OMG RhinoBond Projects Are Being Completed Across Europe

OMG Roofing’s RhinoBond System has left marks across Europe with more than 125 completed projects and more in the pipeline. Collectively, these projects represent more than 300,000 square meters (3.2 million square feet) of single-ply roofing.

“In last two years, the RhinoBond System has started to take off across Europe, as more roofing contractors have seen the roof performance benefits that the system can offer,” states Web Shaffer, vice president of marketing for OMG Roofing Products. “We have completed projects across Europe and we are expanding to new countries in the region, most recently, into South East Europe.”

RhinoBond is a method for installing thermoplastic and now also clean EPDM membrane. The system consists of a stand-up induction welding tool and magnetic cooling clamps. Contractors install roofing insulation using fasteners and specially coated plates designed specifically for the type of membrane being installed – PVC, TPO or Clean EPDM. Each plate is then bonded to the roof membrane installed over the top with the RhinoBond plate welding tool. The result is a roofing system that can provide wind performance with fewer fasteners, fewer membrane seams and zero penetrations of the new membrane.

The RhinoBond System is approved for use in Europe by many roof system providers, including Bauder, Carlisle/Hertalan, Danosa, Fatra, FDT, Firestone, GAF, IcoPal, IKO, Renolit, Sika, Siplast, and Soprema/Flag.

Headquartered in Agawam, Mass., OMG Roofing Products is a supplier of commercial roofing products including specialty fasteners, insulation adhesives, roof drains, pipe supports, emergency roof repair tape as well as productivity tools such as RhinoBond. The company’s focus is delivering products and services that improve contractor productivity and enhance roof system performance. For additional information, please contact OMG Roofing Products at (413)789-0252 or visit the OMG Roofing website.

A Michigan Contractor Is Challenged to Recreate a Roof’s 40-year-old Mural

Kevin Clausen has faced a lot of challenges during his 30 years at Great Lakes Systems, a Jenison, Mich.-based construction company specializing in single-ply commercial roofs. But when he received a call several years ago from a Kent County official about an unusual upcoming project, Clausen knew he might be taking on a challenge unlike any other.

Artist Alexander Calder created the 127-square-foot red, black and white mural painted on the roof of the Kent County Administration building.

Artist Alexander Calder created the 127-square-foot red, black and white mural painted on the roof of the Kent County Administration building.

Kent County is home to Grand Rapids, Mich. To understand the challenge that Clausen was about to face, it’s important to understand a little Grand Rapids history. In the late 1960s, swept along by the tide of enthusiasm for urban renewal, the city demolished 120 buildings in its aging downtown core and built a new City Hall and County Administration building, surrounded by a concrete plaza. The new government buildings were designed by architects who were shaped by mid-century ideas of good urban design: sleek, boxy single-use structures, easily accessed by automobile and, therefore, providing ample parking. Pedestrians were something of an afterthought.

At about the same time, the National Endowment for the Arts initiated its Art in Public Places Program. There was general agreement in Grand Rapids that the broad plaza in front of the new buildings seemed empty and generally lacked visual interest. The city applied for a grant to support the funding of a monumental sculpture to serve as a focal point for its new plaza and selected renowned sculptor Alexander Calder for the commission. Two years later, Calder’s sculpture—bright red, 43- feet tall, 54-feet long, 30-feet wide, weighing 42 tons—took its place on the central plaza. It was named “La Grande Vitesse”, which roughly translates into “Grand Rapids”. For obvious reasons, the broad plaza has been called Calder Plaza—and has been the focus of controversy ever since.

The Calder sculpture at ground level on the plaza inspired another important work of art in the area. The flat, unadorned roof of the administration building adjacent to the plaza was drawing attention for the wrong reasons. It was easily viewed from the nearby taller buildings, including the new City Hall, and several city administrators thought some sort of added visual element was necessary for the space. Calder again was pressed into service and designed a large mural for the roof of the administration building. When it was completed in 1974, the 127-square-foot red, black and white mural painted on the roof of the Kent County Administration building was the largest Calder painting in the world.

