Shingles Feature Mechanically Fused Common Bond, Larger Nailing Area

GAF launches Timberline HDZ shingles, powered by new and innovative LayerLock technology. According to the manufacturer, LayerLock technology mechanically fuses the common bond in Timberline HDZ shingles to offer: 

  • Up to 99.9 percent nailing accuracy thanks to the new StrikeZone nailing area, which is up to 600 percent larger vs. Timberline HD shingles
  • Up to 30 percent faster nail fastening during installation vs. Timberline HD shingles 
  • Dual-phase shingle-to-shingle seal with Dura Grip sealant and StrikeZone nailing area, and an asphalt-to-asphalt monolithic bond for durability, strength and powerful wind uplift performance 
  • Compatibility with Timberline HD roofing shingles

 “Roofing contractors have been asking for new ways to help accelerate and grow their business, and we’re excited to introduce technology that can make their jobs faster and easier with Timberline HDZ shingles,” said Jim Schnepper, President of GAF. “This represents some of the most exciting innovation in the roofing industry today, backed by the quality and reliability homeowners have trusted for more than 130 years with GAF.” 

Roofing contractors can now also offer homeowners a GAF WindProven limited wind warranty, the first wind warranty for roofing shingles with no maximum wind speed limit, when installing GAF shingles with LayerLock technology and four qualifying GAF accessories. For information on qualifying GAF roofing accessories, please visit www.gaf.com/LRS

GAF Timberline HDZ shingles will be on display for a national audience for the first time at the 2020 International Roofing Expo from February 4-6 in Dallas, Texas. Conference attendees can visit GAF at booth 4404 and the neighboring GAF CARE Corner for live demonstrations, or go online at www.gaf.com/layerlock to learn more. 

For more information, visit www.gaf.com

Shingles With Proprietary Blend of SBS Offer Enhanced Durability

Owens Corning Roofing introduces TruDefinition Duration FLEX Shingles. Made with a proprietary blend of SBS polymer modified asphalt, Duration FLEX shingles are engineered to deliver pliability and increased flexibility compared to standard shingles, while offering advanced performance in harsh weather conditions. The shingles offer the highest impact rating available: UL 2218 Class 4.

Featuring Sure NailTechnology, TruDefiniton Duration FLEX Shingles provide a high level of performance. For example, compared to standard shingles, Duration FLEXShingles offer 42 percent better nail pull-resistance against wind. In addition, built-in flexibility helps the shingles resist cracks and tears in all-weather installation conditions – offering more than 10 percent stronger tear strength compared to traditional shingles.

Duration FLEX shingles are also manufactured for efficient installation and are formulated to lay flat more quickly than standard shingles for a clean, finished look. The rubber-like flexibility that helps the shingle withstand expansion and contraction stresses, also helps minimize loss of granules and protect the shingle against UV.

“Extreme weather events can put your roof to the test,” said Scott Schumacher, Director of Marketing. “As ourmost advanced Duration shingle, Duration FLEX Shinglesprovidecontractors and homeowners with a premium architectural asphalt shingle that offers performance, durability and impressive resistance to help protect their home.” 

Duration FLEX Shingles are available in seven colors.

For more information, please visit https://www.owenscorning.com/roofing.

New Architectural Shingles Feature Impact Resistance, Reinforced Nail Zone

IKO introduces the new Nordic performance shingle line. Available in nine high-definition colors for maximum curb appeal, these heavy-duty laminated performance architectural shingles are specially constructed with a unique combination of superior wind- and impact-resistant features, making them one of the top performing asphalt shingles on the market.

According to the manufacturer, Nordic derives its impact resistance from a coating of polymer-modified asphalt, which acts as a shock absorber to cushion the roof from impacts from hail. This superior protection against wind uplift and water penetration qualifies the shingle for a Class 4 impact resistance rating.

“An extension of our ArmourZone performance platform, Nordic shingles not only feature the rare combination of a reinforced nail zone and impact resistance, but they also achieve a high-definition appearance through IKO’s color-blending technology,” said Mark Okland, product development manager, North America. “Now, customers can have the high-end look they desire with the performance features they need to keep their homes safe.”

