Columbia Roofing & Sheet Metal Names New Vice President and General Manager

Columbia Roofing & Sheet Metal has hired Vijay Shankar as Vice President and General Manager. In this role at the Tualatin-based company since the fall of 2017, Shankar brings extensive systems administration and business re-engineering expertise.

Shankar has worked in a variety of industries, including government, manufacturing, wholesale distribution, healthcare and construction. His expertise is in business and financial leadership, financial systems implementation and integration, process development, business re-engineering such as successful turnarounds.

Most recently, Shankar served as a business and financial executive at West Side Electric Co. in Portland. He holds a Master of Business Administration from the University of South Pacific in Fiji.

“I was attracted to Columbia Roofing & Sheet Metal because of its focus on cultivating and maintaining a healthy business culture,” Shankar said.

Columbia Roofing & Sheet Metal’s CEO Mark Carpenter, said he is thrilled to have someone of Shankar’s level of professionalism in such a key role inside his company.

“It’s a privilege to have quality professionals like Vijay join our executive team,” Carpenter said. “Not only is he highly qualified for the VP and GM roles here, but he understands the value of a great company culture. Since he was added to our team, his business processes have enabled us to sustain well managed growth and a very successful year.”

For more information, visit www.reroofnow.com.

Multifaceted Residential Project Puts Contractor to the Test

Photos: Petersen

Diversification has always been a key component of Paul Graham’s business philosophy. Graham is the president of StazOn Roofing Inc., headquartered in Dallas, Texas. The company has been in business 38 years, handling all types of roofing, custom sheet metal fabrication and specialty wall panel systems.

Graham designed his company to be able to tackle multiple scopes of work on complicated projects. “Through time and through practice on all of these jobs, we’ve just been able to step up to the plate and maintain a multi-level task force to handle different types of work on the job,” he says.

The company’s diverse portfolio has been on display at Craig Ranch, a multi-phase residential development in McKinney, Texas. “It’s a high-end multi-family project,” Graham notes. “The most recent phase of the project involved a few five-story and predominately four-story buildings, all wood-framed. There are pools and courtyards with amenity areas for the residents.”

The buildings featured a blend of different roof systems. Crews from StazOn installed 60,000 square feet of shingles on roofs with a 4:12 pitch, 52,000 square feet of TPO on low-slope areas, and 8,500 square feet of standing seam metal roofing on roofs with an 8:12 pitch. They installed 22,000 square feet of standing seam wall panel cladding. The metal roof and wall panels were custom fabricated by StazOn with PAC-CLAD metal from Petersen in two colors, Zinc and Weathered Steel.

The company also fabricated and installed trim, flashing, gutters, collector boxes and rectangular downspouts. “We have our own sheet metal shop, so we can manufacture any type of architectural sheet metal product for our own jobs,” Graham says. “We also provided the builder with a proprietary door pocket at each of the door locations.”

Up on the Roof

The roofing work came first. On the large multi-family buildings, GAF EverGuard 60-mil white TPO was applied on the low-slope sections, which house the mechanical units and serve as a design feature on the project. “These were on the

Craig Ranch is a multi-phase residential community in McKinney, Texas. Condominiums and town homes feature shingles and standing seam metal roofs. The metal wall panels are a distinctive focus of the design. Photos: Petersen

perimeter of the buildings, primarily,” Graham explains. “The architect likes to showcase the walls, so to create that effect, they design a flat roof adjoining the pitched roof sections.”

GAF Timberline Dimensional Shingles in Weathered Wood were installed on the steeper sections of the large multi-family buildings. “These roofs had long, big runs,” Graham notes. “It was kind of like a roofer’s dream if you will, to shingle up there with nothing in the way. It was pretty wide open.”

Metal roofs were installed on a section of town homes. Where the intersecting roof sections formed valleys, crickets were installed to provide adequate drainage. These cricket sections were covered with TPO, and the details where the TPO roof and metal roof came together were crucial. “We terminated the TPO at the sloped roof with a receiver flashing that we heat welded to the TPO,” says Graham. “We take it one step further with that application, so we have a complete watertight transition from the TPO to the bottom of where the metal panel starts.”

The crickets divert water to the exterior, where it drains through the custom-made collector boxes. “The downspouts in those locations are oversized four-by-six downspouts fabricated at our shop from the Petersen material,” Graham notes. “Along with the other sheet metal items, we did the coping, the pre-flashing and flashing, the edge trim, and miscellaneous other vertical and horizontal expansion details.”

