TAMKO Donates Roof to Surprise Single Mother with Failing Roof

TAMKO shingles now cover what was gaping holes and the exposed roof deck of Phoenix single mother Rachel’s home only a few weeks ago. Rachel was the beneficiary of a new TAMKO roof and other home repairs during a Phoenix-area 3TV news feature called Arizona’s Family Surprise Squad.

Rachel had just found out she was pregnant with her second child when her fiancé was killed by a drunk driver in 2015. Recent storms tore a hole in her roof and water started leaking into her home, causing further damage. She was nominated for the Surprise Squad by her mother.

The repairs to Rachel’s home were made possible through donations of product and labor from members of the Arizona Roofing Contractors Association’s Young Professionals group, including TAMKO Building Products, Inc. who provided shingles for the roof.

“This story touched all our hearts,” said TAMKO President and CEO David Humphreys. “We’re so glad that we were able to play a part in helping ease the burden from this young mother’s shoulders. And we feel proud to be a part of a group like the Arizona Roofing Contractors Association that is always looking to make a difference in their communities.”

The ARCA Young Professionals group has been involved in several charitable projects in recent years, but the group’s leadership knew there was something special about this situation as soon as they heard Rachel’s story.

Eric Perry, COO of Azul Roofing Solutions and member of the ARCA Young Professionals, said, “The response was overwhelming with people willing to step up and help. I couldn’t be happier with the way it came together. Any time we have the ability to use our skills in this trade to help someone, especially so deserving, like Rachel, it’s a no-brainer. Her response made it all the better too. It just made us want to do more and more for her.”

Some of the other ARCA Young Professionals members involved in the repair project include employees from Lifetime Roofing Systems, Tecta America, Star Roofing, Elite Roofing Supply and Wrecorp.

For more information, visit www.TAMKO.com.

Smog-Reducing Granules Harness the Power of the Sun to Improve Air Quality

The 3M Industrial Mineral Products Division recently launched 3M Smog-Reducing Granules to help remove smog pollution (nitrogen oxides or NOx) using roofing shingles. Integrated throughout a shingle’s surface, 3M’s roofing granules are designed with a specialized photocatalytic coating applied to the base mineral. The specialized coating on the granule is activated by the sun’s UV rays, while blending inconspicuously into various shingle color combinations. As sunlight hits the shingles containing the smog-reducing granules, radicals are generated and transform nitrogen oxide gases into water-soluble ions, improving air quality. According to the company, this smart solution for pollution mitigation can help communities contribute toward their NOx emission reduction efforts.

“3M is leading the way with roofing technology solutions for improving environmental impacts on human health and welfare,” said Frank Klink, senior laboratory manager, 3M. “The roofing granules are a first for residential asphalt shingles. The new 3M granules will help roofing manufacturers develop high quality, aesthetically-pleasing shingles that can turn any roof into an active smog reducing catalyst, essentially becoming smog’s worst enemy.”

To prove out the technology, 3M submitted granule and shingle samples to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for evaluation. Performance testing occurred using challenge gasses in a reaction chamber. Downstream of the system, NOx concentrations were recorded in real time, prior to, during, and after UV illumination. According to the company, the testing validated the efficacy of 3M’s photocatalytic materials in reducing smog and contributing towards air purification.

For more information, visit www.3M.com.

New Color Palette Available for High-Definition Shingles

Atlas Roofing Corporation launches its new Pinnacle Pristine Natural Expressions high-definition color palette.

Natural Expressions’ exhilarating hues are created through a proprietary manufacturing process in which drops of different colors are strategically added to the dragon’s tooth and shim — the parts of the shingle that give it depth and character.

