Kirberg Co. Receives BBB TORCH Award

Kirberg Co. receives the 2016 BBB TORCH Award from the Better Business Bureau.

Kirberg Co. receives the 2016 BBB TORCH Award from the Better Business Bureau.

Kirberg Co., St. Louis, has received the 2016 BBB TORCH Award from the Better Business Bureau (BBB) serving eastern Missouri and southern Illinois. The award recognizes the company’s commitment to customer service through exceptional standards for ethical business practices.

Laura Toledo, executive director of the Center for Women in Transition, St. Louis, nominated Kirberg Co. for the TORCH Award. In 2015, Kirberg Co. donated $36,000 in labor and materials to install a new roof at the Baker House, one of two transitional living facilities operated by the center.

“We are all extremely grateful for the generous donation of a complete roof replacement from Kirberg in 2015,” Toledo states. “They also coordinated with other contractors to make sure the job was done well and at no cost to the agency. Kirberg has continued to support the mission of the Center for Women in Transition in numerous ways since then. Kirberg is an excellent company that is dedicated to its community.”

Through practicing and promoting restorative justice, the Center for Women in Transition assists women in the criminal justice system to successfully transition back to their families and communities. The women are offered safe, stable housing through the center, as well as case management; life-skills instruction; guidance from volunteer mentors; and assistance with locating jobs and accessing other resources, such as substance-abuse treatment, medical and mental health care.

Eric Kirberg, president of Kirberg Co., accepted the TORCH Award and says: “We were delighted to be able to help our friends at the Center for Women in Transition. The center provides a wonderful service here in town, and a new roof was badly needed. Now the apartment building will remain open to help hundreds of women for years to come.”

Having provided nearly 100 years of service to the St. Louis community, Kirberg Co. installs nearly every type of roof system from slate and tile to flat-roof applications, vegetated and solar-power systems. With 90 field employees in St. Louis and approximately 50 in its branches, Kirberg Co. is committed to exceeding customer expectations.

“Getting roofs done right the first time, that’s always been our motto,” Kirberg notes. “When our roofers are as good as they are, it’s easy to have good customer service when the work is almost perfect.”

“BBB’s TORCH Awards celebrate exceptional companies with great customer service and ethics,” adds Scott Mosby, BBB board chair and chief executive of Mosby Building Arts, St. Louis. “Start with trust, honor the exceptional and learn from the best is our practice within St. Louis BBB. These companies and charities are examples to emulate for anyone who wants to be trusted in the marketplace.”

Learn more about Kirberg Co. at the website; visit the BBB’s website.

PHOTO: Kirberg Co.

DryHome Is Accepting Free Roof Nominations

DryHome Roofing and Siding in Sterling, Va., has begun to accept nominations for the annual Free Roof for the Holidays program.

This is the thirteenth year the company will provide a roof for a Northern Virginia individual, family or nonprofit in need of the repair. The roof will be awarded based on nominations DryHome receives from customers and the community through Dec. 1.

Nominations may be made online or by email at info@dryhome.com. Nominators should include their name and phone number as well as the nominee’s name, address, phone and reason why they are being nominated.

The Free Roof for the Holidays program is intended to thank DryHome customers and the community.

Observe National Roofing Week by Making Informed Decisions About Roof System Maintenance

To increase recognition of the significance of roofs to every home and business, stress the value of professional roofing contractors, bring attention to the value of a career in roofing and promote the good deeds of the industry, the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) is urging communities throughout the U.S. to recognize National Roofing Week taking place June 5-11.

The roof is one of the most important components of a structure, yet it is often taken for granted until it falls into disrepair. During National Roofing Week, NRCA encourages its members to participate by engaging in their communities and informing the public about the essential role roofs and professional roofing contractors play in every community.

Most roof systems last more than 20 years; however, routine evaluation and maintenance is necessary to extend its life and keep overall costs down. NRCA urges consumers to observe National Roofing Week by paying attention to wear and tear on their roof systems, and to make informed decisions about roof system maintenance and replacement.

NRCA will recognize National Roofing Week by highlighting the work, training and good deeds of its members and their employees on its various social media outlets. The winners of NRCA’s third annual children’s art contest will also be announced. Children in grades one through eight, who are relatives of NRCA members and their employees submitted artwork depicting the importance of roofs and the professional roofing contractor.

Contest winners will have their artwork featured on all National Roofing Week material and additional promotional material to be displayed at industry events throughout the year, including the 2017 International Roofing Expo and NRCA’s 130th Annual Convention in Las Vegas.