On the Walls

After waterproofing inspection of the exterior facade was completed, crews first applied a peel-and-stick building wrap from Grace, Vycor enV-S. “We took field measurements and we custom made all of the trim out of the four-by-eight sheets that Petersen supplied for the job,” Graham explains. “We make all of the trim to fit the windows, doors, penetrations, the steel support beams, which all get pre-flashed and clad.”

The metal roof and wall panels were custom fabricated with 24-gauge aluminum supplied by Petersen. Photos: Petersen

The 16-inch-wide wall panels were fabricated on the site. “We keep the panels protected until the guys are ready to install them,” Graham says. “We have everything we need right there on hand so we can keep up with the needs of the job as it is evolving.”

Panels are installed using a man lift. “From a safety standpoint and a production standpoint, it made sense to use the man lifts,” says Graham. “It’s the most maneuverable way to do the installation. We work in synchronization, moving three or four lifts at a time along the side of these walls as we work our way around the project.”

One unexpected challenge was a section of the leasing office that did not line up perfectly. “The builder came to us and asked if we could build the wall out and make sure all of the wall panels on the facade would be flush once the building was completed,” notes Graham. “We made some custom 16-gauge steel hat channels and Z-members and installed them as structural members to the wall. Then we installed the panels over the steel framing, so that we would have that same elevation and same build-out across the front of the building.”

Coordinated Attack

Phase III of the project was just completed, and Phase IV is now underway. Graham points to a few keys to navigating complicated projects like these. “It usually is a tight schedule, so coordinating with the builder to keep everything on schedule is the key,” says Graham. “You have to fabricate the necessary components and deliver them to the job in a timely fashion to keep the crews on target.”

Crews from StazOn Roofing installed the roof systems and wall panels, as well as custom-made trim, flashing, gutters, and downspouts. Photos: Petersen

Maintaining the consistency and quality of the details is also important, and experience helps. “We know what works best for the long haul,” he says. “At the end of the day, you want those details to line up with what the architect had as his vision, but we will make recommendations if we think there is a better way to construct a detail for specific conditions.”

The wall panels on this project were a top priority. “The specialty wall panel systems are so architecturally significant,” he says. “We kind of live and breathe them. We understand them. We’ve come across many, many challenges along the way on other jobs, so when we run into a new challenge, we just roll up our sleeves, get it figured out, design it with all of the people involved, and get going with it.”

Graham credits the Dallas-based builder and the Dallas-based architecture firm, JHP, for spearheading the successful project. “It’s nice when you have a team you’ve worked with and everyone understands what needs to be done to satisfy the client’s desires,” he says.

TEAM

Architect: JHP, Dallas, Texas, www.jhparch.com
Roofing Contractor: StazOn Roofing Inc., Dallas, Texas, www.stazonroof.com

MATERIALS

TPO: EverGuard 60-mil white TPO, GAF, www.GAF.com
Asphalt Laminate Shingles: Timberline Dimensional Shingle in Weathered Wood, GAF
Metal Roof and Wall Panels: PAC-CLAD 24-gauge aluminum in Zinc and Weathered Steel, Petersen, www.Pac-Clad.com
Building Wrap: Vycor enV-S, Grace, www.gcpat.com

Orlando Airport Project Necessitates Custom Fabrication, Precise Installation

 

Work on the first phase of the Orlando International Airport expansion project includes the South Airport Intermodal Terminal Facility and APM Complex, which features a standing seam metal roof

Architectural Sheet Metal Inc. has been in servicing the Orlando area for more than 23 years, specializing in commercial metal roofs and wall systems, primarily new construction. When Matthew Leonard, the company’s vice president, found out that the Orlando International Airport was proposing a new terminal project with a metal roof, he jumped at the chance to submit a bid.

He wanted to land the job because it would be the largest project the company has ever tackled, and one of its most prominent. He also wanted it for another reason—he knew he’d see it every time he drove to the airport. “For many years now, we’ve specialized in standing seam metal roofs. It’s our bread and butter,” he says. “We’ve done lots of schools, government building, military bases. It’s just something we enjoy doing. When this project came around, right here in our backyard, we knew we wanted to take it on. It’s larger than anything we’ve ever done, but it’s our specialty.”

