The New Parkland Hospital Is Already a Dallas Landmark

Parkland Memorial Hospital is located on a 64-acre health care campus in Dallas. The 2.1 million-square-foot complex includes an 862-bed, full-service acute-care facility. Photos: Aerial Photography Inc.

When it was time to replace the Parkland Memorial Hospital — a Dallas, Texas, landmark constructed in 1954 that served as a safety-net facility for Dallas County for over half a century, and which held notoriety as the location where President Kennedy was rushed after being shot in 1963 — everyone recognized they would be undertaking a high-profile project. This became even more apparent when the plans for a new Parkland hospital were unveiled: a 2.1-million-square-foot, 17-story, state-of-the-art, 862-bed, full-service acute-care facility located on a 64-acre health care campus in the Southwest Medical District. The $1.33 billion project resulted in one of the largest health care facilities ever constructed as a single project.

Because of the scale of the new Parkland hospital project and the fact it was being funded with public dollars, a conservative and careful approach to the planning was paramount. A planning and construction team was assembled to tackle the mammoth project, which included two architecture firms — HDR Inc. and Corgan Inc. — and four large contracting firms — Balfour Beatty, Austin Commercial, H.J. Russell & Company and Azteca — that formed a joint partnership called BARA for the job. A “collaborative project delivery” model was adopted to keep all the stakeholders on the same page, which included the designation of a central “co-location” office where members of various involved firms could meet, collaborate and concur on direction. Numerous consultants were brought in, and through a careful planning process over a period of two years, designs, material specifications and additional partners were analyzed and selected.

At a cost of $1.33 billion, Parkland Memorial Hospital is one of the largest health care facilities ever constructed as a single project. A two-ply SBS-modified bitumen roofing system was chosen for its durability and longevity. Photos: Aerial Photography Inc.

Early in the planning process, SOPREMA’s local sales partner, Conner-Legrand Inc., was brought into material specifications discussions with the architects and contractors planning the project. The planning team recognized the importance of finding the “best roof they could put in place” for this critical environment that was designed to last for decades. After numerous rounds of careful vetting, a final qualified roofing system was chosen that fit that criteria: a SOPREMA-manufactured, high-performance, two-ply, SBS-modified bitumen roofing system.

“Consistency and reliability in the marketplace don’t develop overnight, and in the case of a project like the new Parkland hospital, everyone accounts for that,” says Luke Legrand of Conner-Legrand Inc. “You’re dealing with the most discerning audience you can imagine, and while it takes time to make decisions, the final choice of materials speaks volumes. The decision-makers wanted one reputable manufacturer that could provide everything from the primer to the cap sheet and offered a strong warranty, and not every manufacturer has the horizontal and vertical breadth to provide that. In this case, however, the planning team found what they were looking for in SOPREMA.”

Raising the Roof

The new hospital featured flat rooftops at multiple levels that all needed to be made watertight for decades to come. The roofing system needed to be designed in a way that accounted for a helipad, consistent rooftop traffic, extensive rooftop equipment, lightwells and various utility platforms. A lot stood in the way of Anchor Roofing, the installer, but the meticulous planning for the project meant that all contingencies had been considered by the time application of the waterproofing system began.

After installing insulation, a vapor barrier and SOPRABOARD, the Anchor Roofing team started on the two-ply roofing application. They first put down a layer of SOPRALENE Flam 180 SBS-modified bitumen base-ply membrane to provide waterproofing protection for the building. The various other tradespeople who needed to work on the rooftop could then go about their business, and any necessary repairs were made to the waterproofing base layer before a SOPRASTAR Flam SBS-modified bitumen reflective cap ply layer was installed on top. The chosen cap layer was not only functionally strong and long-lasting, but also white and highly reflective, providing energy savings and ultimately contributing to the hospital’s achievement of LEED Gold status from the U.S. Green Building Council.

