SES Foam Wall Insulation Products Use Honeywell’s Low Global-Warming Material

Honeywell has announced that SES Foam has transitioned to Honeywell’s low global-warming-potential (GWP) material for wall insulation, with roofing systems to follow.

SES has introduced a 2.0 closed-cell spray polyurethane foam (ccSPF) formulated with Honeywell’s Solstice Liquid Blowing Agent (LBA) for use in wall insulation applications. SES joins a list of companies that have switched from hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) foam blowing agents such as HFC-365mfc and HFC-245fa to Solstice LBA in ccSPF systems, well ahead of environmental regulations calling for a phaseout of HFCs due to their high GWPs. More than 190 countries recently agreed to an amendment to the Montreal Protocol that would phase down the use of HFCs beginning in 2019.

Solstice LBA, which is based on next-generation hydrofluoro-olefin (HFO) technology, complies with changing regulatory requirements aimed at reducing climate impact, while also providing improved foam performance compared to HFCs. Blowing agents are an important ingredient in closed-cell foam, allowing it to expand and enabling its insulating performance.

“SES is proud of its commitment to sustainable solutions and innovation,” said Charles Valentine, chief operating officer, SES Foam. “Having built our open-cell foam business around sucrose-based technology, we believe that adopting Honeywell’s Solstice LBA in our closed-cell foam aligns with our customers and environmental focus. Our expertise is unique in that many of our staff are former spray foam contractors, so they have insight into customers’ needs, and can provide the support and products they require to succeed.”

“Honeywell is committed to helping industry leaders like SES create solutions such as using Solstice LBA in its closed-cell foam,” said Laura Reinhard, global business manager for spray foam, Honeywell. “Not only does Solstice LBA provide SES with an environmental solution, it has helped their 2.0 product formulation deliver foam performance.”  

Solstice LBA has a low global-warming-potential of 1, which is 99.9 percent lower than HFCs and equal to carbon dioxide. It is nonflammable (ASTM E-681) and is not a volatile organic compound per the EPA. Solstice LBA is listed under the EPA’s Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program. In Europe, it is not listed in the Annex I of F-Gas regulation and thus not considered an F-Gas. It is also registered under the European Union’s REACH program.
 
Solstice LBA is used in a variety of rigid foam insulation applications, including spray foam insulation, residential and commercial refrigeration equipment, and insulated metal panels, as well as flexible foam applications, such as molded and slabstock foam, and integral skin. Visit the website for more information on Solstice LBA.

XPSA Supports Montreal Protocol Amendment Accelerating HFC Phase-Out

The Extruded Polystyrene Foam Association (XPSA) , whose members include the major extruded polystyrene foam (XPS) insulation manufacturers in North America, has announced its support for the Montreal Protocol amendment hastening the global phase-down of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) to protect the stratospheric ozone and mitigate the effects of climate change.
 
XPSA has expressed support for both the Montreal Protocol and the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program, under which XPS manufacturers are transitioning out of using HFC-134a. XPS manufacturers have met or exceeded the timelines set forth and will continue to do so based on science and environmental stewardship. XPSA’s members are committed to eliminating HFCs from their products by the EPA SNAP deadline of January 1, 2021.
 
“The phase-out of HFCs will be a milestone within the XPS industry’s stewardship and sustainability objectives and a progression of our ongoing search for technology improvements to better serve our customers and protect our environment,” said John Ferraro, executive director of XPSA.
 
Replacing HFC-134a requires a reconsideration of the entire chemical makeup of XPS insulation products. The EPA understands that XPS manufacturers need time to identify alternatives to HFC-134a; assess and address risks of alternative components; analyze capabilities and make modifications to equipment, facilities, manufacturing processes, and worker safety and training programs; work with suppliers on equipment and component needs; build and engage in pilot- and plant-scale trials; obtain permits, approvals, and financing; and address commercialization issues such as ensuring production capacity to meet global market demand.
 