The South Airport Intermodal Terminal Facility and APM Complex is a new construction project that coordinates mass transit for the airport, including regional rail systems and the Automated People Mover (APM). It’s part of the first phase of an ambitious $2 billion plan to almost double the size of the airport.

Architectural Sheet Metal installed the Berridge standing seam metal roof system, as well as internal aluminum gutters and a custom-fabricated aluminum bullnose that runs along the perimeter of the roof

The building encompasses approximately 200,000 square feet, and the structure is primarily covered with a standing seam metal roof. The scope of work for Architectural Sheet Metal included installing the metal roof system and internal aluminum gutters. It also included custom fabrication and installation of an aluminum bullnose that runs along the perimeter of the roof. “Every roof is radiused, and some sections have compound double raiduses,” Leonard notes. “The trickiest part of the project is probably the bullnose because all of the gable ends of the roof are radiused, and the large bullnose has to be welded on in 30-foot sections.”

Another tricky thing about the project is that the work was divided into two different contracts with two different construction managers. On one side of the building, which houses the monorail and parking garage, the project is overseen by Hensel Phelps, and on the other side, which handles the train lines, the construction is overseen by a Turner-Kiewit joint venture. The dividing point is a building expansion joint that runs across the middle of the roof. “We’re one of very few subcontractors out here that has a contract with both of the construction managers,” Leonard says. “They both have their own agendas, their own timelines, and their own completion dates, and it was a delicate balancing act working with the two of them.”

Installing the Roof

The roof system was designed to unify the elements of the structure and tie the building together. Some sections of the roof cover the building, while others serve as canopies, so there are two types of metal deck on the building. “The area we call the spine has a 3-inch-thick acoustical deck,” Leonard explains. “That was interesting because before we could put our 6 inches of polyiso on, we had to install batten insulation in the flutes. The acoustical decking is perforated, so you can see through it. That’s a little different, when you’re so high up. It spooked the guys at first to be able to see right through it.”

Crews dried in the entire roof with a waterproofing underlayment from MFM Building Products specifically designed for high-temperature applications.

The other sections were comprised of standard type B metal deck. Sections covering the interior were insulated, while canopy sections were covered with 5/8-inch DensDeck from Georgia-Pacific.

Crews from Architectural Sheet Metal dried in the entire roof with a peel-and-stick waterproofing underlayment from MFM Building Products specifically designed for high-temperature applications, MFM Ultra-HT. “It’s easy to install,” notes Leonard. “That’s our go-to underlayment for metal projects.”

After the underlayment was applied, the welded aluminum gutters were installed. “The longest piece was 78 feet,” says Leonard. “We fabricated the sections, water-tested them and shipped them out. We used a crane to lift them to the roof.”

The roof system was supplied by Berridge Manufacturing, and the 24-gauge galvalume metal panels were roll formed at the site. “Berridge has a ZEE-Lock double-lock standing seam panel,” Leonard says. “We own one of their portable roll formers, and we have it on site here. We pick it up with a crane, and lift it up to the edge of the roof, and we actually roll form our largest panels straight out to the roof. The guys just catch the panels as they come out of the roll former.”

Metal roof panels were roll formed at the site. For most roof sections, the roll former was hoisted by a crane, to the edge of the roof, and crew members stacked the panels as they come out of the roll former.

Panels were stacked in piles of 10 for installation. There were 12 different roof surfaces, so as the roll forming crew moved along, other crews would start installing the panels. “Every stack was tied down with strapping to ensure that it wasn’t susceptible to wind,” Leonard points out. “With a hurricane in the forecast, we were very careful about that.”

The panels in the spine area had a tighter radius, so those panels were formed on the ground using separate curving machine. Lining up the panels perfectly was critical. “With a radiused roof, it’s sometimes harder to find things to measure off to ensure your panels are straight. This panel is a left-to-right system. It’s a male-female overlay with a continuous clip that Berridge manufactures. The panels are hand-crimped together, and then you do the first and second stage of the double-lock panels with an electric seamer. You just turn it on and it goes up and over.”

Details, Details

Fall protection posts were installed during the framing process, which helped with safety planning but posed problems when it came to detailing. “It’s nice to have permanent fall protection points to tie into, as everyone had to be 100 percent tied off, but there are close to 200 fall protection posts on the project that we had to cut around and flash,” Leonard says. “I’ve never seen so many posts on a roof like that.”