The two-ply SBS-modified bitumen roofing construction was also chosen because the waterproofing system can be easily refreshed 25–30 years down the road to extend the roof’s lifecycle without a full tear-off. The foundation of the system can stay intact while the top layer is rejuvenated, giving the option for an additional warranty and ensuring the building is protected against the elements for another 20–30 years. This not only helps the health system to save money in the long run and avoid contributing unnecessary waste to landfills, but also helps the hospital avoid disruption to operations in a sensitive environment where recovering patients must be protected from invasive construction processes.

A Dallas Landmark

Throughout the course of construction, 162 professional staff members and 1,400 on-site workers collaborated to construct the new Parkland hospital. It was officially dedicated in March 2015, and patients and staff had all moved in by August. The facility now averages more than 1 million patient visits per year, with roughly 30,000 people traveling through its doors each day. The roof has performed well, and all stakeholders in the project have felt confident that the right waterproofing system for the job was chosen. Given the careful planning, beautiful design and strong material choices that went into the project, it has already received a number of awards and is well positioned to remain a Dallas icon for decades to come.

TEAM

Architects: HDR Inc., Dallas, Texas, www.HDRinc.com, and Corgan Inc., Dallas, www.corgan.com
General Contractor: BARA, a joint venture partnership formed by Balfour Beatty, Austin Commercial, H.J. Russell & Company and Azteca
Roofing Contractor: Anchor Roofing, Fort Worth, Texas, www.anchor-roofs.com

MATERIALS

Modified Bitumen Base Ply: SOPRALENE Flam 180 SBS, SOPREMA, www.soprema.us
Modified Bitumen Cap Sheet: SOPRASTAR Flam SBS, SOPREMA
Cover Board: SOPRABOARD, SOPREMA

Proper Storage and Handling of Polyiso Insulation

Photo: SOPREMA

Punxsutawney Phil certainly got it right this year; we have had six more weeks of winter — and then some — particularly in the Northeast. As winter turns to spring, building and repair projects which frequently involve the roof get underway. As you commence these new and re-roofing initiatives, here are a few key considerations about the storage and handling of polyiso roof insulation on a jobsite.

Storage

Polyiso insulation is typically shipped protected by a plastic wrap, plastic bag or both. This factory packaging is intended for handling the polyiso in the manufacturing plant and during transit; it should not be relied upon as protection at jobsites or other outdoor storage locations unless specified otherwise by the manufacturer.

Material delivery should be carefully coordinated with the roof application schedule to minimize outdoor storage. When short-term outdoor storage is necessary, whether at grade or on the roof deck, the following precautions should be observed:

  • Bundles should be stored flat above the ground utilizing included feet or on raised pallets. If possible, the bundles should be placed on a finished surface such as gravel, pavement, or concrete rather than on dirt or grass.
  • Unless specified otherwise by the manufacturer, cover the package and pallet with a waterproof cover, and secure to prevent wind displacement.

Note: Polyiso insulation is fully cured and fit for installation upon delivery. No additional storage time is required.

Handling

Photo: Johns Manville

Exercise care during handling of polyiso insulation to prevent breaking or crushing of the square edges and surfaces. Remove the polyiso bundles from trucks with proper equipment. Other means of mishandling, such as pushing pallets off the edge of the truck or “rolling” the pallet across the roof deck, must be avoided.

Product Application

Polyiso should always be installed on dry, clean roof decks in dry conditions. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations regarding product application to ensure performance to the intended design life of the roofing system. Apply only as much polyiso roof insulation as can be covered by completed roofing the same day.

Construction Traffic

Avoid excessive traffic during roof construction of or on a completed roof surface. Although polyiso has been designed to withstand limited foot traffic, protection from damage by construction traffic and/or abuse is extremely important. Roof surface protection such as plywood should be used in areas where storage and staging are planned and heavy or repeated traffic is anticipated during or after installation.

