MBCI’s Retro-R Panel Is Florida Approved for Roof Applications

MBCI’s Retro-R panel has received statewide Florida approval by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation as FL21121 for roof applications. The certificate of product approval can be accessed via the Florida Building Code Information System.

Retro-R is an exposed-fastened panel with rib spacing 12 inches on center, a rib height of 1-1/16 inches, and minimum slope of ½:12. It has been approved as a minimum 26-gauge panel installed over an existing minimum 29-gauge PBR panel. It includes a Drip Stop membrane to prevent rust from the old roof from transferring to the new panel.

This panel allows the existing roof to stay in place during installation, saving on labor costs while minimizing the chance for water entry into the building, reducing interruptions to building operations and providing a safer working environment. Existing roof-top equipment, vents or light transmitting panels can all be accommodated by the Retro-R system.

For more information on Retro-R, visit the product page or download the product brochure.

The Integration of Roof and Brick Requires Concise Details

PHOTO 1: The through-wall flashing stainless-steel drip can be observed projecting nicely from the wall—but the termination of the roof base flashing more than 1-inch below resulted in a section of the brick wall that allows water to pass into the wall below the through-wall flashing and behind the roof base flashing, resulting in the damage seen in Photo 2.

PHOTO 1: The through-wall flashing stainless-steel drip can be observed projecting nicely from the wall—but the termination of the roof base flashing more than 1-inch below resulted in a section of the brick wall that allows water to pass into the wall below the through-wall flashing and behind the roof base flashing, resulting in the damage seen in Photo 2.

Projects are perceived to be successful by their ability to prevent disturbance from weather, including rain. Have you ever heard two architects talking about Frank Lloyd Wright?

“What a genius! His spatial conception is magnificent, even after 100 years.”

“But all his buildings leak!”

I used to give a talk to University of Illinois architecture students in which I told them the quickest way to go out of business is to be sued. The quickest way to be sued is to have a building allow moisture intrusion. If he were alive today, Frank Lloyd Wright—God rest his soul—would be in jail (and a few current architects may be well on their way). Owners are not very kind when their “babies” leak.

Many roof termination interfaces are never even thought about by designers and are left to the roofing contractor to work out. This is not a recommended practice. One such condition—that every architect should be able to detail—is how the roof base flashing terminates at a masonry wall that has through-wall flashing and weeps at the base of the wall above the roof. I believe so fervently that architects should be proficient in detailing these conditions that I believe it should be required to procure their license.

WHY THE IMPORTANCE

The interface of roof base flashing and masonry through-wall systems occurs on a majority of commercial construction projects. If this transition is not performed correctly, moisture intrusion behind the roof base flashing to the interior will occur (see Photo 2). When this occurs, besides angering owners, it befuddles the architect. Photo 1 (left) shows a nice through-wall flashing drip extended out from the wall, weeps and roofing terminated with a termination bar and sealant. What could be wrong?

PHOTO 2: Moisture intrusion at the base of this wall was the result of water circumventing the through-wall flashing and roof base flashing termination seen in Photo 1. A big concern with conditions, such as this, is the propensity of the materials to promote mold growth.

PHOTO 2: Moisture intrusion at the base of this wall was the result of water circumventing the through-wall flashing
and roof base flashing termination seen in Photo 1. A big concern with conditions, such as this, is the propensity of the materials to promote mold growth.

The exposed brick above the termination bar and below the stain- less-steel drip of the through-wall flashing is susceptible to water flowing down the surface of the brick. Water passing through the brick above is supposed to be weeped out; however, at the exposed brick above the termination bar, the water moves into the wall and has nowhere to go but inward.

The cost to repair these conditions can be, depending on the conditions, expensive. Repairs often require brick removal and through-wall flashing mitigation. In this particular case, be- cause there is a stainless-steel drip, my team recommended a stainless-steel counterflashing be pop-riveted to the drip and extended over the termination bar.

CHALLENGES

Why is the interface of roof base flashing and masonry through-wall systems so difficult for architects and roof consultants to detail? I believe it is because they have no clue it needs to be detailed as an interface, especially because detailing of appropriate through-wall systems is so sporadic. I endeavor in this article to change at least the knowledge part.

The detailing of this condition not only requires the ability to interface two building systems, but also requires considerable time to ensure specification of wall sectional details and roofing details are appropriately placed where the responsible trades will see them.

PHOTO 3: Still under construction, the stainless-steel counterflashing has been installed. The roof base flashing will terminate below the stainless-steel counterflashing receiver. Hutch prefers brick below the through-wall flashing and above the roof deck, though the masonry mortar joints below the through-wall flashing should have been struck flush.

PHOTO 3: Still under construction, the stainless-steel counterflashing has
been installed. The roof base flashing will terminate below the stainless-steel counterflashing receiver. Hutch prefers brick below the through-wall flashing and above the roof deck, though the masonry mortar joints below the through-wall flashing should have been struck flush.

NEW CONSTRUCTION

New construction provides us a clean slate to “do it right the first time”. The first order of business is to determine the height of the base flashing. This can be tricky with tapered insulation and slope structures with saddles. Let’s consider the following examples (see Detail 4, page 3):

EXAMPLE 1
We are dealing with a flat roof, tapered insulation, cover board and bead-foam insulation in ASHRAE Climate Zone 5, which has an R-30 minimum.