XPS’s properties heighten a structure’s energy efficiency, which both the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and EPA acknowledge to be one of the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction strategies. In fact, ASHREA and XPS industry estimates indicate that homes using XPS insulation sheathing save enough energy in the first year to heat over 500,000 homes in the U.S. XPS reduces GHG emissions by lowering the energy consumption of a structure, which diminishes the amount of energy spent in the distribution of energy, the delivery of which requires 3.34 units of energy to send 1 unit to a building for user consumption. Environmental Product Declaration (EPD) data shows that the reduced energy consumption due to XPS foam pays back the embedded CO2 multiple times over the life of a building.

ICP Adhesives & Sealants Inc. Adopts Honeywell’s Solstice GBA

Honeywell has announced that ICP Adhesives & Sealants Inc. will use Honeywell’s Solstice Gas Blowing Agent (GBA) in its Handi-Foam High Density roof repair kits.

“We are proud to be making a change that not only improves the performance of our products, but positively impacts the world,” says Stefan Gantenbein, president, ICP Adhesives & Sealants Inc. “In addition to these kits, we are transitioning to Solstice GBA in our one-component aerosol can products and will soon be introducing a low-pressure foam mining product.”

Solstice GBA is based on hydrofluoro-olefin (HFO) technology. It is a near drop-in replacement for HFC blowing agents such as HFC-134a, delivering performance with a lower climate impact.
             
“ICP’s conversion to Solstice GBA is a milestone in the global adoption of Honeywell’s low-GWP product platform,” says Laura Reinhard, global business manager for spray foam, Honeywell. “The launch by ICP demonstrates Solstice GBA’s comparable advantages for low-pressure foam applications.”

Prior versions of the Handi-Foam repair kits used HFC-134a blowing agent. According to Mojee Cline, vice-president technology, ICP Adhesives, “The switch to Solstice GBA has allowed us to achieve a compressive strength in these repair kits that match typical foam densities on roofs. This provides the toughness needed to handle foot traffic and the durability that contractors require.”

Handi-Foam roof repair kits provide thermal performance, a smooth surface that can be coated, and a shelf life of at least 12 months. They offer contractors an alternative to high-pressure spray foam for repairing foam roofs. Another feature of the new kits is Handi-Gun II, the latest in ICP’s spray gun technology, offering a variable speed trigger among other features.

Solstice GBA has low GWP of less than 1, more than 99.9 percent lower than HFCs and also lower than carbon dioxide. It is nonflammable (ASTM E-681 and EU A11) and is not a volatile organic compound per the Environmental Protection Agency. Solstice LBA is listed under the EPA’s Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program. In Europe, it is not listed in the Annex I of F-Gas regulation and thus not considered an F-Gas. Solstice GBA is registered under the European Union’s REACH program. Honeywell’s Solstice GBA manufacturing plant in Louisiana started up in May 2014.

Honeywell Challenges Spray Foam Insulation Contractors and Builders

Honeywell has announced that it will offer U.S. contractors and builders a chance to win prizes if they try spray foam systems that contain Honeywell’s Solstice Liquid Blowing Agent (LBA) as a key ingredient.

Honeywell’s promotion, “Hit A Foam Run” runs now through April 30, 2017. Participants can win prizes each month, and one grand prize winner will receive a trip for two to watch the stars of baseball play in Miami. Spray foam contractors and builders are encouraged to contact one of the spray foam companies participating in the promotion and offering closed-cell spray foam systems containing Solstice LBA. The list of companies offering spray foam systems formulated with Solstice LBA continues to grow.

Some of the systems are designated for wall insulation, others for roofing. Solstice LBA is a material that causes foam to expand and enables its insulating properties.

“We have feedback from many contractors who have already used the new systems,” said Laura Reinhard, global business manager, sprayfoam, Honeywell. “They are surprised that changing the blowing agent can have so many positive effects, such as thermal performance, increased yields, reduced clogging of the spray gun, and a smooth finish, among other improvements. They can experience improvements in foam performance with minimal adjustments to their existing equipment. We encourage contractors to ask their systems providers for spray foam made with Solstice LBA.”