A DURABLE ROOF

Fast-forward three decades and the aging modified bitumen roofing membrane, which supported the Calder mural, had weathered badly and was in need of repair or replacement. The challenge? How to repair the roof and still preserve the Calder mural. Given the deteriorated condition of the roofing membrane, a complete tear-off was required. Basically, the task at hand was to replace the canvas of a painting and recreate the painting, maintaining its original appearance.

Great Lakes Systems, Jenison, Mich., was challenged to recreate the Calder mural on a new EPDM roof after tearing off the modified bitumen roof on which the mural was originally painted.

Great Lakes Systems, Jenison, Mich., was challenged to recreate the Calder mural on a new EPDM roof after tearing off the modified bitumen roof on which the mural was originally painted.

The team at Great Lakes Systems has a long track record of doing work for Kent County, including the jail, juvenile facility and several libraries. Therefore, county leaders turned to Great Lakes Systems when they realized they need- ed a creative solution to repair their unique roof. Clausen says the county wanted to preserve the mural, but a long-lasting, durable roof was a top priority. “They definitely wanted a high-quality roof,” he says.

The project faced other constraints, in addition to the painted surface. The administration building is located in a prominent spot in the middle of downtown Grand Rapids, near the museum dedicated to former President Gerald Ford and adjacent to two major expressways. No interruption of normal activities could be allowed—either on the plaza or in the building supporting the Calder mural. And—perhaps most challenging—Great Lakes Systems was given three weeks to complete the project before the inaugural ArtPrize competition would take over much of downtown Grand Rapids. That meant the team would have two weeks for the roof installation, leaving one week to repaint the mural. This was less than half the time usually required for a comparable project.

For Clausen, one part of the project was easy. He had used EPDM membrane on a variety of prior projects for county buildings, and county officials had been pleased with the results, especially the balance of cost-effective installation and long service life. “We looked at other membranes, given the nature of the project, but we always came back to EPDM, given its 30-year plus lifespan,” Clausen notes. “If we have to paint again, that’s OK, but we don’t want to reroof.”

For this project, fully adhered EPDM, as well as insulation ad- hered to the concrete deck, offered two important benefits: a painting surface that would be appropriate for the repainted mural and minimal noise (compared to a mechanically attached system) so that work in the building below could continue as normal.

Great Lakes Systems used 60-mil EPDM to replace the aging modified bitumen system. The 18,500-square-foot roof was backed by two layers of 2-inch polyiso insulation, and the EPDM membrane was covered with an acrylic top coat to provide a smooth surface for the new painting. The top coat matched the three colors of the mural—red, black and white. The red was a custom tinted acrylic paint deemed to be compatible with the EPDM membrane and the black and white acrylic top coat provided by the EPDM manufacturer.

Great Lakes Systems took aerial photos of the existing roof, created a grid of the roof and—scaling the design from the photos—recreated the mural exactly, a sort of large-scale paint- by-number approach.

Great Lakes Systems took aerial photos of the existing roof, created a grid of the roof and—scaling the design from the photos—recreated the mural exactly, a sort of large-scale paint- by-number approach.

A BEAUTIFUL ROOF

The Great Lakes Systems’ team applied a creative approach to recreate the mural, adhering carefully to the original design. Because the county used the same colors on its street signs as in the original mural, color codes were available to allow the team to access colors that were identical to those specified by Calder.

Great Lakes Systems took aerial photos of the existing roof, created a grid of the roof and—scaling the design from the photos—recreated the mural exactly, a sort of large-scale paint-by-number approach. The most intricate part of the painting was the layout. Although some free-hand painting had to be done along several jagged edges, the team painstakingly followed the scaled grid and applied chalk lines to outline the original design on the repaired roof. Roller applications were used at the border of the chalk lines to define individual spaces and mark the stopping and starting points for the different colors. Following this “outlining” work, the large areas were sprayed to complete the painting process. The three-man painting crew finished the job with several days to spare, helped along with very good weather.