Pinnacle Pristine shingles featuring the Natural Expressions palette pull from rich, color-reserve blends and are available in five bold, designer shades:

  • Coastal Granite – Imagine standing on the windswept coast of Maine and feeling a little thrill to see how the color of the rocks almost matches the pounding seas. This deep gray shingle is anything but neutral.
  • Copper Canyon – Drawn to wide-open spaces and big, dramatic vistas? Looking like they came directly from the rugged landscapes of the Old West, these shingles can’t help but inspire a sense of adventure.
  • Majestic Shake – Know how historic trees have a certain dignity about
 them? Some homes do too. Offering a formal, traditional aesthetic, these shingles deliver a look that’s serious without being severe.
  • Morning Harvest – Golden sunlight and a market basket overflowing with the bounty of the garden – if anything inspires warmth and contentment, this is it. These golden tones offer a simple message: welcome.
  • Summer Storm – The world just seems fresher after a good rain. The air smells clean and rain-washed cobblestone streets shimmer like jewels. These shingles capture that mood of renewed optimism, all with not a cloud on the horizon.

“These colors, which are ‘inspired by nature and designed for you,’ will help homeowners express their personal style on the exterior of their homes,” says Paul Casseri, product manager for Atlas Roofing.

In addition, Natural Expressions shingles include all of the great benefits and features of the Pinnacle Pristine line.

Backed by more than 25 years of proven performance, Scotchgard Protector from 3M offers a lifetime limited warranty against black streaks that make roofs look older, tired and ugly. These stains, caused by algae, are prevented thanks to 3M’s copper granules and the way Atlas distributes those granules throughout each shingle.

“Atlas shingles offer the only lifetime warranty against black streaks and stains backed by the power of Scotchgard Protector from 3M,” says Stan Bastek, director of marketing and sales development for Atlas Roofing.

Pinnacle Pristine shingles with the new Natural Expressions palette feature HP42” Technology with an enhanced 1 ½-inch Sweet Spot nailing area and double FASTAC adhesive sealant line that provides a 130 mph wind protection guarantee.

“The reason we can accomplish this high-wind warranty is because we’re thermally sealing the back fiberglass mat of this shingle,” Casseri explains. “That’s where all the strength is coming from.”

All Pinnacle Pristine architectural shingles are eligible for the Atlas Signature Select Roofing System, which includes:

  • Atlas WeatherMaster Ice & Water Underlayment
  • Atlas Premium Underlayment
  • Atlas Pro-Cut Starter Shingles
  • Atlas Roof Shingles
  • Atlas Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge Shingles

Visit AtlasRoofing.com/roof-inspiration to use the Roof and Home Design Studio and download the RoofSwap app to see how the new Natural Expressions colors can enhance the look of any roof.

For more information on all of Atlas Roofing’s products, visit AtlasRoofing.com/roof-shingles.

Shingles Offer Time-Release Technology to Fight Algae Growth

Seeking to reduce the prevalence of unsightly shingle discoloration caused by blue-green algae growth, which impacts 80 percent of U.S. homes, GAF introduces StainGuard Plus Technology. According to the manufacturer, the company’s proprietary time-release copper ion technology releases 10 times as much stain-fighting copper as its traditional copper coated mineral granules to better resist the growth of algae. This technology is currently available on GAF’s Timberline Ultra HD Stainguard Plus labeled shingles and is backed by a 25-year limited warranty against blue-green algae discoloration.

For more information, visit www.GAF.com.

Asphalt Shingles Offer Algae Resistance Warranty

PABCO Algae DefenderPABCO Roofing Products announces its new premium asphalt shingles featuring Algae Defender with an algae resistance warranty. Many areas of the United States are susceptible to black streaks on rooftops caused by algae – especially coastal regions or those that experience high humidity. Preventing those black streaks helps preserve your home’s curb appeal.

PABCO shingles and accessories featuring Algae Defender prevent black streaks caused by algae from forming on your roof, according to the company. “We have a precise target blend of copper containing granules in the manufacturing process and our results are closely monitored during every production run,” explains Rebecca Newman, Plant Operations Manager, “When moisture contacts your Algae Defender protected roof in the form of dew or rain, copper ions are gradually released over time to provide reliable protection from black streaks caused by blue-green algae.”