IKO Nordic shingles feature IKO’s innovative ArmourZone 1-1/4-inch-wide, reinforced nailing surface. Nails applied in this area are optimally positioned to help resist nail pull-through and shingle blow-off. According to the company, shingles with the ArmourZone have been designed to help resist winds of up to 130 mph. The Nordic shingle construction also includes Fastlock sealant strips, formulated to be thick and aggressive while creating a strong bond to the shingles below. This helps ensure maximum protection against wind uplift, blow-off and water penetration. Available in nine high-definition colors, Nordic shingles combine the same advanced color-blending technology used for IKO’s Dynasty performance product line, with deep shadow bands for added dimension and the high-end look and visual texture of genuine wood shakes or slate tiles.

For more information, visit www.iko.com.

Safety Tips and Best Practices for Roofing in Frosty Temperatures

Installing a roof in cold weather is nothing to sneeze at. While roofing contractors in the deep South may not have to worry about business slowing down in the winter, the majority of contractors must contend with cold temperatures, snow, ice and sleet. And even when these extreme weather conditions allow work to be done, they can still create many product and safety issues on the job. 

No matter how well you’ve honed your craft, roofing in cold weather is a challenge for any seasoned contractor. In addition to thinking about the safety of your workers, you must also consider the usability of supplies and equipment, which may be susceptible to the elements. 

For instance, in lower temperatures, certain types of asphalt shingles can become less flexible and equipment may freeze. Also, you should ask yourself: Can I keep my workers motivated and focused on the quality I expect? When roofers are uncomfortable or can’t work safely, they begin to worry about themselves more than the work they’re doing — and justifiably so. 

Before proceeding with your next cold-weather roofing job, consider the following precautions and recommendations. 

Product Considerations

The first rule of cold-weather roofing is to follow all manufacturers’ cold-weather installation guidelines. Different manufacturers specify different minimum temperatures for their products. If the temperature is below that minimum, you will need to take extra precautions to ensure the roof shingles are handled correctly and the product seals properly. 

For example, while asphalt shingles have been successfully used in cold climates for more than a century, they become less flexible at temperatures below 40 degrees Fahrenheit. 

When asphalt shingles lose their pliability, they become prone to cracking and other problems, including failing to lie flat and not holding their shape, which can result in granule loss, humping and other damage. Lower temperatures will also keep the shingle sealant lines from achieving proper thermal activation. 

Because of the increased risk of shingle damage and the shingle not sealing correctly in cold temperatures, workers should keep the following things in mind:

  • Never throw or drop shingles. 
  • Give shingles time to warm up before installation if they have been stored in freezing temperatures. Cold shingles — especially fiberglass shingles — may crack on the back when nailed to the deck, which can cause roof leaks. Best practice: When installing shingles in low temperatures, nail them by hand to avoid the “blow through” that a high-powered nail gun can cause.

Remember that most sealants won’t thermally activate at temperatures below 40 degrees. Instead, seal strips must be hand sealed with an approved asphalt roofing cement or other manufacturer-approved adhesive. 

The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) recommends that shingles be pressed into the asphalt cement so that the adhesive reaches almost to the shingle edges, but is not exposed. For laminated shingles, ARMA says at least three spots of sealant may be used. If not sealed properly, eaves and rakes can be extremely susceptible to wind blow-off. 

The association also suggests the use of open metal valleys in cold weather because installing closed and woven valleys require shingles to be bent, which could result in damage. 

To prevent ice dams — the frozen water that can build up at the eaves of a roof — be sure to install proper roof and attic ventilation in addition to a premium ice and water roof underlayment, which provides a second layer of protection in cold-weather conditions. Ice and water underlayment can be used along eaves, valleys, flashings, hips, ridges, dormers, rakes, skylights and chimneys. Properly ventilating a roof will help ensure maximum protection against ice dams.

Before installing roofing underlayment, be sure that the deck is completely dry so the moisture doesn’t cause wrinkling or buckling of the underlayment. This wrinkling can telegraph through the shingles, creating cosmetic and performance concerns. In addition, trapped moisture can contribute to shingle blistering. 

Overall, when roofing during cold-weather months, check the forecast and plan for potential delays. Better yet, try to work on bright, clear days, when the sun can bear some of the burden and help warm up the roof deck. 