The roofing project was an informal jump-start toward reimagining uses for Calder Plaza. This past summer, Grand Rapids residents were given the opportunity to voice their preferences for new landscaping for the plaza, provide input for activities that would attract more families and children, and generally make the space more pedestrian friendly. The new proposals are generating excitement and enthusiasm in Grand Rapids. As the new plans become reality, the citizens of Grand Rapids can be assured the Calder mural and the roof supporting it will be doing their part to add beauty and shelter to Calder Plaza and its buildings for decades to come.

Roof Materials

60-mil EPDM: Firestone Building Products Co.
2-inch Polyiso Insulation: Firestone Building Products
Black and White Acrylic Top Coat: Firestone Building Products

PHOTOS: Great Lakes Systems

Johns Manville Plans to Build Second Production Line at Its Alabama Manufacturing Facility

Johns Manville (JM), a global building and specialty products manufacturer and a Berkshire Hathaway company, announced plans to build a second production line at the company’s Scottsboro, Ala., manufacturing facility. The new line will increase production capacity for JM TPO (thermoplastic polyolefin).

“This significant investment continues JM’s long-standing commitment to our customers, the industry, our employees and the communities in which we serve,” says Mary Rhinehart, JM’s president and CEO.

State and local officials in Alabama welcomed the announcement. “Alabama workers make all kinds of great products, and I am honored that Johns Manville has decided to expand its plant in Scottsboro with new capital investment that means more jobs for Alabama residents,” Gov. Robert Bentley says. “Creating jobs and opportunity in the state is my No. 1 priority, and we are committed to helping Johns Manville achieve success with this project in Jackson County.”

“JM has been an important member of our community for eight years,” says Scottsboro Mayor Melton Potter. “Their recent capacity expansion and the announcement of adding a second line shows JM’s confidence in our workforce to produce the best TPO in the industry. I thank JM for choosing to make this investment in Scottsboro and Jackson County.”

In October 2008, JM’s commitment to single ply manufacturing was solidified with the opening of a state-of-the-art TPO facility in Scottsboro. JM furthered its investment in single ply in 2012 with the opening of an EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) manufacturing plant in Milan, Ohio.

The new TPO production line will bring JM’s total investment in commercial roofing over the past eight years to approximately $200 million. Together with putting money back in the American economy and bringing more than 175 jobs to the manufacturing sector, JM’s continued investments allow growth in the industry and extend JM’s areas of roofing expertise and available products.
To meet recent demand for JM TPO, JM began a capacity expansion project in March 2015 at the Scottsboro plant. Construction was completed in May, and now work will begin to construct the second production line.

“The plant expansion was a huge success and made our Scottsboro facility what is, in our view, the most productive and efficient TPO facility in the U.S., enabling us to meet our customers’ needs for the foreseeable future,” says Jennifer Ford-Smith, JM’s director of Marketing and Single Ply. “This new line will give JM the ability to supply our customers with even more JM TPO than was previously available.”

Senior vice president and general manager Robert Wamboldt says, “We’re proud to be a part of the commercial roofing industry, and we believe our 157-year history demonstrates that we are here to stay. This new production line will help JM meet customer demand and remain a supplier of choice in our industry.”

The Roof Cover: The Cap on the Roof System

For nearly two years in this magazine, I have been discussing the various components that make up a roof system: roof deck, substrate boards, vapor/air retarder, insulation and cover boards (see “More from Hutch”, page 3). Although each component delivers its own unique benefit to the system, they are intended to work together. When designing a roofing system, components cannot be evaluated solely on their own and consideration must be taken for a holistic view of the system; all components must work together synergistically for sustainable performance. Unfortunately, I often have seen that when components are not designed to work within the system unintended consequences occur, such as a premature roof system failure. A roof system’s strength is only as good as its weakest link. The roof cover is the last component in the design of a durable, sustainable roof system—defined previously as being of long-term performance, which is the essence of sustainability.

This ballasted 90-mil EPDM roof was designed for 50 years of service life. All the roof-system components were designed to complement each other. The author has designed numerous ballasted EPDM roofs that are still in place providing service.