Roof Restoration Coating System Is an Alternative to Complete Roof Replacement

The Metacrylics Roof Restoration System is an alternative to a complete roof replacement and tear-off.

The Metacrylics Roof Restoration System is an alternative to a complete roof replacement and tear-off.

The Metacrylics Roof Restoration System is an alternative to a complete roof replacement and tear-off. It provides adhesion to a variety of existing roof systems to form a monolithic, waterproofing membrane, protecting your roof system from further weathering, UV deterioration, moisture, wind and thermal shock—elements that reduce the life of a roof system. The results is a seamless, reflective, economical solution providing many benefits, including a CRRC and ENERGY STAR system that exceeds all Title 24 requirements.

Benefits:

  • Saves energy
  • Environmentally friendly
  • No tear-off
  • Reduces heat transfer
  • Keeps building cool
  • Withstands ponding
  • Low-cost maintenance
  • Quick and easy installation
  • Super adhesion to a variety of surfaces
  • VOC compliant
  • Sprayer or roller applied
  • Chemical and fire resistant
  • Excellent wind resistance

Metacrylics 3-Second Acrylic is in the final stage of development and will be available this summer. It can be sprayed to any mil thickness in a single pass because of its instant set time.

The 3-Second Acrylic is a two-part, water-based, non-flammable, non-solvent, low-VOC product that has excellent adhesion and very low perms.

‘The International Energy Conservation Code as Applied to Commercial Roofing’ Brochure Is Released

A new energy code brochure, “The International Energy Conservation Code as Applied to Commercial Roofing”, has been released explaining reroofing clarifications in the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The reroofing clarifications make it very clear that almost every commercial reroofing project involving the removal and replacement of the existing roof covering must be upgraded to the current IECC R-value levels.

The Institute for Market Transformation (IMT), with the assistance of the Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing (the Center) and the Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Associations (PIMA), developed and released the new energy code brochure.

“Billions of square feet of low-slope of commercial roofs (roofs with insulation above the deck) are replaced every year in the United States,” said Jared Blum, President, PIMA. “The clarification in the IECC means that whenever an existing low-slope roofing membrane is removed before a new roofing membrane is installed, the underlying roof insulation must be brought up to current code-mandated R-value levels.”

The new code clarification establishes specific definitions for each major type of roofing activity that may occur on a commercial building:

    Reroofing. The process of recovering or replacing an existing roof covering. See Roof Recover and Roof Replacement.
    Roof Recover. The process of installing an additional roof covering over a prepared existing roof covering without removing the existing roof covering.
    Roof Replacement. The process of removing an existing roof covering, repairing any damaged substrate and installing a new roof covering.
    Roof Repair. Reconstruction or renewal of any part of an existing roof for the purposes of its maintenance.

The new brochure, similar in format to many other IMT brochures, contains:

  • A detailed listing of the key definitions and energy regulations that apply to commercial roofing.
  • Illustrations of typical roofing conditions.
  • A decision tree to determine the specific compliance path for any roofing application.

“Because it is considered a clarification rather than a new addition to the code, officials can start enforcing the update now and don’t have to wait until the 2015 version of the IECC is adopted in their jurisdiction. This brochure is succinct, easy to follow and clearly explains how to comply with the clarification,” added Blum.

“The International Energy Conservation Code as Applied to Commercial Roofing” brochure will help local code officials better understand the energy efficiency requirements for all types of commercial roofing projects and also serve as a useful guide to explain the code requirements to roofing contractors seeking construction permits, design professionals (architects, engineers, roof consultants) involved in roofing selection and specification, as well as building owners as the ultimate end-user of the code.

“The brochure is a part of a comprehensive effort by PIMA to inform members of the design community about their legal obligations to comply with the reroofing energy upgrade requirement,” added Blum.

In addition to advocating for increased building energy efficiency via improved building codes, IMT also works to increase compliance with energy codes by developing and distributing informational materials suitable for use in local code jurisdictions, not only for code officials but also for owners, designers, and contractors.

The Success of Your New (Replacement) Roof Depends on Adjacent and Connected Elements, including Masonry

Although the name of this publication is Roofing, the roofing/waterproofing/construction industry recognizes more and more that the building envelope is a fully integrated and interrelated assembly of systems.

masonry cracks due to freeze thaw

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As such, I feel the need to discuss the importance of water resistance and structural integrity in existing wall surfaces, which are adjacent and connected to your project’s new (replacement) roof system. The focus of this article is not how to design a replacement roof system but how to address adjacent masonry to ensure it doesn’t work against the success of the new roof.