Photo: Johns Manville

Some designers and membrane manufacturers specify the use of cover boards as a means of protecting the insulation. If specified, installers should ensure the cover board used is compatible with all components of the roofing system, is acceptable to the membrane manufacturer, and meets specified fire, wind, and code requirements.

Polyiso roof insulation, like other roofing materials, requires a proper understanding of storage, handling, and application to result in a properly constructed roof system. To find additional information about the proper storage and handling of polyiso insulation and for more technical information on polyiso roof and wall insulation, please visit www.polyiso.org.

Soprema Adds Seventh U.S. Contractor Training Center at New Convoy Supply Facility

Soprema Inc. has expanded its comprehensive contractor training program by opening a new training center in Capitol Heights, Maryland. The new training center is located within a new 15,000-square-foot distribution facility operated by Convoy Supply Inc., a distributer of building envelope materials for the construction industry.

The new training center will offer courses covering product specifications and application for the full building envelope in a 1,350-square-foot classroom. The space will also be available to local contractors and architects for industry meetings and training sessions.

“We’re pleased to be expanding the reach of the SOPREMA contractor training program with our new Maryland location — our seventh training center in the U.S.,” said Curt Liscum, Technical Services Manager for Soprema. “We look forward to providing in-person education and hands-on product experience to contractors, consultants and architects at the Capitol Heights facility soon.”

“At SOPREMA, training and education are taken very seriously, and I’m glad that we can now offer our customers another convenient location specifically for this purpose,” explained Tim Kersey, Vice President and General Manager for SOPREMA. “With labor being the number one topic in our industry, we want contractors to feel comfortable and become proficient using our products. We also want designers to better understand our products and systems and feel comfortable specifying them, so we are committed to ensuring they have every opportunity to interact with and learn from us in person.”

More information on the SOPREMA training program can be found on the SOPREMA website at http://info.soprema.us/contractortrainingfaq.

Two-Component SPF Adhesive Designed to Provide More Coverage, Faster Flow Rate

DUOTACK SPFSoprema introduces a low-pressure, two-component spray polyurethane foam (SPF) adhesive to its DUOTACK family of roofing adhesive products. DUOTACK SPF was designed to provide quick, efficient adhesion of PVC membranes, insulation and coverboards to approved substrates. According to the manufacturer, the product was developed by Soprema chemists with vast knowledge and experience in the roofing and polyurethane foam industry to provide 50 percent more coverage and a faster flow rate than competing products. It also has usability in multiple applications without the need for extensive inventory and expensive equipment, like pace carts.

DUOTACK SPF is contained in a portable, easy-to-use disposable kit, and tank recycling programs are available locally to eliminate waste. Between the reduced equipment needs and the efficiencies gained from the increased gun flow rates and product yield, it offers the market a more time- and cost-effective means of reliably adhering roofing materials.

“DUOTACK SPF brings the proven performance of our DUOTACK polyurethane formulation to spray foam roofing applications,” explained Eric Younkin, Business Development Manager for Soprema. “This is not an insulation product forced into a roofing application, but rather a technology developed specifically based on deep knowledge of PVC properties, roofing applications and contractor needs. Users receive the strong properties of the DUOTACK line, but can complete jobs faster than ever due to the built-in efficiencies and simplicity of using this product.”

For more information, visit www.soprema.us.

Spray-Grade STPE Waterproofing Barrier Designed to Withstand Extreme Temperatures

COLPHENE LM BARR, spray-grade silyl terminated polyether (STPE) waterproofing membrane, is now available from SOPREMA. Ideal for use in positive-side waterproofing, foundation waterproofing and a variety of above-grade, horizontal waterproofing applications, this one-component, liquid-applied, moisture-curing elastomeric product can be applied in both vertical and horizontal applications quickly and easily with very minimal prep work.