PHOTO 1: This ballasted 90-mil EPDM roof was designed for 50 years of service life. All the roof-system components
were designed to complement each other. The author has designed numerous ballasted EPDM roofs that are still in place providing service.

The roof cover for this article is defined as the waterproofing membrane outboard of the roof deck and all other roof-system components. It protects the system components from the effects of climate, rooftop use, foot traffic, bird and insect infestation, and animal husbandry. Without it, there is no roof, no protection and no safety. When mankind moved from cave dwellings to the open, the first thing early humans learned to construct was basic roof-cover protection. Thus, roof covers have been in existence since man’s earliest built environment.

WHAT CONSTITUTES AN APPROPRIATE ROOF COVER?

There is no one roof cover that is appropriate for all conditions and climates. It cannot be codified or prescribed, as many are trying to do, and cannot be randomly selected. I, and numerous other consultants, earn a good living investigating roof failures that result from inappropriate roof-cover and system component selection.

There are several criteria for roof-cover selection, such as:

  • Compatibility with selected adhesives and the substrate below.
  • Climate and geographic factors: seacoast, open plains, hills, mountains, snow, ice, hail, rainfall intensity, as well as micro-climates.
  • Compatibility with the effluent coming out of rooftop exhausts.
  • Local building-code requirements, such as R-value, fire and wind requirements.
  • Local contractors knowledgeable and experienced in its installation.
  • Roof use: Will it be just a roof or have some other use, such as supporting daily foot traffic to examine ammonia lines or have fork lifts driven over it?
  • Building geometry: Can the selected roof cover be installed with success or does the building’s configuration work against you?
  • Building occupancy, relative humidity, interior temperature management, building envelope system, interior building pressure management.
  • Building structural systems that support the enclosure.
  • Interfaces with the adjacent building systems.
  • Environmental, energy conservation and related local code/jurisdictional factors.
  • Delivering on the expectations of the building owner: Is it a LEED building? Does he/she want to go above and beyond roof insulation thermal-value requirements to achieve even better energy savings? Is he/she going to sell the building in the near future?

ROOF-COVER TYPES

There are many types of roof-cover options for the designer. Wood, stone, asphalt, tile, metal, reed, thatch, skins, mud and concrete are all roof covers used around the world in steep-slope applications. This article will examine the low-slope materials.

The dominant roof covers in the low-slope roof market are:

    Thermoset: EPDM

  • Roof sheets joined via tape and adhesive
  • Installed: mechanically fastened, fully adhered or ballasted
  • Thermoplastic: TPO or PVC

  • Roof sheets joined via heat welding
  • Installed: mechanically fastened, fully adhered or plate-bonded (often referred to as the “RhinoBond System”)
  • Asphaltic: modified bitumen

  • Installed in hot asphalt, cold adhesive or torch application
  • EPDM (ETHYLENE PROPYLENE DIENE MONOMER)

    Fully adhered EPDM on this high school in the Chicago suburbs is placed over a cover board, which provides a high degree of protection from hail and foot traffic.

    PHOTO 2: Fully adhered EPDM on this high school in the Chicago suburbs is placed over a cover board, which provides a high degree of protection from hail and foot traffic.


    EPDM is produced in three thicknesses— 45, 60 and 90 mil—with and without reinforcing. It can be procured with a fleece backing in traditional black or with a white laminate on top. The lap seams are typically bonded with seam tape and primer.

    EPDM has a 40-year history of performance; I have 30-year-old EPDM roof systems that I have designed that are still in place and still performing. Available in large sheets—up to 50-feet wide and 200-feet long—with factory-applied seam tape, installation can be very efficient. Fleece-back membrane and 90-mil product have superior hail and puncture resistance. Historical concerns with EPDM lap-seam failure revolved around liquid- applied splice adhesive; with seam tape technology this concern is virtually moot. Non-reinforced ballasted and mechanically fastened EPDM roof membrane can be recycled.

