New Utility Tray Accessory for Platform Material Hoist

Safety Hoist Company introduces The Utility Tray XL. Easily installed on the EH-500 and HD-400 hoist models, the newly designed Utility Tray is manufactured for versatility. The pre-assembled tray is a steel fabrication and measures 44 inches wide by 25 inches deep and 12 inches high. The Utility Tray includes two Deck Extenders, which expand the carriage width to 45 inches, allowing greater support for rolled goods. Using the Utility Tray XL, contractors cab safely lift items such as tiles, buckets, tools, HVAC units and other construction materials.

For more information, visit www.safetyhoistcompany.com.

Temporary Anchor Point Is Easy to Install, Won’t Damage Metal Roofs

Metal Plus, LLC introduces the Universal Safety Anchor (USA), a temporary anchor point with a unique hinge-system designed to accommodate most panels without any loose components. According to the manufacturer, the Universal Safety Anchor is easy to install: just open, close, and torque. It requires no adjusting of set screws.

The patented Universal Safety Anchor was designed to eliminate problems including damage to metal panels from set screws, rusting of panels when anchor points are removed, and voiding the manufacturer’s warranty.

For more information, visit www.metalplusllc.com.

Rebar Chain Assembly Allows Hands-Free Repositioning at Heights

Malta Dynamics introduces its 24-inch rebar chain assembly positioning device. The device is designed to allow workers to reposition themselves hands-free while elevated off the ground. It is ideal for applications on rebar structures, allowing workers to lean away from the wall and position themselves safely and easily while keeping their hands free to work. 

According to the manufacturer, the rebar chain assembly meets or exceeds the fall protection and testing standards laid out by ANSI Z359.3-17, ANSI A10.32-12, OSHA 1926 Subpart M, and OSHA 1910. Workers must still be connected to a fall arrest device when using this product, which is designed without shock absorbers. It is designed to be used in conjunction with a full-body harness, attaching to side D-Rings via both snap hooks and attaching the rebar hook to the rebar structure.

The 24-inch rebar chain assembly features a swiveling rebar hook and durable twist-link chain construction that allows for maximum mobility and strength. These units are designed with durability and strength in mind and have a maximum weight capacity of 310 pounds. They are lightweight and adjustable, making them convenient and easy to use on the jobsite.

“We manufacture products that we ourselves benefit from using every day in our masonry and construction businesses,” said Damian Lang, owner and CEO of Malta Dynamics. “We’re excited to offer our customers a high-quality, affordable tool that delivers maximum safety, mobility, and comfort when working on rebar structures.”

For more information, visit www.maltadynamics.com.

Reflecting on Your Life Will Change the Way You Think About Safety

As part of a “Bring It On Home” safety talk, audience members draw pictures of simple pleasures they enjoy. Photos: Richard Hawk

Tiny loves to play pool. But he can’t. We’ve spent many hours together around a pool table. I’m an avid pool player too. My wife once jokingly told me, “You spend more time with Tiny than you do with me.” I replied, “That’s because he plays pool better than you do!”

I’m praying that one day Tiny will be able to beat me on the table again. You see, on January 23, 2016, just a mile or so from his home Tiny lost control of his car and hit a telephone pole. The impact broke two of his vertebrae, severing part of his spinal cord. (James is his given name. He got the nickname “Tiny” from his dad because he was a “tiny” baby.) Thankfully Tiny didn’t die because of the accident, but he did lose a lot of mobility. Initially he was diagnosed as a quadriplegic, but now he can use his hands, arms and has partial use of his legs. Much of his recovery is due to intensive and painful physical therapy.

During my many years in the safety and health field, I’ve conducted dozens of incident investigations, including ones that involved fatalities. All of them made me sad, but this was the first time such a close friend has had a horrible, life-changing injury. Tiny’s accident gave me a deeper insight into why it’s so important for you and I to take safety seriously on and off the job and why it’s worth the effort to follow safety rules even when they seem inconvenient.