Global regulators are moving to phase out higher-global-warming-potential (GWP) foam blowing agents, refrigerants and other materials based on hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) technology. Last year, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency published regulations that will phase out the use of many HFC blowing agents. The regulation, some of which becomes effective January 2017, will require manufacturers to discontinue use of many standard HFC blowing agents and blends in certain applications.

Solstice LBA, which is based on hydrofluoro-olefin (HFO) technology, has a GWP of 1, which is 99.9 percent lower than HFC blowing agents it replaces, and equal to carbon dioxide. It is non-ozone-depleting and nonflammable. Solstice LBA has received EPA approval under the Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program, and is volatile organic compound (VOC)-exempt per the EPA. It is also registered under the European Union’s REACH program. Honeywell’s Solstice LBA manufacturing plant in Louisiana started up in May 2014.

Adoption of Solstice products has resulted in the reduction of more than 30 million metric tons of greenhouse gases to date, equal to eliminating emissions from more than 6 million cars. 

Honeywell also manufactures Solstice Gas Blowing Agent, which replaces HFC-134a in low-pressure spray foam insulation, commercial appliance insulation and extruded polystyrene boardstock insulation for homes and buildings.

Solstice LBA is used in a variety of rigid foam insulation applications, including residential and commercial refrigeration equipment, spray foam insulation, and insulated metal panels, as well as flexible foam applications, such as molded and slabstock foam, and integral skin.

AWIP Uses Solstice LBA Insulation for Metal Panel Production

Honeywell has announced that All Weather Insulated Panels (AWIP) will transition panel production for commercial applications to insulating foam made with Honeywell’s Solstice Liquid Blowing Agent (LBA).

Solstice LBA, which is based on hydrofluoro-olefin (HFO) technology, is an ingredient in closed-cell foam, allowing it to expand and providing much of its insulating properties. Solstice LBA increases the thermal performance of processed polyurethane (PUR) and polyisocyanurate (PIR) foam in both continuous and discontinuous panel operations.

“The transition from HFC-245fa foam blowing agent to Solstice LBA will advance our insulated metal panel technology to further meet the growing energy, environmental and economic challenges facing the North American building industry,” said William Lowery, president, All Weather Insulated Panels. “We strive to provide products for today’s market conditions. These panels are aligned with evolving environmental regulations that call for an eventual phase-out of HFC blowing agents.”

Lowery added that Solstice LBA will make their panels efficient in terms of energy retention and help AWIP be prepared for the environmental standards that will go into effect in 2020. 
 
AWIP’s wall, roof and interior partition panels are used in a variety of commercial and industrial applications such as cold storage warehouses, wineries, coolers, freezers and food processing facilities, which require temperature-controlled environments. AWIP operates two continuous line manufacturing facilities in Vacaville, Calif. and Little Rock, Ark.

“We are pleased that AWIP has chosen Solstice LBA for its production of commercial panels,” said Patrick Clifford, global business manager for Honeywell’s foam blowing agents business. “Demand for Solstice LBA continues to accelerate as more insulation producers are seeing the advantages of our fourth-generation blowing agent.”

Solstice LBA is being adopted by insulation manufacturers worldwide to reduce their environmental footprint and comply with environmental and energy efficiency regulations. Adoption of Solstice products by Honeywell customers has resulted in the reduction of more than 30 million metric tons of greenhouse gases to-date, equal to eliminating emissions from more than six million cars. 

Solstice LBA has a global-warming-potential (GWP) of 1, which is 99.9 percent lower than hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and equal to carbon dioxide. It is nonflammable (ASTM E-681) and is not a volatile organic compound per U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It is listed under the U.S. EPA’s Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) Program and is also registered under the European Union’s REACH program.