    EPDM can be installed as a ballasted, mechanically fastened or fully adhered system (see photos 1, 2 and 3). In my opinion, ballasted systems offer the greatest sustainability and energy-conservation potential. The majority of systems being installed today are fully adhered. Ballast lost its popularity when wind codes raised the concern of ballast coming off the roof in high-wind events. However, Clinton, Ohio-based RICOWI has observed through inspection that ballasted roofs performed well even in hurricane-prone locations when properly designed (see ANSI-SPRI RP4).

    PHOTOS: HUTCHINSON DESIGN GROUP LTD

    Pages: 1 2 3

PIMA Report: Effect of Roof Traffic and Moisture on Roof Insulations

The Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association (PIMA) released a research report suggesting that low-slope roofs using popular single-ply roof coverings may not be suitable for the use of mineral fiber (also known as mineral wool or rock wool) board insulation when subject to roof traffic and/or moisture accumulation.

The PIMA report titled “The Effect of Roof Traffic and Moisture on Roof Insulations,” was developed as a follow-up to previous research studies from Europe that evaluated the performance of mineral fiber subjected to a combination of simulated roof traffic and increased roof moisture content. The study suggests that moisture vapor may significantly reduce the compressive strength of mineral fiber insulation leading to a significant increase in overall roofing failures.

The research report concludes that:

  • After exposure to 95 percent humidity for 48 hours, single-ply roofing assemblies installed over two different types of rigid mineral fiber board insulation lost over 85 percent of their initial compressive strength when tested for only five cycles of a walkability test, recently developed in Europe to evaluate the effects of roof traffic on roofing systems.
  • Based on this observed loss of compressive strength, all of the roofing assemblies tested were rated as “Not Suitable” for roof traffic using a classification protocol developed in conjunction with the walkability test.
  • The reduction in walkability observed in this testing was slightly mitigated by increasing the thickness of the single-ply roof covering, but the benefit appeared to be minimal.

“It is well-known that moisture may collect inside roofing systems either from internal condensation or from external leaks,” says Jared Blum, president of PIMA. “As a consequence, the presence of water vapor inside roofing assemblies may be relatively commonplace. The data from this study, combined with prior work done in Europe, suggest that moisture vapor may significantly reduce the compressive strength of mineral fiber insulation. As a consequence, great care should be taken when using mineral fiber insulation if any significant level of roof traffic and/or internal moisture is anticipated.”

A copy of the research report, “The Effect of Roof Traffic and Moisture on Roof Insulations” is available for download at PIMA’s website and is also available from PIMA members.

SFS intec Receives FM Approvals Certificate for Induction Welding System

SFS intec received an FM Approvals Class 4470 Certificate of Compliance from FM Approvals for isoweld.

SFS intec received an FM Approvals Class 4470 Certificate of Compliance from FM Approvals for its induction welding system, isoweld.

SFS intec, Wyomissing, Pa., has recently received an FM Approvals Class 4470 Certificate of Compliance from FM Approvals, part of FM Global, for isoweld. isoweld is SFS intec’s induction welding system. This certificate approves use of isoweld for attachment of thermoplastic single-ply membranes (PVC and TPO) within roofing systems offered by several single-ply membrane original equipment manufacturers (OEMS).

SPRI Bulletin Addresses Code Evaluations for Roofing Products

Waltham, Mass.-based SPRI’s latest informational Bulletin (No. 1-15) updates building code officials, specifiers, building owners and others on code evaluations and product approval requirements for roofing products. The bulletin centers on the requirements of the international codes as they relate to membrane roof covering systems. SPRI represents sheet membrane and component suppliers to the commercial roofing industry.

The bulletin is designed to update building code officials and members of the International Code Council (ICC) on the various ways roofing manufacturers can provide evidence of code compliance. The bulletin considers products that are referenced in the code, as well as new and innovative roofing products and assemblies. The SPRI Bulletin zeroes in on some practical options available to the building official or Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ).

In Bulletin No. 1-15, SPRI points out that Research Reports are not mandatory for single-ply roofing membranes that comply with standards referenced in the codes. Research Reports from approved sources are intended to assist in the approval of materials or assemblies not specifically provided for in the code. Therefore, the AHJ should not insist on a Research Report for a membrane roof system if the manufacturer has data available for the AHJ to review.