With more than two decades of experience in producing algae resistant shingles, PABCO has seen proven results from our manufacturing techniques. Newman adds, “We are constantly monitoring our algae resistant shingles in actual field installations to ensure they are performing to our high standards.”

PABCO shingles with Algae Defender are available in most markets where PABCO is sold. “We are excited about the Algae Defender warranty – which is Limited Lifetime for many products – and are confident in the performance.” States Gerry Kilian, General Sales Manager. “It is such a benefit to the homeowner to have that kind of protection.”

For more information, visit pabcoroofing.com.

Community Service Initiative Celebrates America’s Heroes

Habitat for Humanity identifies veterans who are in need of a new roof, and Owens Corning donates the materials. Platinum Preferred Contractors donate their team members’ labor to install the roofing systems. Photos: Owens Corning Roofing

Combine the expertise of a global humanitarian organization with roofing system materials donated by a manufacturer. Add the generosity and community-minded spirit of roofing contractors across the nation. Apply the parties’ collective efforts to honor and protect unsung heroes. What is the outcome? For veterans served by the Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project, the results are safer, more comfortable homes. This article shares the story of how one manufacturer connected its relationship with Habitat for Humanity with the expertise of roofing contractors already active in community service to create an integrated program serving American heroes.

An Idea Is Born and Contractors Collaborate

As the grandson of a veteran who proudly served under General Patton in World War II, Brad Beldon, CEO of Beldon Roofing in San Antonio, Texas, has long respected the service and sacrifice of America’s veterans. In fact, his grandfather’s selfless service inspired Beldon Roofing Company to develop a strong legacy of community outreach. When Brad broached the concept of a community service initiative honoring veterans during a Platinum Contractors Advisory Board meeting in San Antonio, his idea was met with broad enthusiasm. Beldon Roofing completed the first “trial project” which served as a model for the national Roof Deployment Project.

Leveraging the humanitarian spirit of Platinum Preferred Contractors across the nation, the Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project is a multi-stakeholder initiative bringing together Habitat for Humanity, members of the Owens Corning Platinum Preferred Contractor Network and the Owens Corning Foundation to support American veterans. The program fuses Habitat for Humanity’s experience building and restoring homes with the expertise of the network’s members to provide veterans with new roof systems. Each partner in the program plays a distinct role. Habitat identifies veterans who are in need of a new roof but are unable to replace the roofs themselves. Owens Corning donates the roofing system materials including underlayment, shingles and other materials needed to replace roofs in disrepair. Platinum Preferred Contractors donate their team members’ labor to specify materials and install the roofing systems.

Since its inception in Spring 2016, the National Roof Deployment Project has installed nearly 60 roofs, and the program’s momentum continues to grow. The practice of giving back is a time-honored tradition for Platinum Preferred Contractors. Owens Corning Contractor Network Leader Jason Lewinski says the program builds upon Platinum Contractors’ rich history of giving back to their communities. “When we rolled the program out at our Platinum national conference in San Antonio, we saw lots of hands go up and heard contractors say loud and clear, ‘I’m ready and willing to participate,’” said Lewinski. “Not one contractor has ever said, ‘this is new to us’ – as many of our contractors are already so community-minded. And many of them don’t stop at the roof. They often want to provide gutters, soffit, fascia, siding or whatever it takes to make the needed repairs.”

Platinum Contractor Tripp Atkinson, owner of ContractingPRO in Memphis, Tennessee, is a good example of a roofer who is also a community servant. He and his team have donated roofing and siding labor for Brinkley Heights Urban Academy, a Christian missionary organization serving at-risk youth. In addition to ministering to the kids, feeding them or just listening to the kids, ContractingPRO finds opportunities to apply its remodeling expertise to the distressed homes of these under-served youth. Remarking on his involvement in the Roof Deployment Project, Atkinson says, “We’re not just putting on roofs, but giving back in a way that is changing lives and helping these veterans enjoy their homes more.” He adds that community service provides an opportunity for his team to make a difference that extends beyond the business. “It’s very important for us to be part of something that is bigger than ourselves and our company,” he said.