COLPHENE LM BARR’s hybrid polyether composition combines the most desired features of multiple proven chemistries to deliver a broad range of desirable performance properties. It provides persistent adhesion to a wide range of materials—even “green” concrete—while demonstrating extremely high elongation properties. As a result, COLPHENE LM BARR forms tough, elastic seals capable of withstanding extreme temperatures, building movement and moisture without cracking or softening. This STPE product is also environmentally friendly with very low VOC content, cures quickly even at low temperatures.

For more information, visit www.soprema.us.

Chem Link Opens New Training Center

Chem Link has opened a new training center at which the company will offer in-person and virtual contractor education.

Located in Schoolcraft, Mich., the new 3,200-square-foot facility with a 540-square-foot classroom can be utilized for groups of up to 20 contractors, training on both Chem Link and SOPREMA products. Training takes place in a classroom setting featuring stations set up to provide customers with hands-on experience using these products. This experience is designed to teach and engage using written, hands-on application combined with training videos through Chem Link’s interactive media classroom.

“We are pleased to be able to offer our customers the chance to receive this type of product training,” explained Rocky Stroud, National Sales Manager, Chem Link. “Our new education facility means we can give contractors the firsthand experience they need to feel confident using our products in the field, and we can also provide virtual training to contractors in remote locations. It is a great opportunity to ensure customers can learn in the manner that suits them best.”

For more information, visit www.chemlink.com.

 

North Carolina Legislative Building Restoration Poses Unique Challenges

The North Carolina State Legislative Building was the site of a renovation project that included asbestos abatement in the interior and a complete restoration of the building’s roof systems.

The North Carolina State Legislative Building was the site of a renovation project that included asbestos abatement in the interior and a complete restoration of the building’s roof systems. Photos: SkySite Images

Some of the variables that can make a project difficult include a variety of complex, interconnected systems, unique design elements, and a tight schedule. These challenges are heightened on a highly visible, historic building, where the goal of keeping the design historically accurate must be balanced with making improvements to the structure and functionality of the systems. All of these elements and more were in play during the restoration of the one-of-a-kind roof on the North Carolina State Legislative Building in Raleigh, North Carolina. It took a talented team of design, engineering, and roofing professionals to bring the project to a successful conclusion.

Originally designed by architect Edward Durell Stone, the building has been the home of the state legislature since 1963, but water intrusion under its copper pyramids and at windows and doors on the promenade level precipitated a complete restoration project. Renovation work conducted in 2016 and 2017 included asbestos abatement in the interior and a complete restoration of the building’s roof systems.

The roofing phase of the project included removing and replacing the metal roof systems on the five copper-clad pyramids, as well as re-roofing the low-slope sections adjacent to the pyramids with a two-ply modified bitumen system. A liquid-applied waterproofing system was installed in the planter areas and under the pavers in the promenade section. The project also involved the removal and replacement of windows, doors, and skylights, as well as repairing and coating the concrete surfaces at the perimeter of the roof.

The design of the quilted flat lock copper panel system involved 17 different panel profiles. A false batten was added after the panels were in place.

The design of the quilted flat lock copper panel system involved 17 different panel profiles. A false batten was added after the panels were in place. Photos: SkySite Images

Companies involved in the project included Raymond Engineering, headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina, which provided engineering and architectural services; Owens Roofing Inc., also located in Raleigh, which served as the general contractor on the roofing phase of the project and installed the low-slope systems; and The Century Slate Company, headquartered in Durham, North Carolina, which removed and replaced the copper roofs on the five pyramids.

Some of the key players in the project shared their insights with Roofing, including John Willers, a senior engineer with Raymond Engineering; Bert Owens, president of Owens Roofing; and Mike Tenoever, president of Century Slate.

“This is an iconic state building with a unique roof system which the owner and designer required to be aesthetically replicated,” Tenoever notes. “At the same time, some functionality and technical improvements were incorporated. This is a very high-profile project with a lot of complexity, particularly given the schedule. There were a lot of details compressed into a very short period of time.”

