Roof Patch Covers Holes Left When Converting to Ridge Ventilation

The Smart Plug Roof Patch covers roof holes left by box, slant-back, and turbine vents when converting from static vents to ridge ventilation.

The Smart Plug Roof Patch covers roof holes left by box, slant-back, and turbine vents when converting from static vents to ridge ventilation.

Quarrix has unveiled its newest product offering, the Smart Plug Roof Patch, designed for roofing contractors looking to cover roof holes left by box, slant-back, and turbine vents when converting from static vents to ridge ventilation. Smart Plug installs with a nail gun and is made of 24-gauge galvanized steel and OSB sheeting, resulting in a 700-pound weight limit rating to ensure overall roof integrity. Smart Plug joins a full line of roofing-centric products from Quarrix.

Available in 8-inch and 12-inch square sizes to fit standard-sized holes left by box, slant-back and turbine static vents, Smart Plug also ensures roofing jobs will pass inspection requirements.

Smart Plug is available via Quarrix authorized wholesale distributors throughout the U.S., Canada and internationally, with all Quarrix products made in the USA. For more information, visit the Quarrix website or call (800) 438-2920 to locate the nearest dealer.

Roofing Sponsorship Secures Contractors More Jobs

An exclusive roofing category sponsorship between IKO and HomeAdvisor, members of IKO’s contractor programs now have access to project leads in their local regions to help them land additional jobs.

“In addition to offering a full suite of roofing products and accessories, one of the best ways to help our contractors close more sales is to connect them directly with people who are looking for a new roof or repairs in their area,” says Jeff Williams, brand director, IKO North America. “That’s what our partnership with HomeAdvisor is intended to do, help our contractors secure more leads to close more jobs locally.”

Current and new members who enroll in IKO’s contractor programs, IKO ShieldPRO plus+ (SPP) and IKO Shield, can enjoy exclusive membership perks and special benefits on HomeAdvisor, including discounts and rebates on real-time leads, a customizable profile, and verified ratings and reviews, among other benefits. When an owner searches for a roofing project, IKO is presented as the exclusive roofing sponsor in the initial category results on the HomeAdvisor website, giving the brand increased awareness among a number of consumers seeking local contractor professionals.

“HomeAdvisor offers pros the ability to reach project-ready owners via mobile, smart phone devices and Facebook,” says Scott Weigel, vice president of business development for HomeAdvisor. “And, by using HomeAdvisor’s on-demand scheduling tools, owners can speak with pros or book appointments directly on their calendars, providing value for IKO and its members.”

The sponsorship is expected to help build IKO’s brand and product awareness through a custom content hub where homeowners can view photos, watch videos, learn about products or redeem special offers. Additionally, IKO branding will also be featured in HomeAdvisor’s home and building partner network, including sites such as Build.com, 1800Contractor, Realtor.com, ImproveNet.com and more. 

DryHome Is Accepting Free Roof Nominations

DryHome Roofing and Siding in Sterling, Va., has begun to accept nominations for the annual Free Roof for the Holidays program.

This is the thirteenth year the company will provide a roof for a Northern Virginia individual, family or nonprofit in need of the repair. The roof will be awarded based on nominations DryHome receives from customers and the community through Dec. 1.

Nominations may be made online or by email at info@dryhome.com. Nominators should include their name and phone number as well as the nominee’s name, address, phone and reason why they are being nominated.

The Free Roof for the Holidays program is intended to thank DryHome customers and the community.

ICP Adhesives & Sealants Inc. Adopts Honeywell’s Solstice GBA

Honeywell has announced that ICP Adhesives & Sealants Inc. will use Honeywell’s Solstice Gas Blowing Agent (GBA) in its Handi-Foam High Density roof repair kits.

“We are proud to be making a change that not only improves the performance of our products, but positively impacts the world,” says Stefan Gantenbein, president, ICP Adhesives & Sealants Inc. “In addition to these kits, we are transitioning to Solstice GBA in our one-component aerosol can products and will soon be introducing a low-pressure foam mining product.”

Solstice GBA is based on hydrofluoro-olefin (HFO) technology. It is a near drop-in replacement for HFC blowing agents such as HFC-134a, delivering performance with a lower climate impact.
             
