manlifts and chainsaws that are used to remove them.

“The roofing system we designed had the unique ability to withstand that type of cold environment,” Kircher notes. “There will be no heat loss contributing to ice and snow on the eaves, and the insulation protects the interior of the lodge. These are high-end condominiums with finished ceilings and no attic space at the top where you can put more insulation, so the insulation had to be installed on the existing roof deck to prevent ice dams.”

The installation process went smoothly despite the challenges brought on by Park City’s weather. Snow can begin to fall as early as September and lasts through the spring, providing little time for construction projects to take place. Fortunately, IronClad had extensive experience with the roofing systems needed in Park City.

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PIMA Announces Environmental Product Declarations for Polyiso Roof and Wall Insulations

Consistent with its delivery of energy-efficient and sustainable building insulation solutions, the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA) announced the receipt of third party-verified ISO-compliant Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs) for polyisocyanurate (polyiso) roof and wall insulations as manufactured by PIMA members across North America. An EPD is an internationally recognized and standardized tool that reports the environmental impacts of products.

These EPDs document that the energy-savings potential of polyiso roof and wall insulation during a typical 60-year building life span is equal to up to 47 times the initial energy required to produce, transport, install, maintain, and eventually remove and dispose of the insulation. In addition to a high return on embodied energy, the EPDs document that polyiso roof and wall insulation offer high unit R-value per inch, zero ozone depletion potential, recycled content, opportunity for reuse and outstanding fire performance.

Beyond providing consistent and comparable environmental impact data, the PIMA polyiso EPDs also present information about additional environmental and energy characteristics, including the high net return on energy provided by polyiso roof and wall insulation.

Specifically, the polyiso EPDs describe the environmental impacts of the combined weighted average production for PIMA member manufacturing locations located across the United States and Canada, based on an established set of product category rules applicable to all types of building thermal insulation. The environmental impacts reported in the PIMA polyiso EPDs are derived from independently verified cradle-to-grave life cycle assessment (LCA) process, including all critical elements related to the resourcing, production, transport, installation, maintenance, and eventual removal and replacement of polyiso roof and wall insulation.

Using the LCA process, the PIMA polyiso roof and wall insulation products are evaluated on a number of impact categories including global warming potential, ozone depletion potential, eutrophication potential, acidification potential, and smog creation potential, as well as other environmental indicators including primary energy demand, resource depletion, waste to disposal, waste to energy, and water use.

PIMA polyiso roof and wall insulation EPDs also meet the requirements of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) LEED v4 Green Building Rating System under Credit MRC-2 Building Product Disclosure and Optimization: Environmental Product Declarations as industry-wide or generic declarations that may be valued as one-half of an eligible product for the purposes of credit calculation.

“These third party-verified EPDs for polyiso roof and wall insulation products produced by PIMA manufacturers reflect our industry’s commitment to sustainability and transparency in reporting environmental performance,” says Jared Blum, president of PIMA. “These EPDs will be a valuable tool to provide environmental information to all building and design professionals, and they should be especially helpful in meeting emerging criteria for green building design.”