Design and Pre-Construction

Raymond Engineering conducted testing on the existing roofs and specified systems designed to match the originals and provide some necessary improvements, including added insulation and ventilation under the pyramids. Willers worked closely with Jason Mobraten, the senior architect on the project. “We provided the engineering and architectural services, beginning with design and then assisting with bidding and managing the construction phase of this project,” says Willers. “We engineered the copper roof, all of the detailing for the modified asphalt roof, and the detailing for the drainage, the pavers, and the sealants for the promenade.”

Crews from Owens Roofing removed the existing plants, media and drainage system from four 42-foot-by-42-foot fixed planters with skylights. After the substrate was cleaned and primed, a liquid-applied waterproofing system was installed.

Crews from Owens Roofing removed the existing plants, media and drainage system from four 42-foot-by-42-foot fixed planters with skylights. After the substrate was cleaned and primed, a liquid-applied waterproofing system was installed. Photos: SkySite Images

The schedule was an obvious challenge, as the majority of the work had to be completed while the legislature was in recess, and there were substantial financial penalties that would come into play if the work was not completed on time. “The client also required that the asbestos abatement be completed before re-roofing the copper-clad pyramids to avoid the risk of dislodging the asbestos-containing textured ceiling finish. However, doing the work in two phases allowed the asbestos contractor to get started while the rest of the job was designed and bid,” Willers states.

The building houses legislators’ offices, and it was open and occupied during construction, with the exception of the areas undergoing asbestos abatement. The schedule had to be carefully adjusted as the job progressed. “In addition to our role in monitoring the technical aspects of the construction, we closely monitored the construction phasing and sequencing, as it was directly driven by the schedule of the state legislature,” Willers notes. “We had to take a lot of care in developing the schedule and monitoring it.”

Willers and Mobraten knew that the details on this project would be crucial. “There were previously some issues where the copper and the low-slope membrane roofs met,” Willers says. “We detailed that very carefully so that we had redundancy in keeping that watertight.”

Extensive mock-ups of the copper pyramids were constructed and tested to ensure the quilted pattern could be exactly replicated while avoiding the leaks that plagued the existing structure.

Photos: SkySite Images

Photos: SkySite Images

As designers looked for ways to improve construction, they explored the design and construction of the quilted panels. “From a design standpoint, we wondered why we had this odd diamond-shaped pattern,” Willers recalls. “After we played with the dimensions a bit, we realized that if you fly over the building, from above all of those diamond sections look like squares.”

The key was to replicate the design with its false battens while avoiding leaks. “We were concerned about how to detail out the joining of the copper sheets that formed the diamond-shaped panels,” Willers says. “What had been done was susceptible to windblown rain getting in. We did two things differently: the little clips that supported these battens were secured by forming the clips with hooks that would be integral with the single-locked seams and soldering the clips to the top surface of the copper panels. Previously they were held in place by pop rivets, which went through the copper.”

The Secrets of the Pyramids

Century Slate was well prepared to tackle the copper roofing on the project. The company has been in business more than 20 years, and it specializes in historic restoration projects including slate, tile, wood, copper and other historical metals.

Crews from Century Slate removed the existing copper panels. The copper was salvaged and recycled.

Crews from Century Slate removed the existing copper panels. The copper was salvaged and recycled. Photos: SkySite Images

Tenoever knew the design of the original quilted flat lock copper panel system needed to be replicated exactly. “There were 17 different panel profiles, each within a very particular location within the roof’s quilted pattern,” Tenoever notes. “Proper placement of each different profile was essential to the whole system working correctly and looking like the original.”

The first step was to remove the existing copper roofs. “We tore off the entire system down to the deck,” Tenoever explains. “We then installed a semi permeable a vapor barrier, insulation, and a vapor retarder.”

Along with added insulation and Carlisle WIP 300HT self-adhering underlayment, crews also installed a vented nail base from Hunter Panels. “The Hunter Cool-Vent is a vented nail base that gets screwed down,” Tenoever says. “The goal was to have a breathable air cavity. All of the hip caps are actually vented to allow the air to get out.”