The most common comments victims of horrible injuries relate include “I can’t believe this has happened to me,” and “It’s worse than I expected,” or something similar. Another pool opponent of mine is a roofer. He fell a short distance off a ladder and injured his hip. At first, it wasn’t that big of a deal. But a couple years later he had to get the hip replaced, and an infection set in that nearly cost him his life. He told me that even though he’s been on roofs for more than 20 years, it was a big surprise how serious his injury turned out to be. He said that his injury gave him more respect for what can happen when you fall, even if it’s only a few feet.

One thing we often don’t realize about the consequences of a serious injury is how many different parts of our daily activities it will affect, particularly our simple pleasures. Tiny can’t drive, cook, play pool, take walks, or go to the bathroom the way he did before the accident. And many other personal activities have been taken away from him. His wife has had to alter her life drastically too. Even Tiny’s dog misses his owner’s mobility because Tiny used to walk with him twice a day.

Whether you’re on a roof, platform or inspecting a jobsite, if you have to tie off, set up a barrier or take the time for some other safety precaution that you feel you should skip or isn’t worth the effort, ask yourself if the temporary benefit of saving a few moments and avoiding a minor inconvenience is worth losing a common pleasure you enjoy every day — for the rest of your life.

I’m not a doomsayer or a “safety nerd” who isn’t fun-loving. And I understand as research has shown that “scare tactics” don’t have a strong effect on people’s behavior. That’s why I recommend you think positively about your safe behavior. Feel glad that you have the sense to work safely so you can enjoy simple pleasures with your friends and family.

During my “Bring It On Home” safety talk, I get everyone in the audience to draw a simple pleasure they enjoy regularly. The exercise is humorous because most people don’t have great drawing skills, so there are a lot of stick figures and “what’s that!?” objects on the sheets I give out. But many of the scenes are touching and depict activities with sons and daughters, pets and hobbies.

After holding up and describing a few “masterpieces,” I show a video of an interview I gave with Tiny, which he agreed to of course. (If you would like to see or use the video, just send me a request at richard@makesafetyfun.com.) It’s mostly about some of the things he misses since his accident and how his injury has impacted his simple pleasures. Tiny also talks about the strain it has put on his family and friends.

One topic I include in my “Bring It On Home” talk is the importance of teaching our children about safety. This has a twofold value. One, it helps our children stay safe and prepares them for their adult working life. Second, and much research has shown this to be true, any practices or values you teach your children you’re more likely to follow yourself. That’s not always the case; for example, some parents smoke but tell their children it is bad for them. Generally, however, it does have a positive effect on us when we teach our children positive behaviors.

Being a full-time safety professional while my children were growing up, I regularly taught them about safety. I even taught them how to wear a respirator! You can see from the picture; it took a bit of training to get them to wear their dust masks properly. But even today, after 30-plus years, my children still humorously remember how they were the only kids they knew who wore dust masks while doing yard work with their dad.

Safety involves every aspect of our life, not just what we do at work. That’s why teaching our children about safety, realizing how much a serious injury will affect our enjoyment of our entire life, and how much our families and friends will suffer too from our mishap can help us avoid taking shortcuts or doing something we know is dangerous.

Tiny is slowly getting better. He still mostly gets around in a wheelchair, but with the help of a walker, he can take a few steps. I drive him to rehab on occasions and play chess with him instead of pool. He may be able to drive soon, which is a something he misses dearly. Both of us are still amazed how much his injury has changed his life.

My favorite simple pleasure is drinking coffee with my wife in the morning while watching the birds on our feeders. I don’t want to lose that because I was careless. How about you? What simple pleasure do you protect by being safe on and off the job?