Safety Concerns

Near-freezing temperatures not only create issues with supplies, they can also pose safety risks to workers.

To avoid frostbite, roofers should layer up in clothing such as ClimaWarm and Hyperwarm, which provide warmth, breathability and protection from wintery weather. Even with the proper attire, workers should beware of the signs and symptoms of frostbite, which include prickling skin, numbness and — worst of all — clumsiness caused by stiff joints and muscles. 

In addition to following the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA’s) safety regulations for harnesses and fall-protection systems, roofers should always wear shoes with good traction — but especially in cold weather, when surfaces can become slippery. 

Also, encourage everyone to take regular warm-up breaks throughout the day, limit work schedules during extreme weather conditions and consider investing in on-site heating equipment, such as portable foot warmers.

To best prepare yourself and your crew for winter jobs:

  • Plan work around the shorter daylight hours, as well as weather conditions that may prevent roofers from safely being able to put in the necessary hours. 
  • Expect work performance to slow down due to dexterity issues and other natural body-responsive reactions caused by cold temperatures. 
  • Anticipate the extra time that will be required to clear snow from roofs and protect the surface from the elements while work is being performed. 
  • Remember that even a thin layer of snow can camouflage skylights, other materials and debris, which could pose a tripping or falling hazard. 
  • Because working in cold weather takes just as much, if not more, physical exertion as working in warm weather, roofers should be sure to drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration. 

Ultimately, the best advice is to be prepared. Take a cold hard look at the weather forecast and plan accordingly, taking into consideration worker safety, product usability and equipment functionality. Being flexible and ready to adjust work as needed can keep winter business from freezing up altogether.

About the author: Paul Casseri is the product manager of the Roofing Shingles and Underlayment Division for Atlas Roofing Corporation. For more information, visit www.atlasroofing.com.

TAMKO Donates Roof to Surprise Single Mother with Failing Roof

TAMKO shingles now cover what was gaping holes and the exposed roof deck of Phoenix single mother Rachel’s home only a few weeks ago. Rachel was the beneficiary of a new TAMKO roof and other home repairs during a Phoenix-area 3TV news feature called Arizona’s Family Surprise Squad.

Rachel had just found out she was pregnant with her second child when her fiancé was killed by a drunk driver in 2015. Recent storms tore a hole in her roof and water started leaking into her home, causing further damage. She was nominated for the Surprise Squad by her mother.

The repairs to Rachel’s home were made possible through donations of product and labor from members of the Arizona Roofing Contractors Association’s Young Professionals group, including TAMKO Building Products, Inc. who provided shingles for the roof.

“This story touched all our hearts,” said TAMKO President and CEO David Humphreys. “We’re so glad that we were able to play a part in helping ease the burden from this young mother’s shoulders. And we feel proud to be a part of a group like the Arizona Roofing Contractors Association that is always looking to make a difference in their communities.”

The ARCA Young Professionals group has been involved in several charitable projects in recent years, but the group’s leadership knew there was something special about this situation as soon as they heard Rachel’s story.

Eric Perry, COO of Azul Roofing Solutions and member of the ARCA Young Professionals, said, “The response was overwhelming with people willing to step up and help. I couldn’t be happier with the way it came together. Any time we have the ability to use our skills in this trade to help someone, especially so deserving, like Rachel, it’s a no-brainer. Her response made it all the better too. It just made us want to do more and more for her.”

Some of the other ARCA Young Professionals members involved in the repair project include employees from Lifetime Roofing Systems, Tecta America, Star Roofing, Elite Roofing Supply and Wrecorp.

For more information, visit www.TAMKO.com.

Smog-Reducing Granules Harness the Power of the Sun to Improve Air Quality

The 3M Industrial Mineral Products Division recently launched 3M Smog-Reducing Granules to help remove smog pollution (nitrogen oxides or NOx) using roofing shingles. Integrated throughout a shingle’s surface, 3M’s roofing granules are designed with a specialized photocatalytic coating applied to the base mineral. The specialized coating on the granule is activated by the sun’s UV rays, while blending inconspicuously into various shingle color combinations. As sunlight hits the shingles containing the smog-reducing granules, radicals are generated and transform nitrogen oxide gases into water-soluble ions, improving air quality. According to the company, this smart solution for pollution mitigation can help communities contribute toward their NOx emission reduction efforts.