With the addition of the insulation and nail base, the roof was built up approximately 6 inches from the previous configuration. This added height necessitated changes in the custom flashing at the base of the pyramids but did not change the configuration of the copper panels.

In all, 22,500 square feet of copper panels fabricated by K&M Sheet Metal in Durham were installed. Each of the 17 different panels was labeled with a letter code. “When they were out at the site, we could just grab an A panel or a B panel, as needed, and bring them to that layout,” Tenoever explains. “Four of the pyramids were the same, and the center one was different, as that was the one that had skylights built into it.”

The areas between the pyramids were covered with a two-ply modified bitumen roofing system. Photos: SkySite Images

The panels feature flat-lock clips that were screwed down to the nail base. “It’s a typical flat seam panel system, and the panels interlock together,” says Tenoever. “You can see the batten panel above it, which is an aesthetic feature. The battens and the clips that held them were amazingly intricate, for what they were. They were cut out with a CNC machine and soldered onto the copper panels prior to installation. Later we came back and installed the batten system over the top.”

Century Slate built new curbs in the center pyramid for the new skylights, which were manufactured by Wasco. “The skylights were one of the last things to go on,” says Tenoever. “They were custom made because even though they look square, there isn’t a square angle on them.”

Custom copper flashings were installed at the bases. “One of the trickier parts for us probably would have been the tie-in of the modified roof, because Owens Roofing had to do their bit, and we were also replacing all of the wood blocking and everything all along the bottom edge before we could put our flashing on,” Tenoever recalls. “It took a lot of coordination between the two trades, but it all worked out.”

The Low-Slope Roof Systems

Owens Roofing served as the general contractor on the project and installed the low-slope roof systems. The company was established in 1986 in Raleigh, and focuses on commercial and institutional buildings, almost exclusively re-roofing. Much of its work is on historic buildings, so Owens was confident he could execute the project and complete it on schedule.

A scaffolding system offered secure roof access, but material had to be loaded and removed from one access point, so logistics had to be carefully mapped out.

A scaffolding system offered secure roof access, but material had to be loaded and removed from one access point, so logistics had to be carefully mapped out. Photos: SkySite Images

Crews from Owens Roofing installed 18,900 square feet of modified bitumen roofing from Soprema over concrete decks, including the areas between the pyramids. Tapered polyiso and half-inch DEXcell cover board from National Gypsum were installed using Duotack adhesive, followed by the two plies of modified bitumen membrane.

A liquid waterproofing system from Sika was specified for the large planter areas. Crews from Owens Roofing removed the existing plants, media and drainage system from four 42-foot-by-42-foot fixed planters with skylights. After the substrate had been cleaned and primed, the Sika RoofPro system was installed.

“Once it’s cleaned and primed, it’s pretty simple,” says Owens. “The product is one part, and you don’t even have to mix it. We applied it with rollers on this project. You embed fabric sheets in the system and then topcoat it. It was a cold-weather job, but fortunately we caught a break last winter in that it wasn’t as cold as usual, and we didn’t miss as much time as we might have.”

The 30,000-square-foot promenade section was originally covered by white granite pavers native to North Carolina. The old pavers were removed and replaced over a new roof system, which was comprised of modified bitumen sheets beneath the liquid-applied waterproofing system. “The concrete deck was primed and a modified bitumen base ply heat welded to the deck,” Owens explains. “This surface was primed in preparation for the Roof Pro system, which was then installed.”

Innovative Roof Services of Raleigh was called in to conduct a high-voltage electrical testing to ensure there were no voids in the system before the pavers were re-installed. The pavers had originally been set in a bed of mortar, and they had to be removed and cleaned, which revealed a problem. “When we took the pavers up, we found out that they ranged between 1-1/8 and 1-3/4 inches thick,” Owens notes. “That wasn’t a problem when they were set in a bed of mortar, but over extruded polystyrene, they would have been all up and down. We put in a change order and had the pavers set in a bed of sand on top of one layer polystyrene.” The sand was adjusted by hand to ensure the pavers were level. New pavers were added to replace those broken over the years.