These principles actually apply to any wall system that connects, generally above and adjacent, to your roof, but masonry poses some distinct concerns. Water intrusion, thermal movement and structural integrity of this masonry, along with locations of embedded flashing, all come into play as the new roof system is properly integrated into the adjacent rising wall, parapet wall or even perimeter edge wall beneath the roof.

COMMON MASONRY ISSUES

Thomas W. Hutchinson, AIA, FRCI, RRC, a regular Roofing contributor, has said, “long-term service life is the true essence of sustainability”. Moreover, designers specify (for owners to buy) warranties of 20, 25 years or more with new roof systems. It’s just good common sense that you can’t allow a new roof to be jeopardized by water intrusion from an adjacent system because of an oversight in the original analysis of the situation.

Many of us have been called by an owner who says his or her new roof is leaking, only to find roof-mounted equipment or an unrelated system is actually leaking. However, if the leak is stemming from another aspect of the building envelope, such as an adjacent parapet or rising wall, which is now jeopardizing the investment made on a new roof, that you (the designer) should have foreseen, it makes for a very difficult position. The roofing system manufacturer, who holds the warranty, and the owner are going to look at you as being responsible.

masonry

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Let’s examine three common occurrences using actual case studies. All three situations, which occurred on schools in the Northeast, exemplify the condition of adjacent masonry was deficient and had to be corrected, adding a significant degree of scope and cost to the project to guarantee a roof design that would perform over the long haul. These three cases cover:
1. Repairing the masonry and covering it.
2. Altering the masonry to change the location of embedded flashings.
3. Replacing structurally unsound/failed masonry with another material.

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Insulation and Roof Replacements

When existing roofs (that are part of the building’s thermal envelope) are removed and replaced and when the roof assembly includes above-deck insulation, the energy code now requires that the insulation levels comply with the requirements for new construction, according to a proposal approved by International Code Council at public comment hearings held in October 2013.

This high-performance roof system was recently installed on a high school north of Chicago. It features two layers of 3-inch 25-psi, double-coated fiberglass-faced polyisocyanurate insulation set in bead-foam adhesive at 4 inches on center, weighted with five 5-gallon pails of adhesive per 4- by 4-foot board to ensure a positive bond into the bead foam until set. PHOTO: Hutchinson Design Group LLC

This high-performance roof system was recently installed on a high school north of Chicago. It features two layers of 3-inch 25-psi, double-coated fiberglass-faced polyisocyanurate insulation set in bead-foam adhesive at 4 inches on center, weighted with five 5-gallon pails of adhesive per 4- by 4-foot board to ensure a positive bond into the bead foam until set. PHOTO: Hutchinson Design Group LLC

As a result of this proposal approval, the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) provides new language that provides clear unambiguous direction on how the energy code provisions apply to roof repair, roof recover and roof replacement.

Until this update there was a great deal of confusion given the various terms—such as reroofing, roof repair, roof recover and roof replacement—used to describe roofing projects on existing buildings in the International Building Code and the IECC. The clarification will help to mitigate this confusion.

Numerous studies have demonstrated the energy savings provided by a well-insulated roofing system. It is critical to minimize energy losses and upgrade insulation levels when roofs are replaced to comply with code requirements for new construction.

Each year about 2.5 billion square feet of roof coverings are installed on existing buildings and the opportunity to upgrade the insulation levels on these roof systems occurs just once in several decades when the roof is replaced or even longer when existing roofs are “recovered”. Until recently this requirement was prescribed using vague and confusing language, as noted.

Moving forward the IECC will use the same definitions found in the International Building code:

  • Reroofing: The process of recovering or replacing an existing roof covering. See “Roof Recover” and “Roof Replacement”.
  • Roof Recover: The process of installing an additional roof covering over a prepared existing roof covering without removing the existing roof covering.
  • Roof Replacement: The process of removing the existing roof covering, repairing any damaged substrate and installing a new roof covering.
  • Roof Repair: Reconstruction or renewal of any part of an existing roof for the purposes of its maintenance.

A survey of building departments in many states and regions in the U.S. found that online roofing permit application forms rarely included any information on the energy code and required insulation levels. With the changes to the 2015 IECC, it will be easier for building departments to correlate the building code and energy code requirements for roof replacements.

The clarification to the 2015 IECC makes the code easier to interpret and enforce. Along the way, it will help ensure that the opportunity to save energy when replacing roofs is not lost.

Another benefit of this update is that the exemption for roof repair is now clearly defined making it easier for building owners and roofing contractors to perform routine maintenance without triggering energy-efficiency upgrades, which would add costs.