“ICP’s conversion to Solstice GBA is a milestone in the global adoption of Honeywell’s low-GWP product platform,” says Laura Reinhard, global business manager for spray foam, Honeywell. “The launch by ICP demonstrates Solstice GBA’s comparable advantages for low-pressure foam applications.”

Prior versions of the Handi-Foam repair kits used HFC-134a blowing agent. According to Mojee Cline, vice-president technology, ICP Adhesives, “The switch to Solstice GBA has allowed us to achieve a compressive strength in these repair kits that match typical foam densities on roofs. This provides the toughness needed to handle foot traffic and the durability that contractors require.”

Handi-Foam roof repair kits provide thermal performance, a smooth surface that can be coated, and a shelf life of at least 12 months. They offer contractors an alternative to high-pressure spray foam for repairing foam roofs. Another feature of the new kits is Handi-Gun II, the latest in ICP’s spray gun technology, offering a variable speed trigger among other features.

Solstice GBA has low GWP of less than 1, more than 99.9 percent lower than HFCs and also lower than carbon dioxide. It is nonflammable (ASTM E-681 and EU A11) and is not a volatile organic compound per the Environmental Protection Agency. Solstice LBA is listed under the EPA’s Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program. In Europe, it is not listed in the Annex I of F-Gas regulation and thus not considered an F-Gas. Solstice GBA is registered under the European Union’s REACH program. Honeywell’s Solstice GBA manufacturing plant in Louisiana started up in May 2014.

University of Wisconsin Madison Offers Metal Roofing Continuing Education Course

Anyone involved in metal roofing design, construction, commissioning, maintenance, repair, and re-roofing can benefit by enrolling in a new 1.5 day metal roofing continuing education course offered by the University of Wisconsin-Madison December 1-2, 2016.

The informative course will be taught by Robert Haddock, director of the Metal Roof Advisory Group. Haddock has a background in the nuts and bolts of contracting, having operated one of the nation’s largest metal roofing companies. He has authored a number of training and educational curricula for various trade groups. A prolific technical author, Haddock served as a faculty member of the Roofing Industry Educational Institute and holds several US and foreign patents. He is a member of the NRCA and ASTM, as well as a lifetime honorary member of the Systems Builders Association and the Metal Construction Association.

Topics covered in the metal roofing continuing education course include:
• The History of Metal Roofing
• Metal Roofing Fundamentals
• Metal Roofing Materials
• Codes/Standards
• Panel Types, Attributes and Connections
• Roof Deck Substrates
• Common Metal Roof Accessories
• Safety Issues
• Tools and Field Operations
• Low and Steep Slope Standing Seams
• Seam Joining
• Sealants and Fasteners
• Re-Roofing/Roof Conversion with Metal
• Metal Tile and Shingle
• Snow Retention
• The Solar Metal Roof
• Maintenance

Gain insight on this ancient but fascinating field by enrolling now in this highly anticipated course. For additional course details and to enroll online, visit: epd.wisc.edu/RA01501.

‘The International Energy Conservation Code as Applied to Commercial Roofing’ Brochure Is Released

A new energy code brochure, “The International Energy Conservation Code as Applied to Commercial Roofing”, has been released explaining reroofing clarifications in the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The reroofing clarifications make it very clear that almost every commercial reroofing project involving the removal and replacement of the existing roof covering must be upgraded to the current IECC R-value levels.

The Institute for Market Transformation (IMT), with the assistance of the Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing (the Center) and the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Associations (PIMA), developed and released the new energy code brochure.

“Billions of square feet of low-slope of commercial roofs (roofs with insulation above the deck) are replaced every year in the United States,” said Jared Blum, President, PIMA. “The clarification in the IECC means that whenever an existing low-slope roofing membrane is removed before a new roofing membrane is installed, the underlying roof insulation must be brought up to current code-mandated R-value levels.”

The new code clarification establishes specific definitions for each major type of roofing activity that may occur on a commercial building:

    Reroofing. The process of recovering or replacing an existing roof covering. See Roof Recover and Roof Replacement.
    Roof Recover. The process of installing an additional roof covering over a prepared existing roof covering without removing the existing roof covering.
    Roof Replacement. The process of removing an existing roof covering, repairing any damaged substrate and installing a new roof covering.
    Roof Repair. Reconstruction or renewal of any part of an existing roof for the purposes of its maintenance.