On the roof’s concrete eyebrows, damaged areas of concrete were repaired, joints were sealed, and a cold-applied waterproofing system from Sika Sarnafil was used to cover 8,800 square feet of concrete.

Numerous Challenges

Important considerations on the project included safety and logistics, as well as the tight schedule. Safety was paramount, and a third-party safety monitor was on the site to ensure the safety plan was designed and executed properly. During the time between when the original skylights were removed and when their replacements installed, the voids in the roof deck needed to be cordoned off and covered according to OSHA regulations. Personal fall arrest systems were used on the pyramids and outside of the safety perimeter, which was marked with flags. “With the promenade, you had a wide concrete eyebrow, so it made it easier to set up the safety lines and keep everyone safely away from the edge,” Owens notes.

This aerial photo taken before the restoration project shows the copper roofs with their green patina. Photos: SkySite Images

“Safety is a key concern as on all jobs, but this one in particular was highly visible out the windows of the nearby Department of Labor,” Owens continues. “We were paid a courtesy visit and agreed with them that an on-site safety meeting conducted by their personnel might be useful. The owner allowed us use of one of their auditoriums and we had a very productive half-day meeting for all trades. Every week we had a meeting with a state construction monitor.”

A scaffolding system was set up that offered secure roof access, but there was only one point for loading and unloading material, so logistics at the site were a concern. “We had to use wheelbarrows and roof carts to transport materials back and forth to the scaffolding tower,” Tenoever notes. “Between the removal of the original roof and the installation of the multiple layers of the new roof system, over 150,000 square feet of roofing materials were moved by hand over an average distance of approximately 200 feet.”

Loading and unloading added another wrinkle to the complicated schedule. “The schedule was based on when the legislature was scheduled to come back to town—not how long the job was supposed to take,” Owens says. “We were all concerned with the ambitious time frame and $1,000 a day liquidated damages included with this job.”

Willers cited excellent communication as one of the keys to completing the project on time. “Fortunately, the project managers for the general contractor and other trades were highly organized individuals,” Willers says. “Regular site meetings were detailed and thorough. Although setbacks did occur, communication kept the ball rolling.”

The roof system on the building’s iconic copper clad pyramids was removed and carefully recreated, matching the original design while adding a vented cavity and increasing the thermal insulation. Photos: SkySite Images

A Unique Experience

Copper removed from the existing roof was salvaged and recycled, notes Willers, with the exception of a few pieces that

were cut into the shape of the state of North Carolina to serve as mementos of the unique project. “We’re very proud of the design and the outcome—and the assistance we got from all of the contractors involved,” Willers says. “We had some pretty heavy rains after the project was completed, including some high winds, and there were no leaks.”

Tenoever also looks back on the project with pride. “A one-of-a-kind roof system was custom built and delivered on schedule and with the owner and designer’s praises,” he says. “Taking something so amazing and restoring it to the beauty it originally had—we all get a kick out of that.”

TEAM

Design and Engineering Services: Raymond Engineering, Raleigh, North Carolina, RaymondLLC.com
General Contractor: Owens Roofing Inc., Raleigh, North Carolina
Metal Roofing Contractor: The Century Slate Company, Durham, North Carolina, CenturySlate.com
Leak Testing: Innovative Roof Services, LLC, Raleigh, North Carolina, IRS-LLC.net

MATERIALS

Metal Roof System
Copper: 20-ounce copper sheet metal
Vented Nail Base: Hunter Cool-Vent, Hunter Panels, HunterPanels.com
Underlayment: Carlisle WIP 300HT, Carlisle, Carlislewipproducts.com
Skylights: Wasco Skylights, Wascoskylights.com