The aluminum bullnose was constructed after precise measurements were taken at the site. After they were custom painted to match the roof, the 30-foot sections were lifted into place and installed.

Because the posts were tied into the structural steel and couldn’t be moved, the company designed and manufactured a welded aluminum flashing detail to ensure they all looked the same no matter where they landed in the panel profile. “We set up a welded aluminum flashing that should last forever, and it’s welded, so it shouldn’t leak. We try to go above and beyond in our flashing details.”

Leonard points to his company’s fabrication experience as a key to its strength. “We try to be more than just a roofing company,” he says. “We try to be a custom metal fabrication company that fabricates the panels to precise specifications determined by the site. We custom fabricate metal and then, as roofers, we install it. We like to have that double whammy. Not many people have that ability to do both.”

The company’s expertise came in handy on the bullnose. “The bullnose was originally bid as 22-gauge metal,” he says. “We looked at it and we didn’t like it. It’s a large, 9-inch radius, and we felt the thin, light-gauge metal would shake in the wind. Every 10 feet would be a lap joint with caulk, which would be susceptible to wind damage. We came up with the idea of using a welded piece of .080 aluminum. Once it was approved, we purchased a 100-ton press brake with a custom die to fabricate this bullnose.”

The bullnose was constructed from precise measurements taken at the site. “We took the radius off of the building and created jigs in our warehouse,” Leonard explains. “We welded pieces together in 30-foot sections, and we shipped them to a local painter who coated them with baked-on Kynar to match the roof.”

The bullnose was designed to hook into the gutter strap and wrap around onto the fascia, where it is screwed into the framing. In areas where there is no gutter, sections of the bullnose are equipped with a larger flange with an S-hook built into it to attach it to the roof. Corner pieces tie it all together.

Watching Out for Irma

Dealing with two different GCs was challenging, in part due to changes in the schedule. “Originally, we were supposed to finish one side first and then start the other side, but both phases of the project ended up starting around the same time,” says Leonard. “This doubled the manpower we needed on the job.”

Photos: Aerial Innovations

For changes like the bullnose, Architectural Sheet Metal had to make sure RFIs were submitted and approved by both sides. “Sometimes it was hard to keep track of who we submitted it to, but it worked to our benefit at times. Once it was approved by one side, it was easily approved by the other.”

The schedule had the crews working in hurricane season, and precautions were taken to make sure the job site was prepared for high winds. “When Hurricane Irma was approaching, I checked every single weather update every day until it made landfall,” Leonard recalls. “It hit on a Monday, and a full week ahead of that we were cleaning the roofs and preparing the gutters. We removed all debris on the jobsite because any trash on the roof could clog the downspouts. We added more and more men to the process throughout the week, and we shut the jobsite down on Wednesday. We took all of the material we had, stacked it, bundled it together, and we were able to move it all inside the building. We were pretty well complete on the Hensel-Phelps side, and Turner Kiewit brought in 40-foot Conex boxes for us to put our material in and secure it. They tried really hard to make sure the jobsite was secure.”

As the storm progressed, it deviated from the projected path, and no one could be certain which direction the winds might be coming from. “We just had to start battening everything down,” Leonard recalls.

Photos: Architectural Sheet Metal Inc.

Stacks of panels on the roof that were not yet installed were strapped every 2 feet on center. The entire state was in emergency mode, making things difficult. “For four or five days before the storm even hit, we couldn’t find water, rope and extension cords. Grocery stores were running out of supplies. Gas stations were running out of gas.”

After the storm passed, Leonard breathed a sigh of relief. The roof wasn’t damaged. The panels that had already been installed were in great shape, and the uninstalled panels weren’t harmed.

Elements like the weather are beyond anyone’s control, and Leonard notes his company tries to control as many variables as it can. “We have full control over the actual fabrication of the material and the quality of it,” he says. “When I call something in, I talk to our guy who works with me. Our company oversees it. Every morning I stop by the shop and follow up on the process on the way to the job site. We install it. I can make sure everything is OK.”

The project is nearing completion, and Leonard can’t wait to finish a landmark project he’ll see every time he makes a trip to the airport. “You can’t miss it,” he says. “It’s huge.”