The new brochure, similar in format to many other IMT brochures, contains:

  • A detailed listing of the key definitions and energy regulations that apply to commercial roofing.
  • Illustrations of typical roofing conditions.
  • A decision tree to determine the specific compliance path for any roofing application.

“Because it is considered a clarification rather than a new addition to the code, officials can start enforcing the update now and don’t have to wait until the 2015 version of the IECC is adopted in their jurisdiction. This brochure is succinct, easy to follow and clearly explains how to comply with the clarification,” added Blum.

“The International Energy Conservation Code as Applied to Commercial Roofing” brochure will help local code officials better understand the energy efficiency requirements for all types of commercial roofing projects and also serve as a useful guide to explain the code requirements to roofing contractors seeking construction permits, design professionals (architects, engineers, roof consultants) involved in roofing selection and specification, as well as building owners as the ultimate end-user of the code.

“The brochure is a part of a comprehensive effort by PIMA to inform members of the design community about their legal obligations to comply with the reroofing energy upgrade requirement,” added Blum.

In addition to advocating for increased building energy efficiency via improved building codes, IMT also works to increase compliance with energy codes by developing and distributing informational materials suitable for use in local code jurisdictions, not only for code officials but also for owners, designers, and contractors.

Insulation and Roof Replacements

When existing roofs (that are part of the building’s thermal envelope) are removed and replaced and when the roof assembly includes above-deck insulation, the energy code now requires that the insulation levels comply with the requirements for new construction, according to a proposal approved by International Code Council at public comment hearings held in October 2013.

This high-performance roof system was recently installed on a high school north of Chicago. It features two layers of 3-inch 25-psi, double-coated fiberglass-faced polyisocyanurate insulation set in bead-foam adhesive at 4 inches on center, weighted with five 5-gallon pails of adhesive per 4- by 4-foot board to ensure a positive bond into the bead foam until set. PHOTO: Hutchinson Design Group LLC

This high-performance roof system was recently installed on a high school north of Chicago. It features two layers of 3-inch 25-psi, double-coated fiberglass-faced polyisocyanurate insulation set in bead-foam adhesive at 4 inches on center, weighted with five 5-gallon pails of adhesive per 4- by 4-foot board to ensure a positive bond into the bead foam until set. PHOTO: Hutchinson Design Group LLC

As a result of this proposal approval, the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) provides new language that provides clear unambiguous direction on how the energy code provisions apply to roof repair, roof recover and roof replacement.

Until this update there was a great deal of confusion given the various terms—such as reroofing, roof repair, roof recover and roof replacement—used to describe roofing projects on existing buildings in the International Building Code and the IECC. The clarification will help to mitigate this confusion.

Numerous studies have demonstrated the energy savings provided by a well-insulated roofing system. It is critical to minimize energy losses and upgrade insulation levels when roofs are replaced to comply with code requirements for new construction.

Each year about 2.5 billion square feet of roof coverings are installed on existing buildings and the opportunity to upgrade the insulation levels on these roof systems occurs just once in several decades when the roof is replaced or even longer when existing roofs are “recovered”. Until recently this requirement was prescribed using vague and confusing language, as noted.

Moving forward the IECC will use the same definitions found in the International Building code:

  • Reroofing: The process of recovering or replacing an existing roof covering. See “Roof Recover” and “Roof Replacement”.
  • Roof Recover: The process of installing an additional roof covering over a prepared existing roof covering without removing the existing roof covering.
  • Roof Replacement: The process of removing the existing roof covering, repairing any damaged substrate and installing a new roof covering.
  • Roof Repair: Reconstruction or renewal of any part of an existing roof for the purposes of its maintenance.

A survey of building departments in many states and regions in the U.S. found that online roofing permit application forms rarely included any information on the energy code and required insulation levels. With the changes to the 2015 IECC, it will be easier for building departments to correlate the building code and energy code requirements for roof replacements.

The clarification to the 2015 IECC makes the code easier to interpret and enforce. Along the way, it will help ensure that the opportunity to save energy when replacing roofs is not lost.

Another benefit of this update is that the exemption for roof repair is now clearly defined making it easier for building owners and roofing contractors to perform routine maintenance without triggering energy-efficiency upgrades, which would add costs.