RoofPoint Administration Transfers to Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress

The Roofing Industry Alliance for Progress announces the administration of RoofPoint has been transferred to the Alliance. RoofPoint is a voluntary, consensus-based green building rating system that provides a means for building owners and designers to select nonresidential roof systems based on long-term energy and environmental benefits.

Originally developed by the Center for Environmental Innovation in Roofing and co-sponsored by the Alliance, RoofPoint is a roofing-specific version of a green building rating system that promotes an environmentally responsible built environment.

“The increasing need for energy efficient and environmentally friendly roof systems makes RoofPoint an important component of our industry,” says Alliance president, James T. Patterson C.P.M of CentiMark Corporation, Canonsburg, Pa. “We are pleased to have the opportunity to manage RoofPoint, and to continue the essential role it plays in promoting environmentally sustainable buildings.”

To ensure a smooth transfer of RoofPoint to the Alliance, a task force has been established to examine RoofPoint’s data and determine next steps.

Task force members are Rob Therrien, president of The Melanson Co. Inc., Keene, N.H.; Helene Hardy-Pierce, vice president of technical services, codes and industry relations for GAF, Parsippany, N.J.; Brian Whelan, senior vice president of Sika Sarnifil Inc., Lyndhurst, N.J.; Jim Barr, president of Barr Roofing Co., Abilene, Texas; and Mark Graham, vice president of technical services for the National Roofing Contractor Association (NRCA), Rosemont, Ill.

The task force will present its recommendations to the Alliance Board of Trustees during its Nov. 17 meeting in Chicago.

Projects: Education

University of Virginia, Rotunda, Charlottesville

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819.

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819.

TEAM

ROOFING CONTRACTOR: W.A. Lynch Roofing, Charlottesville
ARCHITECT: John G. Waite Associates, Albany, N.Y.
JOINT-VENTURE BUILDER: Christman-Gilbane, Reston, Va., ChristmanCo.com and GilbaneCo.com
LEAD-ABATEMENT CONTRACTOR: Special Renovations Inc., Chesterfield, Va.

ROOF MATERIALS

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper. W.A. Lynch Roofing sheared 4,000 individual tiles to approximate dimensions in its sheet-metal shop, and a makeshift sheet-metal shop was set up on top of the scaffolding to complete the final measurements and exact cuts.

COPPER SUPPLIER: N.B. Handy Co., Lynchburg, Va.
COPPER MANUFACTURER: Hussey Copper, Leetsdale, Pa.

ROOF REPORT

The University of Virginia was founded by Thomas Jefferson in 1819. Jefferson modeled his design—presented to the university board in 1821—after the Pantheon in Rome. Although he died in 1826 while the Rotunda was still under construction, the stunning building housed the university’s library as Jefferson envisioned.

The rotunda renovation is a two-phase project, and roofing work was part of Phase 1. The roofing team believed seven months was adequate to complete the job; the university, however, requested it be complete by April 2013 so scaffolding would be removed in time for the commencement ceremony. That gave the team a four-month timeline.

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper.

The domed roof required about 6 tons of 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper.

Tom McGraw, executive vice president of W.A. Lynch Roofing, explains: “This was just short of impossible even if it wasn’t winter. But as a graduate of UVA, I recognized the basis of the request and agreed to it. So we doubled the manpower and went to a 10-hour day, seven-day a week schedule. We divided the roof into four equal quadrants, each separated by an expansion joint and put a crew in each area working simultaneously with the other three. We also added support personnel in our sheet-metal shop, as well as runners to keep the flow of material to the job site on schedule for the sheet-metal mechanics. In the final analysis, we made the schedule and completed our work within the owner’s request.”

The roofing project was essential because of rust on the previous terne-coated metal roof. It was determined the rust was caused by inadequate roof ventilation that created condensation on the underside of the metal roofing. Ventilation was lacking because of a Guastavino tile dome that was installed in 1895. The condensation was addressed by installing a concealed venting system at the intersections of the treads and risers at the seven steps in the roof, as well as at the top of the dome below the oculus. “Heated air has low density so it will logically rise creating natural convection,” McGraw notes. “This convection creates air movement below the roof and minimizes dead air spaces and the potential for condensation. The key to this is ensuring that you size the ‘intake’ venting similar to the ‘exhaust’ venting so that air will flow in an unrestricted fashion.”

Reroofing a dome can be a challenge, and determining how to keep the interior and its priceless valuables dry required some ingenuity. McGraw invented a tarp that he compares to a hooped skirt to keep the space watertight. The roofing crew cut trapezoidal sections of EPDM membrane and installed them from the bottom to the top of the dome. This skirt-like tarp was configured out of eight pieces at the bottom, six at the midpoint and four at the top. The maximum cut sizes for each level were determined using a computer drawing. Creating the EPDM covering in sections made the tarp easy to handle and remove. “If we seamed it all together or made it in less pieces, the guys wouldn’t have been able to lift it,” McGraw adds.