Modified Bitumen Membrane Roof System

Membrane: Sopralene Flam 180 and Sopralene Flam 180 FR GR, Soprema, Soprema.us
Adhesive: Duotack, Soprema
Insulation: Sopra-Iso, Soprema
Cover Board: DEXcell, National Gypsum, NationalGypsum.com

Waterproofing System

Liquid Applied Membrane: RoofPro 641, Sika Corp., USA.Sika.com
Reinforcing Fabric: Reemat, Sika Corp.
Primer: Sikalastic EP Primer/Sealer
Extruded Polystyrene Insulation: Foamular 604, Owens Corning, OwensCorning.com

Low-Odor, Single-Component Adhesive Is Solvent Free

Soprema offers COLPLY EF adhesiveSoprema offers COLPLY EF adhesive, a low-odor, single-component polymer modified membrane adhesive specifically formulated for Soprema sand-surfaced SBS-modified bitumen plies. COLPLY EF can be applied without fear of negatively affecting building occupants, and upon curing, it provides additional layers of elastomeric waterproofing protection between plies.

According to the company, Soprema’s prefabricated SBS-modified bitumen membranes provide ease of application and flexibility for the installer, accommodating various application methods, including heat welding, cold adhesives, self-adhesive, mechanical fastening, and hot asphalt. Zero-VOC COLPLY EF adhesive is designed to allow multiply protection for highly sensitive applications, offering a non-hazardous and flameless solution. It is a safe alternative for buildings that require uninterrupted operations as occupants go about their daily routines during construction.

“We developed COLPLY to be the zero-VOC, single-component product installers need to do tough, sensitive jobs,” explained Matt Davis, product manager at Soprema. “It allows buildings with vulnerable populations like schools and hospitals to gain an additional layer of elastomeric waterproofing protection without concern for effects of odors or other chemical compounds on bystanders.”

Soprema Appoints Northern Illinois Sales Representative

Soprema Inc. has appointed Michael McClay, a five-year member of the Soprema business development team, as a dedicated sales representative for the Northern Illinois region.

“Michael brings to the Northern Illinois region not only a strong track record as a sales representative who is knowledgeable about Soprema’s products and services, but a strong understanding of building science and how customers can achieve lasting positive results,” said Jeff Valentine, district sales manager at Soprema. “I am confident our customers in the area will enjoy working with Michael and will find his expertise valuable as they design and construct buildings built to last.”

McClay is a graduate of Illinois State University with a degree in Construction Management. According to the company, McClay brings a strong background in general waterproofing, below-grade applications, liquids and wall systems to the job. He is also an active participant in many local and industry associations including AIA and RCI. Michael regularly draws upon his areas of expertise to educate architects, consultants, contractors and building owners on proper building design and waterproofing techniques, and he looks forward to continuing to educate the community in his new role.

Soprema to Host Building Envelope Clinic in New York

Soprema Inc. will be hosting a regional Building Envelope Clinic in New York on Oct. 10, 2017, for architects, consultants and contractors looking to further their knowledge, network and earn continuing education units. The clinic will be held at AIA New York, located at 536 LaGuardia Pl., New York, NY 10012.

The Building Envelope Clinic will begin at 9:00 a.m. and conclude at 3:30 p.m. with a cocktail reception and prize raffle.

“We’re proud to be offering these clinics regionally to help support our consultants, contractors and architects,” said Sara Jonas of Soprema. “These courses continue to bring education to the forefront for our current partners, as well as those new to Soprema, while helping them to achieve credits to keep their accreditations.”

Courses offered during the Building Envelope Clinic include:

  • SBS-Modified Bitumen Technology –AIA/RCI Accredited
  • Wall Systems & Design – AIA/RCI Accredited
  • Below Grade Waterproofing Systems & Design – AIA/RCI Accredited
  • Vegetated Roofing Systems – AIA/RCI Accredited
  • PMMA/PMA Liquid Applied Membranes
  • For more information and to RSVP, click here.