Contractors Give Back to America’s Heroes and Communities

The National Roof Deployment Project’s focus on supporting veterans has been especially appealing to contractors, notes Matt Schroder, communications leader at Owens Corning. “Many contractors have shared that they either served in the military or have close members of their family who are active service members,” Schroder said. He added that the Roof Deployment Project has also opened up opportunities for Owens Corning to partner with veteran-focused organizations such as Purple Heart Homes.

The Owens Corning Roof Deployment Project brings together Habitat for Humanity, members of the Owens Corning Platinum Preferred Contractor Network, and the Owens Corning Foundation to support American veterans. Photos: Owens Corning Roofing

Jon Sabo, owner of RoofRoof in Charlotte, North Carolina, is a good example of a Platinum Preferred Contractor who can relate to the program as a veteran. “As a former Marine myself, I’m personally honored that we’re able to partner with Owens Corning and Habitat to relieve a big stress,” said Sabo, following the donation of a new roof to a veteran. “One of our core values has always been to give back to the communities we serve, and we jumped at the opportunity to be able to give back to someone right in our own back yard.”

Military members’ time away from home can mean maintenance on the home front is neglected. Nick Yadron, owner of M&M Remodeling Services in Crete, Illinois, says that the Roof Deployment Project is an opportunity to say thank you to veterans and help their families. “We all see so much value in this program as a way to say thank you to our veterans. All the Platinum Contractors were really excited when the program was announced a few years ago,” Yadron says.

While he is active in the Chicagoland area, Yadron’s commitment to service goes much further. In 2013 and 2016, he traveled to India on a mission trip where he helped a team establish water wells and build schools. Closer to home, M&M supports Habitat for Humanity. Over the years, his company has also “adopted” a family experiencing hard times and provided new windows, siding and gutters.

Employee and Community Engagement

Even those not directly impacted by the Roof Deployment Project are engaged by the program. According to Don Rettig, Director of Community Relations and President of the Owens Corning Foundation, the Roof Deployment Project has resonated with both Owens Corning employees and the communities served by Platinum Contractors. Rettig says one welcome outcome of the project is the amount of conversation on Owens Corning internal communication channels and social media. “We’re always excited to see our people take pride in our community engagement,” Rettig says. “This partnership with our contractors to help our nation’s veterans has certainly been well received.”

“We know from surveys that some 93 percent of our people appreciate working for a company that provides opportunities to be involved in supporting the local community,” Rettig notes.

Communities have also taken notice of the contractors and veterans involved in the program. In multiple local markets, media outlets ranging from broadcast television stations to daily newspapers and online news sites have shone the spotlight on this program. In several markets, media have come out more than once to report live from veterans’ homes as contractors replaced a roof. “We’ve seen TV stations return to neighborhoods to produce stories about additional projects — even in the same market,” Schroder says.

Making an Impact

A November 6, 2017 article in The New York Times noted an emerging trend in corporate philanthropy is the desire by companies to show both customers and employees that their interests extend beyond making profits, and that companies today are determined to show an impact. As the National Roof Deployment Project illustrates, when roofing contractors, communities, and corporations align with non-profits to engage in service, the results can literally make an impact, one shingle at a time.

Steep-Slope Projects: Risks, Considerations and Best Practices for Contractors

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Many contractors treat residential roofing as routine. However, whether a re-roof or new construction, each project can be infinitely complex and should be addressed as such by always accounting for weather and safety issues, as well as proper installation and customer service.