  • The roof drain is 32-feet away from the wall. Code requires 5.2 inches of insulation at 4 feet from the drain, so let’s assume 5 inches at the drain.
  • 1/4-inch tapered starts at 1/2 inch at 32 feet. That’s 8 inches, plus the starting thickness of 1/2 inch, which equals 8 1/2 inches.
  • Cover-board thickness is 1/2 inch.
  • Bead foam thickness is 3/16 inch for each layer. Let’s assume five layers, so 1 foot of bead foam.
  • Thus, the surface of the roof at the wall will be 15 inches above the roof deck.

Because you would like to work at the masonry coursing level and given that concrete masonry units (CMU) are nominal 8 inches, you are looking at placing the through-wall flashing 24 inches above the roof deck.

This 24-inch dimension of where to place the through-wall flashing needs to be placed on the building section and/or wall section because the mason, which will be onsite prior to the roofing contractor, will need to know this information.

This 24-inch height begs another termination question: What occurs at the roof edge with this height? Hold that thought for now. Terminations at intersections will be discussed in future articles.

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Fleece-Backed Thermoplastic Membrane Exceeds Weathering Tests

KEE-Stone FB 60 fleece-backed thermoplastic membrane stands up agains harsh weather and UV radiation.

KEE-Stone FB 60 fleece-backed thermoplastic membrane stands up against harsh weather and UV radiation.

Garland has released the KEE-Stone FB 60 fleece-backed thermoplastic membrane which exceeds standard weathering tests and stands up against harsh weather and UV radiation. In accelerated weathering tests, KEE-Stone showed no signs of cracking or cratering even at 100 times magnification, which is 10 times more than the ASTM D 6745 standard requires. KEE-Stone’s compound, formulated using DuPont Elvaloy HP Ketone Ethylene Ester (KEE), provides resistance to UV degradation and heat resistance while retaining low-temperature flexibility, which translates into a lasting roof.

KEE enhances the performance of the PVC by permanently locking in its flexibility, eliminating plasticizer migration and allowing the membrane to remain tough and flexible throughout the entire lifecycle of the roof. Garland’s KEE-Stone membranes contain the KEE formulation throughout the entire sheet, further increasing its level of performance. The membrane is also reinforced with a polymer-coated scrim. The design of the scrim allows the KEE compound above and below the scrim to fuse together, imparting puncture, tear and tensile strength to the membrane.

Garland’s two-ply, hybrid KEE-Stone system will provide the protection of a traditional modified bitumen roof system with the appearance of a single-ply system.

For more information, visit here or call to be connected with your local Garland representative at 1.800.321.9336.

Boral Roofing Introduces Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections Brochure

Boral Roofing Introduces Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections Brochure for the Florida region.

Boral Roofing Introduces Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections Brochure for the Florida region.

Boral Roofing introduces its Florida Concrete Roof Tile Collections brochure. The brochure provides an overview of products designed for the Florida region, including color graphics of its premium and standard profiles and colors.

Boral Roofing has been serving the Florida market for over 30 years. By focusing on innovations in manufacturing, Boral offers durability. The two Boral facilities in Florida provide pre-blended tile colors creating traditional, transitional, and contemporary looks for architectural styles.

Aesthetic value is not the only thing Boral offers. The company also offers an energy efficient roof system. The Boral Cool Roof System uses five components to reduce attic temperatures providing up to a 22% reduction in heating and cooling costs.

MiaSolé Solar Modules Are IEC and UL Certified and Class A Fire Rated

MiaSolé's CIGS-based, thin-film FLEX-02 solar modules are IEC 61646, IEC 61730, UL 1703 certified and UL 790 Class A fire rated.

MiaSolé’s CIGS-based, thin-film FLEX-02 solar modules are IEC 61646, IEC 61730, UL 1703 certified and UL 790 Class A fire rated.

MiaSolé announces that its CIGS-based, thin-film FLEX-02 solar modules are IEC 61646, IEC 61730, UL 1703 certified and UL 790 Class A fire rated. The MiaSolé FLEX module is a high-efficiency flexible, lightweight thin-film solar module, with production efficiencies of 16 percent. The FLEX module provides high power density for many types of applications—from roofing to reservoir and landfill covers, to auto, truck and other transportation applications through off-grid and consumer applications. The FLEX modules are produced in high volume at MiaSolé’s Heyuan, China, factory, which has passed UL, IEC and ISO9001 qualifications.

FLEX-02 modules provide customers significant benefits. The low weight of the module (less than 0.7 pound per square foot) allows installation on roofs and other structures that cannot support the weight of traditional glass solar panels. Because the FLEX-02 modules adhere directly to the surface of the structure or object, there are no penetrations or damage. The FLEX-02 is also aesthetically pleasing, blending into roofs, vehicles and other structures and preserving the original look without unsightly racking. The low-profile FLEX-02 module provides wind resistance and a seismic advantage over traditional rack-and-panel systems where their higher profile increases the likelihood of damage in a hurricane or earthquake.