“3M is leading the way with roofing technology solutions for improving environmental impacts on human health and welfare,” said Frank Klink, senior laboratory manager, 3M. “The roofing granules are a first for residential asphalt shingles. The new 3M granules will help roofing manufacturers develop high quality, aesthetically-pleasing shingles that can turn any roof into an active smog reducing catalyst, essentially becoming smog’s worst enemy.”

To prove out the technology, 3M submitted granule and shingle samples to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for evaluation. Performance testing occurred using challenge gasses in a reaction chamber. Downstream of the system, NOx concentrations were recorded in real time, prior to, during, and after UV illumination. According to the company, the testing validated the efficacy of 3M’s photocatalytic materials in reducing smog and contributing towards air purification.

For more information, visit www.3M.com.

New Color Palette Available for High-Definition Shingles

Atlas Roofing Corporation launches its new Pinnacle Pristine Natural Expressions high-definition color palette.

Natural Expressions’ exhilarating hues are created through a proprietary manufacturing process in which drops of different colors are strategically added to the dragon’s tooth and shim — the parts of the shingle that give it depth and character.

Pinnacle Pristine shingles featuring the Natural Expressions palette pull from rich, color-reserve blends and are available in five bold, designer shades:

  • Coastal Granite – Imagine standing on the windswept coast of Maine and feeling a little thrill to see how the color of the rocks almost matches the pounding seas. This deep gray shingle is anything but neutral.
  • Copper Canyon – Drawn to wide-open spaces and big, dramatic vistas? Looking like they came directly from the rugged landscapes of the Old West, these shingles can’t help but inspire a sense of adventure.
  • Majestic Shake – Know how historic trees have a certain dignity about
 them? Some homes do too. Offering a formal, traditional aesthetic, these shingles deliver a look that’s serious without being severe.
  • Morning Harvest – Golden sunlight and a market basket overflowing with the bounty of the garden – if anything inspires warmth and contentment, this is it. These golden tones offer a simple message: welcome.
  • Summer Storm – The world just seems fresher after a good rain. The air smells clean and rain-washed cobblestone streets shimmer like jewels. These shingles capture that mood of renewed optimism, all with not a cloud on the horizon.

“These colors, which are ‘inspired by nature and designed for you,’ will help homeowners express their personal style on the exterior of their homes,” says Paul Casseri, product manager for Atlas Roofing.

In addition, Natural Expressions shingles include all of the great benefits and features of the Pinnacle Pristine line.

Backed by more than 25 years of proven performance, Scotchgard Protector from 3M offers a lifetime limited warranty against black streaks that make roofs look older, tired and ugly. These stains, caused by algae, are prevented thanks to 3M’s copper granules and the way Atlas distributes those granules throughout each shingle.

“Atlas shingles offer the only lifetime warranty against black streaks and stains backed by the power of Scotchgard Protector from 3M,” says Stan Bastek, director of marketing and sales development for Atlas Roofing.

Pinnacle Pristine shingles with the new Natural Expressions palette feature HP42” Technology with an enhanced 1 ½-inch Sweet Spot nailing area and double FASTAC adhesive sealant line that provides a 130 mph wind protection guarantee.

“The reason we can accomplish this high-wind warranty is because we’re thermally sealing the back fiberglass mat of this shingle,” Casseri explains. “That’s where all the strength is coming from.”

All Pinnacle Pristine architectural shingles are eligible for the Atlas Signature Select Roofing System, which includes:

  • Atlas WeatherMaster Ice & Water Underlayment
  • Atlas Premium Underlayment
  • Atlas Pro-Cut Starter Shingles
  • Atlas Roof Shingles
  • Atlas Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge Shingles

Visit AtlasRoofing.com/roof-inspiration to use the Roof and Home Design Studio and download the RoofSwap app to see how the new Natural Expressions colors can enhance the look of any roof.

For more information on all of Atlas Roofing’s products, visit AtlasRoofing.com/roof-shingles.