One of the most prominent and popular elements of residential architecture is a steep-slope roof. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), steep-slope roofs have slopes greater than 4:12 and range from 18.5 degrees to 45 degrees or more. While the process of installing a roof with these angles isn’t necessarily much different from a low-slope roof, it can pose more risks and considerations for workers.

Weather Woes

Weather plays an important role in every roofing project, but staying on top of potential issues from Mother Nature is especially crucial during steep-slope jobs.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

In high temperatures, workers may fall victim to heat cramps, heat exhaustion, heatstroke or worse. The best way to beat the heat is to start early and get as much done as possible before the temperature peaks. Starting early in the summer—specifically in the South—can allow work to be completed before daily rain showers roll in. Proper hydration and attire are also important.

Cold temperatures can create even more complications because some manufacturers advise against installing their products in weather below 45 degrees Fahrenheit and certain equipment is susceptible to freezing. Furthermore, workers have to pay extra attention to the grip of their shoes to avoid slipping and falling. Not to mention, freezing-cold hands and feet may cause an otherwise adept worker to become clumsy. Wearing the proper clothing is key during cold-weather jobs, and workers should be advised to keep an eye out for the first signs of frostbite, including cold skin, redness, tingling and numbness.

Safety Considerations

In 2015, falls were the leading cause of private-sector work deaths in the construction industry, accounting for nearly 40 percent of worker fatalities, according to OSHA. In addition, OSHA reports nearly 90 percent of fatal falls happen due to the lack of a fall-protection system.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

When working on a roof slope greater than 4/12, OSHA requires additional safety measures, which include either a guardrail system with toeboards, safety net systems or personal fall arrest systems. Yet, many contractors—especially residential roofers—choose to forgo protective devices because they feel they are not feasible or create a greater hazard. In such cases, OSHA does allow the use of alternative fall-protection methods in residential construction, as long as contractors develop a written, job-specific fall-protection plan that complies with OSHA regulations.

Proper Installation

During the installation process, roofers should keep a few things in mind whether they’re applying shingles to a steep-slope or low-slope structure.

  • Valleys

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Valleys are a critical part of proper roof installation because they experience the most water flow during rainstorms and can be potential leak points.

In an open valley, a piece of aluminum, copper or other type of metal is used to help keep rainwater flowing off the roof. Open valleys are often used when a homeowner wants a showier look, such as on a Colonial-style home.

Closed valleys—the most common valley installation method—use asphalt shingles and offer a more traditional look. When properly installed, they keep water from getting trapped in the valley and allow for proper drainage.

In addition to open and closed valleys, contractors also have the option to create a weave valley, which alternates shingles through the valley from both sides, creating a braid-like effect.

Laminate/architectural shingles should not be used for weave valleys. Because laminate shingles aren’t one-dimensional, they do not create the flat surface needed for a weave valley, which should only be used with three-tab shingles.

When using laminate shingles, be sure to follow instructions on the wrapper for either an open or closed application.

Contractors also need to be extremely careful around obstacles such as chimneys and skylights, which require their own flashing and water divergence methods. For instance, more flashing may be needed in these areas to divert water and prevent leaks.

  • Starter Shingles

Starter shingles allow the first course of shingles to properly seal down, protecting the edge of the roof and providing anchoring power for high-wind resistance at the critical eave and rake areas. They further protect the roof by filling in spaces under the cutouts and edges for the first course of exposed shingles, preventing wind uplift.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

The most common mistake when installing starter shingles or modifying traditional three-tab shingles is putting them on backward or upside-down.

Additionally, the overhang should be no more than three-quarters of an inch to prevent wind from penetrating beneath shingles, as well as to keep shingles from curling or cracking.

In addition, many manufacturers caution against double-stacking pallets of starter shingles, which can cause the bottom shingles to warp. Be sure to read all storage and handling instructions prior to installation.