TEAM

Architect: HKS Architects, Orlando, Florida, HKSinc.com
General Contractors: Hensel Phelps, Greeley, Colorado, HenselPhelps.com; and a joint venture between Turner Construction, Orlando, Florida, Turnerconstruction.com, and Kiewit, Sunrise, Florida, Kiewit.com
Metal Roofing Contractor: Architectural Sheet Metal Inc., Orlando, Florida, ASMfl.com

MATERIALS

Standing Seam Metal Roof: Berridge Zee-Lock Double-Lock, Zinc-Cote, Berridge Manufacturing, Berridge.com
Underlayment: MFM Ultra-HT Wind & Water Seal, MFM Building Products, MFMbp.com
Cover Board: DensDeck, Georgia-Pacific, Buildgp.com

Silicone Sealant Repairs Roofs, Masonry and Sheet Metal

The 100 percent Silicone Sealant seals and repairs roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners.

The 100 percent Silicone Sealant seals and repairs roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners.

Mule-Hide Products Co. has added 100 percent Silicone Sealant choices to its Silicone Roof Coating System, expanding the color offering to include clear and the packaging options to include 10-ounce tubes.
 
100 percent Silicone Sealant is a mastic version of the Mule-Hide 100 percent Silicone Roof Coating. It is a moisture-cure silicone sealant designed for use in sealing and repairing roofs, masonry, architectural sheet metal, and metal roof seams and fasteners. 
 
The addition of clear sealant allows contractors to complete projects that would otherwise require color-matching. It is available packaged in tubes only.

In addition to clear, the tubes are available filled with white sealant. The plastic cartridges are an option for use in smaller applications or when precision is required. They also can be submerged under water to repair roof leaks, gutters and downspouts.
 
100 percent Silicone Sealant provides adhesion to concrete, masonry, polyurethane foam, EPDM membranes, TPO membranes, aged PVC membranes, aged acrylic coatings, granular cap sheets, wood, metals, Kynar finishes and most other building materials. When using 100 percent Silicone Sealant with a TPO roof membrane, Mule-Hide Si TPO Primer must be applied first. 
 
The sealant has minimal odor, making it contractor- and building-occupant-friendly. Its volatile organic compound (VOC) content of less than 10 grams per liter makes it acceptable for use in areas with VOC restrictions. It does not corrode metals.
 

Project Profiles: Historic Preservation

CATHEDRAL OF ST. PAUL, BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

Team

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: Midland Engineering Co., South
Bend, Ind.
ARCHITECT: ArchitectureWorks LLP, Birmingham
GENERAL CONTRACTOR: Hoar Construction LLC, Birmingham,
MASONRY CONTRACTOR: Ziolkowski Construction Inc., South Bend

The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles.

The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles.

Roof Materials

The Catholic Archdiocese of Birmingham required the cathedral’s new roof system be a historically accurate reproduction of the original in materials, design and craftsmanship. The cathedral’s intricate slate tile patterns incorporated three slate colors and square and deep bevel cut tiles. Six large slate crosses and multiple accent patterns, barely visible on the faded original roof, required exacting measurements prior to tear-off and a high level of precision to recreate and maintain over such a large field and on octagonal steeples.

Because of metal thinning brought on by their advanced age, every copper architectural and functional feature in the existing roof system had to be carefully removed and shipped to Midland Engineering’s South Bend facility to be historically replicated in its metal shop. This included seven ornate crosses (up to 17-feet tall), finials, turret caps and more. There were more than four dozen components, for which no original prints existed, as well as over 500 feet each of custom copper cornices and radius gutters with matching straps. More than 20,000 square feet of 16- and 20-ounce copper was utilized for fabrication of architectural elements and flashing.

Midland Engineering was asked to make improvements to the original roof system to improve attic ventilation while maintaining the Gothic Revival period look. To accomplish this, the crew integrated bronze screen (invisible from the ground) into the original copper cornice and eave design to provide improved cold air intake while new louvered copper dormers replaced the original painted roof ventilator.

An updated lightning protection system was incorporated into the new roof design, hidden within many of the new copper crosses and other architectural elements. The system was fabricated in Midland Engineering’s shop to maintain the Gothic Revival look.

The metal shop also clad 10 previously painted windows and mullions in copper, effectively eliminating frequent and costly maintenance. These windows, reachable only by crane at considerable expense, formerly required painting and other maintenance every five to seven years.