Shingles Offer Time-Release Technology to Fight Algae Growth

Seeking to reduce the prevalence of unsightly shingle discoloration caused by blue-green algae growth, which impacts 80 percent of U.S. homes, GAF introduces StainGuard Plus Technology. According to the manufacturer, the company’s proprietary time-release copper ion technology releases 10 times as much stain-fighting copper as its traditional copper coated mineral granules to better resist the growth of algae. This technology is currently available on GAF’s Timberline Ultra HD Stainguard Plus labeled shingles and is backed by a 25-year limited warranty against blue-green algae discoloration.

For more information, visit www.GAF.com.

Asphalt Shingles Offer Algae Resistance Warranty

PABCO Algae DefenderPABCO Roofing Products announces its new premium asphalt shingles featuring Algae Defender with an algae resistance warranty. Many areas of the United States are susceptible to black streaks on rooftops caused by algae – especially coastal regions or those that experience high humidity. Preventing those black streaks helps preserve your home’s curb appeal.

PABCO shingles and accessories featuring Algae Defender prevent black streaks caused by algae from forming on your roof, according to the company. “We have a precise target blend of copper containing granules in the manufacturing process and our results are closely monitored during every production run,” explains Rebecca Newman, Plant Operations Manager, “When moisture contacts your Algae Defender protected roof in the form of dew or rain, copper ions are gradually released over time to provide reliable protection from black streaks caused by blue-green algae.”

With more than two decades of experience in producing algae resistant shingles, PABCO has seen proven results from our manufacturing techniques. Newman adds, “We are constantly monitoring our algae resistant shingles in actual field installations to ensure they are performing to our high standards.”

PABCO shingles with Algae Defender are available in most markets where PABCO is sold. “We are excited about the Algae Defender warranty – which is Limited Lifetime for many products – and are confident in the performance.” States Gerry Kilian, General Sales Manager. “It is such a benefit to the homeowner to have that kind of protection.”

For more information, visit pabcoroofing.com.

Community Service Initiative Celebrates America’s Heroes

Habitat for Humanity identifies veterans who are in need of a new roof, and Owens Corning donates the materials. Platinum Preferred Contractors donate their team members’ labor to install the roofing systems. Photos: Owens Corning Roofing

Combine the expertise of a global humanitarian organization with roofing system materials donated by a manufacturer. Add the generosity and community-minded spirit of roofing contractors across the nation. Apply the parties’ collective efforts to honor and protect unsung heroes. What is the outcome? For veterans served by the Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project, the results are safer, more comfortable homes. This article shares the story of how one manufacturer connected its relationship with Habitat for Humanity with the expertise of roofing contractors already active in community service to create an integrated program serving American heroes.

An Idea Is Born and Contractors Collaborate

As the grandson of a veteran who proudly served under General Patton in World War II, Brad Beldon, CEO of Beldon Roofing in San Antonio, Texas, has long respected the service and sacrifice of America’s veterans. In fact, his grandfather’s selfless service inspired Beldon Roofing Company to develop a strong legacy of community outreach. When Brad broached the concept of a community service initiative honoring veterans during a Platinum Contractors Advisory Board meeting in San Antonio, his idea was met with broad enthusiasm. Beldon Roofing completed the first “trial project” which served as a model for the national Roof Deployment Project.

Leveraging the humanitarian spirit of Platinum Preferred Contractors across the nation, the Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project is a multi-stakeholder initiative bringing together Habitat for Humanity, members of the Owens Corning Platinum Preferred Contractor Network and the Owens Corning Foundation to support American veterans. The program fuses Habitat for Humanity’s experience building and restoring homes with the expertise of the network’s members to provide veterans with new roof systems. Each partner in the program plays a distinct role. Habitat identifies veterans who are in need of a new roof but are unable to replace the roofs themselves. Owens Corning donates the roofing system materials including underlayment, shingles and other materials needed to replace roofs in disrepair. Platinum Preferred Contractors donate their team members’ labor to specify materials and install the roofing systems.

Since its inception in Spring 2016, the National Roof Deployment Project has installed nearly 60 roofs, and the program’s momentum continues to grow. The practice of giving back is a time-honored tradition for Platinum Preferred Contractors. Owens Corning Contractor Network Leader Jason Lewinski says the program builds upon Platinum Contractors’ rich history of giving back to their communities. “When we rolled the program out at our Platinum national conference in San Antonio, we saw lots of hands go up and heard contractors say loud and clear, ‘I’m ready and willing to participate,’” said Lewinski. “Not one contractor has ever said, ‘this is new to us’ – as many of our contractors are already so community-minded. And many of them don’t stop at the roof. They often want to provide gutters, soffit, fascia, siding or whatever it takes to make the needed repairs.”