  • Underlayment

Underlayment is an important part of the roofing process and is required by code for residential properties to meet Class A fire requirements. Serving as a secondary barrier, underlayment protects rakes, eaves and critical flashings from water infiltration. Most warranties also require underlayment for the roof to be ASTM compliant. However, some contractors still opt not to use it because they want to save time on a project or their customer balks at the cost.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Another frequent error during underlayment installation is incorrect overlaps. On low-slope roofs (slopes between 2:12 and 4:12), underlayment should have double coverage. And while traditional installation is fine on steep-slope roofs, always follow manufacturer instructions for overlaps from course to course.

Last but not least, be sure to keep underlayment from wrinkling, which can cause ripples in the shingles. While trying to keep underlayment as flat as possible, avoid pulling it too tight because it has a natural expansion and contraction. If underlayment gets wet, be sure it adequately dries out before continuing the installation process.

  • Shingles and Nails

Shingles should be installed with the manufacturer’s recommended offset, which will help prevent leak points and also properly align the shingles across the roof. Once all of the shingles are aligned, only the shingles themselves should be exposed—not the nails.

Because the common bond area is the strongest part of a shingle, manufacturers require nails be placed there to achieve the advertised wind performance. Nails should not be too high or too low, or unevenly spaced. If nails aren’t positioned correctly, the manufacturer’s wind warranty may not be valid.

Customer Service Follow-Up

Providing excellent customer service is key to every roofing job. Homeowners who have a good experience are more likely to share positive reviews and opinions.

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Photos: Atlas Roofing

Before starting a steep-slope project, be sure to discuss the entire process with homeowners to ensure that they know what to expect, as well as the types of warranties they will receive with their new roof. In addition, prepare the surrounding property, such as windows and landscaping, to prevent damage during the installation process.

During the job, be sure workers are vigilant about not dropping nails anywhere on the jobsite. After the job, walk the property with the homeowners to ensure all debris and materials were cleaned up; magnets can be used to double-check for stray nails. If the homeowners are happy with the finished product and their experience, don’t be afraid to ask them to write a nice review on the company website, Angie’s List, Yelp or other customer referral app.

Most of the best practices for steep-slope roofing can be applied to any type of roofing project. However, steep-slope work can pose additional challenges that other projects may not. Always follow manufacturer’s instructions and OSHA guidelines on all roofing jobs, but especially on steep-slope projects, when one minor slip could turn into major consequences for all involved.

About the Author: Paul Casseri is the product manager of the Roofing Shingles and Underlayment Division for Atlas Roofing Corp., www.atlasroofing.com. He is responsible for all areas of product management, including product initiation, feasibility, design, development and testing. He is a graduate of Penn State University with more than 20 years of experience in the building products industry.

 

New Shingles Speed Up Installation Process in First Test in the Field

This residence in the Atlanta area

This residence in the Atlanta area is the first house in the country to have Atlas shingles with HP42” technology installed on its roof. Photos: Atlas Roofing

Atlas shingles with HP42” technology, a new format introduced in July, were recently installed on a home in the Atlanta area. It is the first roof in the country to be installed with the new shingles, and the homeowner, contractor and manufacturer are all pleased with the results.

Larger than any shingle currently made in the United States, the HP42” shingle format results in a faster installation, as well as significant savings in labor and materials for contractors, according to the manufacturer. HP42” format shingles are the new standard for the Atlas StormMaster Shake, Pinnacle Pristine and ProLam shingle lines.

“These new high-performance HP42” format shingles are larger and better engineered, which makes them easier and faster to install,” says Paul Casseri, product manager of Atlas Roofing Shingles and Underlayment Division. “As a result, contractors and crew can expect a drastically improved installation experience.”

Faster on The Roof

Contractor Dirk Gowder of Ryno Roof in Atlanta says the HP42” shingle format made the project a breeze. “The larger shingle sped up installation time by about 10 percent because there’s less waste, more courses per run, and there’s less cutting of the shingles,” Gowder explains.

With the benefit of using fewer shingles and experiencing less waste, this particular job was easily completed in one day, giving Gowder’s guys plenty of time to do the finishing touches and clean up around the home.