About the Author: Richard Hawk is a vibrant safety culture specialist. He helps leaders inspire employees to care more about their safety and health so that “nobody gets hurt!” He also has a long history of success getting safety leaders to make safety fun. For more than 35 years, Hawk’s safety keynotes, training sessions, books and “Safety Stuff” ezine have made a huge positive difference in the safety and health field, improving employees’ safety performance. For more information, visit www.makesafetyfun.com.

Safety Device Locks Ladders in Place When Accessing Rooftops

The Ladder Lock Pro allows roofing contractors to lock ladders in place to perform work on the roof. The product attaches directly to the roof itself when a new roof is being installed. The Ladder Lock Pro is made of lightweight aluminum and installs in minutes by attaching the upper ladder step to the rooftop using three screws.

Ladder Lock Pro is designed to increase ladder safety for all roofers, contractors, building inspectors and others who have to access the roof by climbing a ladder. The products can be purchased in angled or flat configurations to accommodate different types of roofs. The device attaches to any upright ladder using a locking pin. Once the locking pin is in place, it can be attached to the roof using three screws.

This product has five separate attachment methods:

  1. Angled 3/12 pitch to 8/12
  2. Flat
  3. Wall (45 degree with drill and Tapcon)
  4. Right gable
  5. Left gable

Properly securing ladders can prevent injuries and save lives. The Ladder Lock Pro was designed by Tim Payton, a professional roofer for more than 30 years who knows the risks that he and his men were presented with every day during roof installations.

For more information, visit www.ladderlockpro.com.

New Hire Fall Protection and Safety Kits

Malta Dynamics, a full-service manufacturing company specializing in fall protection solutions, launches its New Hire Fall Protection and Safety Kits. The New Hire Fall Protection and Safety Kits are designed to simplify the process of outfitting new employees in industries such as roofing and construction. The kits include all safety materials needed in a convenient carry bag so that there is no delay in production.

The New Hire Fall Protection and Safety Kits include the following essentials:

  • Full body harness
  • Short- and long-sleeve high-visibility shirts
  • High-visibility surveyor vest
  • Clear and tinted safety glasses
  • Safety gloves
  • White cap-style hard hat
  • Durable 18″ x 18″ x 10″ bag with handles and detachable, adjustable shoulder strap

According to the company, Malta Dynamics’ equipment is tested to meet safety requirements for OSHA and ANSI and offers workers the tools they need to be visible and work safely at heights. 

For more information, visit https://maltadynamics.com/product/new-hire-fall-protection-and-safety-kits/.

Tethers for Tools and Equipment Comply With ANSI 121-2018 and ISEA Standards

FallTech, a manufacturer specializing in fall protection safety products and gear, introduces its FallTech for Tools dropped object prevention program. Falltech for Tools is a complete ANSI/ISEA 121-2018 tested and compliant range of solutions that feature tool attachments, tool tethers, premium self-fusing no-heat tool tape, speed clip attachment tethers, a wrist anchor attachment system, and hard hat tethers.

FallTech for Tools is designed to accommodate the most commonly used tools in construction trades and other industries. These include tools with captive eyes; open- and closed-handle tools; and open- and closed-handle tools with triggers, including impact hammers, wrenches, screwdrivers, spud wrenches, and power tools. 

“The driving force behind this program is the over 230 fatalities a year as a result of dropped objects and equipment in the U.S. alone, making it the third leading cause of death in the workplace,” said Scott Miller, vice president of sales for FallTech. “That is approximately two fatalities every three days. Our customers trust FallTech products to help them prevent fall injuries.  Now we are introducing quality designed and tested solutions to help prevent injuries as a result of dropped objects while keeping others and their fellow workers safe, as well.”

For more information, visit  http://falltech.com/falltechfortools.aspx.

Dual-Class Self-Retracting Devices Meet Both Class A and Class B Guidelines

Malta Dynamics introduces the Hybrid Hog, the new Dual Class Self-Retracting Lifeline that gives you the advantages of both Class A and Class B retractables, all in one. The Hybrid Hog comes in both a 20′ Dual Class SRL and a 30′ Dual Class SRL.