The tear-off process involved removing the painted metal panels according to lead-abatement standards; the panels were cleaned offsite to maintain the integrity and safety of the job site. A new wood deck was installed on furring over the tiles. This was covered with 30-pound roofing felt and red rosin building paper followed by the new copper roof.

Each piece of copper was tinned and folded before being installed. This process was necessary because of the lack of symmetry on the building. McGraw recalls: “Because this building is almost 200-years old, you have to recognize that not everything is as true and square as one might hope. There are seven steps that circle the base of the dome, and each tread and riser changed in height and width all the way around the building.”

This is the fourth roof for the Rotunda. The first was a tin-plate roof designed by Thomas Jefferson; the second was copper that was a replacement roof after a fire in 1895; the third roof was painted terne-coated steel from 1976; and the current roof is 20-ounce Flat-Lock copper that will be painted white. The decision to select copper was based on cost, durability and historic appearance.

Phase 2 of the project began in May, and the Rotunda will be closed for repairs until 2016. At a price of $42.5 million, utility, fire protection and mechanical upgrades will be made, as well as a Dome Room ceiling replacement and construction of a new underground service vault. The roof also will be painted white, and leaking gutters will be repaired during this phase.

PHOTOS: DAN GROGAN PHOTOGRAPHY

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New Roof Must Last as Long as the Solar Panels It Supports

As thousands of Silicon Valley employees exited Hewlett-Packard (HP) global operations headquarters to head home for the evening, a crew of 25 roofers–under the glare of temporary spotlights–toiled diligently. They were fastening thousands of 1/2-inch DensDeck Prime coverboards to the 10-year-old insulation system covering the building’s metal deck.

Originally planned to be white, Hewlett-Packard ultimately selected a tan-colored membrane, to reduce glare because two levels of the building have glass-to-ceiling windows that allow visual access to the roof.

Originally planned to be white, Hewlett-Packard ultimately selected a tan-colored membrane, to reduce glare because two levels of the building have glass-to-ceiling windows that allow visual access to the roof.

Soon after, they adhered a single-ply, fleece-faced, tan-colored Sika Sarnafil EnergySmart roof membrane to the DensDeck Prime boards, creating a state-of-the-art 300,000-square-foot reroof. The added protection was much-needed, as it provided the durability and compressive strength to safely accommodate a massive system of solar panels that were installed atop 85 percent of the roof.

“We chose DensDeck Prime because it provides the best support for the new membrane, the existing roof and all the (solar) equipment that will go on top of it,” explains Steve Nash, vice president of Waterproofing Associates, who designed the reroof system in conjunction with Ted Christensen of Independent Roofing Consultants, and selected the materials to make it work. “With all the weight that will be bearing directly on the roof membrane, we need the ultimate roof substrate.”

Installing the massive, electricity-generating system of solar panels was an intricate endeavor, especially because its presence will complicate any repairs to the roof during the solar energy system’s anticipated 25-year life cycle. The building owner called on Nash to create a roof with a life cycle that would mirror the life of the solar panels.

The building owner desired a roof with a life cycle that would mirror the 25-year life span of the solar panels, which cover 85 percent of the roof.

The building owner desired a roof with a life cycle that would mirror the 25-year life span of the solar panels, which cover 85 percent of the roof.

“If the roof were to need repairs, the solar panels would have to be disassembled and out of service until the repairs are finished. And that can’t happen,” Nash adds. “Basically, we have to build a virtually maintenance-free roof.”

Protection—Above and Below

Cost-effective because of its energy efficiency and high levels of dimensional stability, the Sika Sarnafil G410 membrane is frequently installed over an underlayment of DensDeck Prime because its surface treatment provides a stronger bond for adhered membrane applications. Also, DensDeck Prime roof boards’ high pounds per square inch (PSI) compressive strength is an advantage as a durable platform for roofs with heavy equipment, like solar panels, on top.

Adding further complexity to the building’s new roofing system was the fact that the owner chose only to replace the original membrane—from another manufacturer—that had sprung a number of leaks in recent years. Keeping the remainder of the original roof—2 inches of fiberglass insulation, a built-up gravel surface and 1/2 inch of fiberboard—saved considerable time and money, as well as avoided having to send thousands of pounds of materials to landfills.

However, it did require adding the layer of DensDeck Prime to do double duty: carefully protect the layers of the original roof that would remain while forming the foundation for the Sika Sarnafil membrane.

Upon completion of the five-week project, which was conducted only at night and on weekends so the noise wouldn’t interrupt the HP employees during normal work hours, the new roof is aesthetically pleasing. Originally planned to be white, the owners ultimately selected a tan-colored membrane, to reduce glare because two levels of the building have glass-to-ceiling windows that allow visual access to the roof.

Nash notes the new roof’s beauty will only be exceeded by its durability. “With thousands of pounds of solar panels sitting on top of it, the roofing membrane cannot fail. So you get the best materials available to make it last—and that’s exactly what we’ve done.”