“Code officials are increasingly asking for a Research Report from single-ply roofing manufacturers to demonstrate code compliance,” says SPRI member Michael Beaton of Intertek, a global provider of product certification and performance-testing services. “While a research report should not be mandated since these products and systems are described in the code with specific requirements and referenced standards, a Research Report is an easy way for the manufacturer to provide the necessary information to the code official.

“SPRI’s ultimate goal in publishing Bulletin 1-15 is two-fold,” Beaton continues. “First, that code officials understand that a Research Report is a ‘convenience’ for single-ply roofing and should not be required if other relevant data is available. Second, that when the roofing manufacturer does choose to document compliance in a Research Report, code officials should be willing to accept a Research Report from an agency other than ICC Evaluation Service, provided the agency is accredited for this activity.”

SPRI Bulletin No. 1-15 is two-pages long and available for free viewing and download.

Standing-seam Roof Resists Wind Uplift in Harsh Environments

Garland’s new R-Mer Shield structural standing-seam roof system boasts a 2-inch-high vertical seam with an extruded aluminum clip and top rail system that provide wind-uplift performance, ensuring watertight protection in the harshest environments.

Garland’s new R-Mer Shield structural standing-seam roof system boasts a 2-inch-high vertical seam with an extruded aluminum clip and top rail system that provide wind-uplift performance, ensuring watertight protection in the harshest environments.

Garland’s new R-Mer Shield structural standing-seam roof system boasts a 2-inch-high vertical seam with an extruded aluminum clip and top rail system that provide wind-uplift performance, ensuring watertight protection in the harshest environments. Its symmetrically designed panel and cap allows for easy installation and provides flexibility during multiple phases of new construction, replacement or retrofit. The metal roof system can span over open purlins on slopes down to 1/4:12, making it suitable for retrofits over existing single-ply, built-up, modified bitumen and metal roof systems. The system design also provides a 1/2-inch clearance between the panel and substrate to increase ventilation beneath the panel.

Thin-film PV Provides Greater than 16 Percent Cell Efficiency

MiaSolé has made available its second-generation FLEX Series Modules.

MiaSolé has made available its second-generation FLEX Series Modules.

MiaSolé has made available its second-generation FLEX Series Modules. The CIGS-based flexible thin-film PV modules provide greater than 16 percent cell efficiency for many types of roof applications. FLEX-02W module is 39 by 102 inches, rated at 360 watts and designed for low-slope commercial single-ply roof systems. FLEX-02N module is 14.6 by 102 inches, rated at 120W and designed for standing-seam metal roofs. Both modules bond to the roof surface with a simple peel-and-stick adhesive, which eliminates the need for racking and reduces labor and logistics costs. The FLEX-02 Series modules are IEC 61646, IEC 61730 and UL 1703 certified.

GAF Plans to Open PVC Manufacturing Line in Cedar City, Utah

GAF announced plans to open a PVC manufacturing line at its commercial roofing plant in Cedar City, Utah. The line, which GAF expects to become operational as early as mid-2016, will transform the Cedar City operation into a full-service manufacturer and supplier of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) single-ply membranes, as well as polyisocyanurate (ISO) insulation.

GAF also announced that it is actively considering locations for an additional plant in the eastern U.S. that will manufacture PVC, TPO and ISO. Known for its flexibility, ease of application and chemical resistance, PVC remains a single-ply solution among commercial roofing contractors.

“The Cedar City PVC line will strengthen GAF’s position as a full-service supplier of PVC, TPO and ISO. By manufacturing all three products at Cedar City and soon on the east coast, we will deliver economies of scale to our operations and quality service to our customers. This investment demonstrates our continued commitment to growth and leadership in the low-slope roofing market,” says Bob Tafaro, president and CEO of GAF.

“GAF is poised to leverage our track record of innovation and operational excellence. We’re ready to bring to the PVC market the same ingenuity and manufacturing expertise that have helped us to manufacture best-in-class TPO products.”