Platinum Contractor Tripp Atkinson, owner of ContractingPRO in Memphis, Tennessee, is a good example of a roofer who is also a community servant. He and his team have donated roofing and siding labor for Brinkley Heights Urban Academy, a Christian missionary organization serving at-risk youth. In addition to ministering to the kids, feeding them or just listening to the kids, ContractingPRO finds opportunities to apply its remodeling expertise to the distressed homes of these under-served youth. Remarking on his involvement in the Roof Deployment Project, Atkinson says, “We’re not just putting on roofs, but giving back in a way that is changing lives and helping these veterans enjoy their homes more.” He adds that community service provides an opportunity for his team to make a difference that extends beyond the business. “It’s very important for us to be part of something that is bigger than ourselves and our company,” he said.

Contractors Give Back to America’s Heroes and Communities

The National Roof Deployment Project’s focus on supporting veterans has been especially appealing to contractors, notes Matt Schroder, communications leader at Owens Corning. “Many contractors have shared that they either served in the military or have close members of their family who are active service members,” Schroder said. He added that the Roof Deployment Project has also opened up opportunities for Owens Corning to partner with veteran-focused organizations such as Purple Heart Homes.

The Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project brings together Habitat for Humanity, members of the Owens Corning Platinum Preferred Contractor Network, and the Owens Corning Foundation to support American veterans. Photos: Owens Corning Roofing

Jon Sabo, owner of RoofRoof in Charlotte, North Carolina, is a good example of a Platinum Preferred Contractor who can relate to the program as a veteran. “As a former Marine myself, I’m personally honored that we’re able to partner with Owens Corning and Habitat to relieve a big stress,” said Sabo, following the donation of a new roof to a veteran. “One of our core values has always been to give back to the communities we serve, and we jumped at the opportunity to be able to give back to someone right in our own back yard.”

Military members’ time away from home can mean maintenance on the home front is neglected. Nick Yadron, owner of M&M Remodeling Services in Crete, Illinois, says that the Roof Deployment Project is an opportunity to say thank you to veterans and help their families. “We all see so much value in this program as a way to say thank you to our veterans. All the Platinum Contractors were really excited when the program was announced a few years ago,” Yadron says.

While he is active in the Chicagoland area, Yadron’s commitment to service goes much further. In 2013 and 2016, he traveled to India on a mission trip where he helped a team establish water wells and build schools. Closer to home, M&M supports Habitat for Humanity. Over the years, his company has also “adopted” a family experiencing hard times and provided new windows, siding and gutters.

Employee and Community Engagement

Even those not directly impacted by the Roof Deployment Project are engaged by the program. According to Don Rettig, Director of Community Relations and President of the Owens Corning Foundation, the Roof Deployment Project has resonated with both Owens Corning employees and the communities served by Platinum Contractors. Rettig says one welcome outcome of the project is the amount of conversation on Owens Corning internal communication channels and social media. “We’re always excited to see our people take pride in our community engagement,” Rettig says. “This partnership with our contractors to help our nation’s veterans has certainly been well received.”

“We know from surveys that some 93 percent of our people appreciate working for a company that provides opportunities to be involved in supporting the local community,” Rettig notes.

Communities have also taken notice of the contractors and veterans involved in the program. In multiple local markets, media outlets ranging from broadcast television stations to daily newspapers and online news sites have shone the spotlight on this program. In several markets, media have come out more than once to report live from veterans’ homes as contractors replaced a roof. “We’ve seen TV stations return to neighborhoods to produce stories about additional projects — even in the same market,” Schroder says.

Making an Impact

A November 6, 2017 article in The New York Times noted an emerging trend in corporate philanthropy is the desire by companies to show both customers and employees that their interests extend beyond making profits, and that companies today are determined to show an impact. As the National Roof Deployment Project illustrates, when roofing contractors, communities, and corporations align with non-profits to engage in service, the results can literally make an impact, one shingle at a time.