Self-retracting lifelines (SRLs) are a staple piece of personal fall protection equipment used to keep workers safe when working at heights. SRLs generally come in two versions—Class A and Class B—established by ANSI standard Z359.14-2012. Both types of SRLs limit the maximum peak arresting force to 1,800 pounds as required by OSHA (OSHA 1926.500 subpart M) when worn with a body harness, but the two classes differ on two key dimensions: maximum arrest distanceand average arresting force.

Class A SRLs are defined as devices that provide a maximum arrest distance of 24 inches (610 mm) and an average arresting force not exceeding 1350 pounds (6kN). This class of SRLs is designed to arrest a falling worker very quickly, and is typically used in areas where fall clearance is limited. Think of it like slamming on the brakes in your car when you need to stop immediately—it may be a little jarring, but what matters is stopping before you hit anything.

Class B SRLs are devices that provide a maximum arrest distance of 54 inches (1372 mm) and an average arresting force not exceeding 900 pounds (4kN). This type of SRL also stops a falling worker safely but arrests the fall a bit more gently. Slowing to a stop over a longer distance makes the stop less jarring. This is why you gradually slow to a stop when you’re driving up to an intersection instead of slamming on the brakes—it’s a lot more comfortable if you can afford to slow down gradually.

The new Hybrid Hog from Malta Dynamics combines the advantages of each class into a single device that meets the standards for both classes. The Hybrid Hog offers a maximum arrest distance of just 24 inches to qualify as Class A while alsolimiting the average arresting force to 900 pounds to qualify as Class B. 

For more information, visit www.maltadynamics.com.

Roof Perimeter Safety System Now Features Stainless Steel Adjustable Threaded Parts

FallBan is made in the United States in Jefferson City, Missouri, to meet all your roof fall protection needs. Introduced in 2005 and patented in both the United States and Canada, the FallBan Cableguard System is designed to provide a temporary or permanent safety barrier around the perimeter of the roof. Horizontal steel cables are anchored to the roof and attached to vertical steel stanchions spaced at 20-foot intervals and then tightened to form a barrier to protect anyone on the roof from accidental falls.

According to the company, the addition of stainless steel adjustable threaded parts has made the FallBan Cableguard System better than ever. With just a few simple parts, quickly and easily installed, your roof can be OSHA and/or SOR compliant. Roofing or maintenance on a rooftop, under construction or on an existing structure, installed as a temporary or permanent system, FallBan protects everyone on the roof.

For more information, visit www.fallban.com

New Rescue Harnesses Feature Lightweight Design, Breathable Padding

The Malta Dynamics adds a new line of rescue and retrieval safety harnesses. Featuring a comfortable, lightweight design with breathable padding, the Razorback Elite and Elite MAXX Rescue Harnesses get the job done even when working in confined spaces.

“The built-in rescue handles make this safety harness ideal in situations where you are able to retrieve a down worker,” said David Ivey, Fall Protection Engineer.

According to the company, the Razorback Elite’s lower chest strap is perfect for female workers. Other key features include quick-connect buckles, reflective stitching, a new back D-Ring design and two additional D-Ring attachment points.

“We want to keep you and your workers in the safest and most reliable fall protection systems,” Malta Dynamics President Chris Holland said. “That’s why we never stop innovating.”

The Razorback Elite harnesses are now available in the following lightweight models:

B3001: Razorback Elite Rescue Harness (SML) Weight = 3.8 lbs.

B3002: Razorback Elite Rescue Harness (XL-2XL) Weight = 4 lbs.

B3201: Razorback Elite MAXX Rescue Harness (SML) Weight = 5.5 lbs.

B3202: Razorback Elite MAXX Rescue Harness (XL-2XL) Weight = 5.7 lbs.

This new product launch from Malta Dynamics complements the premium fall protection systems and services offered by the manufacturing company.

For more information, visit www.maltadynamics.com.