About 6,500 square feet of lead-coated copper, which patinas to a limestone color, was utilized to cap all limestone exposed to weather, reducing ongoing maintenance of limestone joints.

Extensive termite damage to structural framing required repair prior to installation of the new roofing system. Upon removal of the original slate roof and completion of the structural repairs, the new roof was dried-in and installation of the new slate roof began. The historically accurate replacements of the original copper architectural features were installed according to schedule.

SLATE SUPPLIER: North Country Slate
COPPER SUPPLIER: Hussey Copper

Roof Report

The Cathedral of St. Paul is the centerpiece of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Birmingham. Completed in 1893 at a cost of $90,000, the cathedral is widely considered to be a handsome example of the American Neo-Gothic variant of the Gothic Revival style. The cathedral measures 96-feet wide by 140-feet long and encompasses more than 60,000 square feet. It features twin octagonal steeples, rising 183-feet high.

Work schedules on this project were a challenge. The contract required parishioner and clergy access to the church must be maintained 24 hours a day, seven days a week, throughout the eight-month duration of the project. Further, because of the noise inherent in roof construction, work schedules had to be planned around regular church services and events and rescheduled several times a month for funerals and other unscheduled events.

“We could not have been more pleased with the work accomplished by the team from Midland Engineering,” says Very Rev. Kevin M. Bazzel, V.G., J.C.L., rector of the Cathedral of St. Paul. “It is a marvel to us to be able to see the church in its original glory, and all of this thanks to Midland!”

The National Roofing Contractors Association, Rosemont, Ill., awarded Midland Engineering the prestigious Gold Circle Award in 2016. Midland was recognized in the Outstanding Workmanship—Steep-slope Category.

Photo: Rob Culpepper

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Wrench-Free Nibbler Delivers Burr-Free Cuts of Sheet Metal

The wrench-free nibbler features a rotating head for operation.

The wrench-free nibbler features a rotating head for operation.

Kett Tool Company has introduced the KL-2020 14-Gauge Nibbler, wrench-free nibbler featuring a rotating head for operation. The KL-2020 boasts a die design that allows for maneuverability in cutting sheet metal.
 
Metal fabricators, auto manufacturers and construction crews will appreciate the KL-2020 nibbler that can be locked into four different positions (in 90-degree increments). A rotation of the hand changes the angle of the die while the free-floating punch design extends time between replacements.
 
The KL-2020 cuts 14-gauge cold rolled (C.R.) mild steel and most grades of stainless to 16-gauge. At just 10.5 inches and four pounds, this four-amp, 2500 RPM straight handle electric nibbler is easy to handle and store at any job site. It delivers a clean burr-free cut of flat and corrugated sheet metal up to 65 inches per minute.
 
The KL-2020 Nibbler is available through authorized dealers. For more information or to locate a dealer, users can visit Kett Tool or call (513)271-0333.

N.B. Handy Becomes Stocking Provider of Roofinox Line of Stainless Metal Roofing Materials

Dave Rowe, vice president of Roofinox America of Eatontown, N.J., has announced that N.B. Handy, the Lynchburg, Va., based supplier of metals, metal fabricating machinery, and sheet metal for the roofing and HVAC trades, has become a stocking provider of the Roofinox line of stainless steel and tin-plated (Terne) stainless metal roofing materials.

Dave Rowe notes: “We are pleased to welcome the N.B. Handy Co. to our distribution network. This arrangement gives N.B. Handy a proven stainless steel roofing product it can confidently offer to customers, knowing it will be embraced for its durability, corrosion resistance and visual appeal.” It also provides N.B. Handy with a product “for its architectural network that is quite malleable and easy to rollform—something specifically absent from the marketplace since Follansbee closed its doors and cut off the supply of TCS II to the American market,” says Rowe. He adds that, “architects will be particularly happy with its availability for restoration and historic projects.”

With the new arrangement, N.B. Handy will offer its customers the capability to produce structural roofing profiles with premier stainless steel and tin plated (Terne) stainless steel roofing materials. Tony Bonavito, vice president of Procurement and Supplier Management at N.B. Handy notes, “We are excited about this development because providing the Roofinox stainless materials allows us to offer a full line of products and finishes to our customers.”