The Ryno Roof crew also installed Summit 60 Synthetic Underlayment, Atlas Pro-Cut 10X Starter Shingles and Pro-Cut Hip & Ridge Shingles featuring Scotchgard Protector, which helps a home maintain its appearance by resisting ugly black streaks caused by algae. The project used Atlas Pinnacle Pristine shingles in Pristine Hearthstone, seamlessly mixing both HP and HP42” format shingles on the roof.

Mix and Match

“The install process, even with the mixed shingles, couldn’t have been simpler,” Gowder says. “It was an easy transition from the standard-sized shingles to the 42-inch shingles. The new HP42” format shingle fits the pallet perfectly, so all of the shingles were nice and straight and flat when we opened every single bundle. My guys moved through the install just like they would have if this were a standard roof job with only one type of shingle. The Atlas quick start guide had clear, easy-to-follow instructions that made the job go smoothly.”

The shingle is a full 42 inches wide and 14 inches high

The shingle is a full 42 inches wide and 14 inches high, with a 6-inch exposure. It features an enhanced 1½-inch nailing area. Photos: Atlas Roofing

The old format of the Atlas HP shingles and new HP42” format shingles both have the same 6-inch exposure, which allows them to be mixed on a roof—as long as the products come from the same plant. Shingles made in different plant locations may contain a different granule blend and can vary in color.

For any roof installation, contractors should follow the manufacturer’s printed installation instructions, which include keeping the shingle seams outside 5 inches of each other in relation to the shingles in the previous and proceeding course when mixing the shingle sizes.

“After using HP42” format shingles on the test house, I’m going to start using them on all of my jobs because they make installation easier and faster and save me money because I don’t have to order as many bundles since they produce less waste,” Gowder states.

The roof qualifies for the Atlas Signature Select Roofing System warranty, which comes with a built-in extended protection period.

“The quality Atlas products, backed up by the Signature Select coverage, will protect this home for a long time,” Gowder says.

IKO PRO4 Plus Roofing Components System Promotion Awards New Truck

Idaho-based contractor KD Roofing is the recipient of a Dodge RAM 1500 Tradesman pickup truck as well as $22,500 in cash bonuses, thanks to its performance in the IKO PRO4 Plus Roofing Components System Promotion.

The initial PRO4 promotion was first introduced to encourage contractors to experience the benefits of working with a roofing system by offering rebate incentives. It was upgraded to the PRO4 Plus Promotion in 2016 to include per-square rebates for contractors, along with cash bonuses and the chance to earn a brand-new pickup truck for their fleet — which will continue in 2017.

For example, participating contractors have the opportunity to earn up to an $8.00 rebate per square when installed with any three components from the PRO4 Roofing Components System — in addition to up to $22,500 in cash bonuses and a top-tier incentive of a new truck.

Family Success

Located just outside of Boise in Meridian, Idaho, KD Roofing provides a variety of residential and commercial roofing services with a specialty in new construction. Following in the footsteps of their father and KD Roofing’s founder, Kendall Doty, brothers Justin and Jared Doty, office manager and general manager at KD Roofing, helped to drive the company’s success in the promotion.

“We feel blessed to have earned this recognition and are pleased to put the cash bonus and truck back into use for the company,” Justin says.

Additionally, Jared noted that KD Roofing’s Production Manager, David Allen, who has been a long-time employee and friend of the company, also played a role in the success thanks to his continued support in the growth of the company.

“It goes without saying that we have the entire KD Roofing team to thank for this accomplishment,” Jared says.

Distributor and Manufacturer Support

The Doty brothers also noted that support from their distributor, Roofline Supply and Delivery (a division of SRS Distribution), was an element to their success. In fact, the branch manager for Roofline’s Boise location, James Phillips, first introduced the promotion to the KD Roofing team.