CIDAN Machinery Joins the Metal Construction Association

The Metal Construction Association (MCA) welcomes CIDAN Machinery to its membership roster. The company has joined the association’s ranks of about 75 member companies with specialties in the metal construction industry.

CIDAN Machinery has manufactured machines since 1907 and is a well-established company within the sheet metal industry. The company manufactures and markets the brands CIDAN and Göteneds at its factory in Götene, Sweden.

“CIDAN Machinery is excited to participate in networking and stay current with the metal construction industry,” says Larry Chandonnet, CIDAN’s president.

MCA member companies benefit from participation in association activities that focus on research, codes and standards, market development, and technical programs. The association works to increase the use of metal materials in construction by educating the building and design communities about the benefits of metal.

MCA members represent a broad scope of companies including metal roof, wall panel, shingles and coatings manufacturers, coil coaters and metal producers, distributors, equipment and accessories manufacturers, energy insulation system manufacturers, and MCM fabricators. Membership information kits for each industry segment are available on MCA’s website.

RCMA Began Speakers Bureau with Presentation for CRSMCA District Meeting

The Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association (RCMA) kicked off its Speakers Bureau program with a presentation by Joseph Sorrentino, Uniflex/Sherwin Williams, for the Carolinas Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors Association’s (CRSMCA) district meeting. The CRSMCA district meeting took place in Concord, N.C., at the Embassy Suites Charlotte-Concord. RCMA’s Reflective Roof Coatings: Cool Stories presentation helped CRSMCA to hone its meeting focus on the key benefits and environmental importance of reflective roof coatings used on low-slope roof systems.

“Presenting for CRSMCA brought back fond memories, as I began my roofing career with CRSMCA in 1977,” says Sorrentino. “This was a great opportunity to educate an audience of roofing contractors, distributors and manufacturing representatives on the benefits of reflective roof coatings.”

RCMA is an approved continuing education provider with the American Institute of Architects (AIA), RCI Inc. and the U.S. Green Building Council (GBCI). By attending RCMA’s Reflective Roof Coatings: Cool Stories course, attendees qualify to earn 1 AIA General Learning Unit hour (1 LU hour) as part of AIA’s continuing education system, 1 RCI continuing education hour (CEH), or 1 GBCI continuing education hour (1 GBCI CE hour).

N.B. Handy Showcases Sheet Metal Machinery During ‘Spring Fling 2014’

The N.B. Handy Company held its “Spring Fling 2014” Machinery Show on April 28-30 in Lynchburg, Va. Top roofing vendors brought their machines and worked with Paul Seufer, general manager at N.B. Handy, to showcase profitability through productivity.

The “Spring Fling” is the largest architectural sheet metal show under one roof in the Mid Atlantic Region. Attendees saw live demonstrations of the full suite of machinery products, including Quadro pan former, Lockformer CNC plasma cutter, Norlok metal fastening machine, Flagler Offset Snaplock machine and an ironworker to manufacture gutter brackets and punch holes.

Participating vendors were excited to travel from all over the country to meet with N.B. Handy customers and engage and share in the concepts and technologies being highlighted. The crowd saw lots of machines, asked questions and observed demonstrations with their own spec parts. Several customers took advantage of show specials to help them get the best machines into their shops now, at the beginning of the construction season.

Seufer took the opportunity of having the show serve a dual purpose; he held a roofing hands-on training session for the N.B. Handy roofing staff members and the employees at their subsidiary company, Morris Ginsberg. To qualify for participation, each person had to pass a pre-test to prove they were prepared to build a roof. The group worked as a cohesive crew to build a mock-up of a roof, incorporating ANSI and SPRI National Standards. This invaluable exercise showed the team what their contractors do on a daily basis.

“The Spring Fling was a place for everyone to bring their curiosity about the roofing industry and see for themselves, through a working exhibition, the incredible array of machines available today that keep us productive and profitable,” Seufer says.

N.B. Handy, headquartered in Lynchburg, Va., has 14 strategically located, full-service sales and distribution facilities in Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia.

During the Spring Fling, a hands-on training session took place for the N.B. Handy roofing staff and the employees of N.B. Handy's subsidiary company Morris Ginsberg

During the Spring Fling, a hands-on training session took place for the N.B. Handy roofing staff and the employees of N.B. Handy’s subsidiary company Morris Ginsberg.