“I’ve had a relationship with the KD team almost my entire career in the roofing industry, so when I learned of the PRO4 Plus Promotion, I knew it was a good fit for them,” Phillips says. “But things like this don’t happen overnight; it takes a lot of work and dedication to achieve what the KD Roofing team did. They’ve also built a reputation and trust among their customers by delivering service for more than 20 years.”

IKO Territory Sales Representative, Andrew Buehner, also worked closely with Phillips and the KD Roofing team during the promotion. He helped provide product knowledge and expertise, as well as local service and support to keep the promotion running smoothly for KD Roofing, Phillips added.

“We were onboard with the promotion after discussion with Roofline, but once they introduced us to our IKO rep, Andrew, we knew it was going to be great working with IKO,” Jared says. “IKO is a family-owned business like ours and shares similar valuesplus.”

Coordinating Roofing Components

A roofing components system is engineered to provide more performance than installing just shingles alone.

As such, IKO has developed the PRO4 roofing components system, which includes four multi-layered roofing accessories that protect vulnerable areas of the roof, including eave protection (ice and water protectors), underlayment (for deck protection), roof starters (starter strips to save installation time) and ridge cap shingles (provide protection along a roof’s high-stress areas and accentuate the roof line).

“Our favorite part of working with the PRO4 system is offering our clients a shingle and coordinating components from a single manufacturer,” Jared says. “It’s a benefit for our customers when we assure them it’s one system that’s intended to work together.”

To see a video interview featuring the KD Roofing team and additional details on the IKO PRO4 Plus Promotion, please visit the IKO TV YouTube channel. For more information about IKO’s complete portfolio of residential roofing products and accessories, visit the website.

Atlas Roofing Roadshow Enhances Contractor Business Skills

Atlas Roofing has hit the road with its roadshow, visiting cities across the country. The purpose of this journey is to help contractors enhance the business skills that will increase their job close rate and maximize customer satisfaction.

“Our roadshows are designed to help contractors outshine the competition and maximize closing opportunities,” says Stan Bastek, Atlas director of Marketing and Sales Development. “We have built a rapport with contractors through events like these, and we, in turn, learn a lot from them.

“The main purpose of this roadshow is to share our ideas with everyone while educating contractors about our product line and marketing programs.”

The 2017 Atlas Roofing Roadshow will feature the following sessions:

  • Learn how to become a 3M Scotchgard Shingle Sales Specialist
  • Control your cash flow with Genesis Contractor Solutions
  • Set yourself apart: Sell on value, not on price and land more jobs
  • HP Shingle Technology: How to save both time and money on installation
  • Boost your social impact: Learn how to maximize your social media to gain leads and increase referrals.

The Roadshow provides an opportunity for roofing contractors to learn about product innovations and marketing partnerships that can be leveraged from Atlas Roofing. Professional headshots will be taken of all participants, free of charge. And as always, there will be more than $5,000 in giveaways and prizes for the lucky few who win the fun roadshow-themed game show, What’s That Streaking.

“Stan and his crew of Atlas professionals impressed me,” says Josh Thompson of Storm Doctors Inc. in Peachtree City, Ga. at this past year’s roadshow in Atlanta. “They had product knowledge and presentations. Although I’ve wanted to go to one of these events for a while, this was the first time I was able to attend. And I’m going home with some helpful knowledge,”

Atlas Roadshow events are half-day conventions open to contractors, their staff members and Atlas distribution partners. Registration is required to attend, but admission is free. This year, we will hit these markets:

  • Oklahoma City – Jan. 26
  • Minneapolis – Feb. 1
  • Ann Arbor, Mich. – Spring 2017
  • Nashville, Tenn. – Spring 2017
  • Philadelphia – Spring 2017
  • Pensacola, Fla. – Date TBA
  • Austin/San Antonio – Date TBA
  • Tampa, Fla. – Date TBA
  • Baton Rouge/New Orleans – Date TBA
  • Dallas – Date TBA