Spray Polyurethane Foam Has Structure-strengthening and Energy-efficiency Capabilities

A high-performance building material, spray polyurethane foam (SPF) is widely used as an effective, lasting roofing solution. With positive benefits, including versatility, thermal insulation, resistance to inclement weather cycling and storms, strengthening of the building envelope, long life span and durability, spray foam has enjoyed increased use among builders and roofing contractors alike.

A roof’s primary purpose is to protect the structure underneath it. As a roofing material, closed-cell SPF acts as a protective roofing mechanism and a thermal insulator. The lightweight material is ideal as a roofing solution when:

 As a roofing material, closed-cell SPF acts as a protective roofing mechanism and a thermal insulator.

As a roofing material, closed-cell SPF acts as a protective roofing mechanism and a thermal insulator.

  • the roof substrate has many penetrations.
  • the roof deck is an unusual shape or configuration.
  • the roof is being applied to a structure located in a severe-weather environment.
  • a lightweight option is needed.
  • a slope application is preferred to provide extra drainage capabilities.
  • keeping the existing roof cover is desired.

STRENGTH AND DURABILITY

SPF is considered a highly durable building material. The physical properties of the foam change little with time, accounting for a life span up to 30 years with regular care and maintenance. SPF roofing systems also strengthen the roof in multiple ways. Roofing spray foams possess a compressive strength of 40 to more than 60 pounds per inch. Spray foam’s adhesion strengthening capabilities are key, especially in locations where severe weather cycling, storms, wind, hail and other conditions are prevalent and commonly cause structure damage. Coastal and hurricane-prone regions are prime examples.

When applied to the interior side of a roof, closed-cell SPF can increase a building’s resistance to wind uplift during severe storms. When SPF is applied to built-up roofing and metal substrates, it increases resistance to wind uplift even further. A study conducted by the University of Florida, Gainesville, in 2007 found that applying closed-cell spray foam under a roof deck provides up to three times the resistance to wind uplift for wood roof sheathing panels when compared to a conventionally fastened roof.

Spray foam is a good solution for unusual configurations and areas with many penetrations.

Spray foam is a good solution for unusual configurations and areas with many penetrations.

Spray foam also is resistant to progressive peeling failure. Caused by wind, peeling happens at the roof’s edges when wind pulls flashings and copings away from their installed positions. Peeling looks like a tin can after it has been cut around the perimeter. When this happens, a chain reaction may occur and lead to catastrophic building failure. After the roof membrane, panels or tiles pull away, the board-stock insulation is exposed, often with less resistance to the lateral and uplift wind forces. Then the sheathing below and the substructure are subject to movement and wind or water damage, potentially leaving the entire building interior underneath open and vulnerable. SPF roofing is continuous, so it provides a water-resistant layer that is well adhered to the substrate.

When the Gaithersburg, Md.-based National Institute of Standards and Technology examined roofs following Hurricane Katrina, it found buildings with spray-foam roofs performed rather well without blow-off of the SPF or damage to flashings. The 2006 “Performance of Physical Structures in Hurricane Katrina and Hurricane Rita: A Reconnaissance Report” found that only one of the examined SPF roofs incurred notable damage, and that damage was confined to only 1 percent of the total roof system. The report concluded spray foam kept the roofs intact, prevented moisture from entering the buildings, and protected the structures from hail and debris.

Hurricane Katrina played a significant role in one of the largest reroofing projects ever on one of the largest metal-framed domed structures in the world: the Superdome in New Orleans. Katrina destroyed the dome’s second roof; the structure’s original roof was constructed with polyisocyanurate foam covered with a fluid-applied elastomeric coating but was replaced in 1989 with a single-ply EPDM roofing system. After the damages suffered during Katrina, the EPDM roof system was replaced with a spray foam roof system.

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Global Spray Polyurethane Foam Market Expected to Grow

According to a new market report published by Transparency Market Research, “Spray Polyurethane Foam (Open-Cell, Closed-Cell and Others) Market for Residential Walls, Residential Roofing, Commercial Walls, Commercial Roofing and Other Applications – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2013 – 2019,” the global spray polyurethane foam market was valued at USD 1,135.3 million in 2012 and is expected to reach USD 1,823 million by 2019, growing at a CAGR of 7.0 percent from 2013-19. In terms of volume, spray polyurethane foam consumption was 473.5 kilo tons in 2012.

Spray polyurethane foam (SPF) is an effective substitute for traditional insulation materials. Higher efficiency and lower carbon footprint during production have been major factors driving the SPF market. In addition, increasing threat of energy crisis leading to stringent government regulations for energy-efficient structures is expected to further augment the market growth. Isocyanates employed in the production of SPF cause severe occupational health hazards including asthma which has been a major factor restraining growth of the SPF market. Volatility of raw material prices has also restrained the demand for SPF. Developing low cost bio-based SPF is expected to offer huge growth opportunities in the market.

Open-cell and closed-cell SPF together constitute over 90 percent of the global demand for SPF and the trend is expected to continue during the forecast period. Growing demand for residential applications in developed countries is expected to fuel demand for open-cell SPF. Other application segments include one component foam and high density SPF. Demand in other segment is driven by innovation and higher degree of customization.

Demand for SPF can be segregated into five major application segments: residential roofing, residential walls, commercial roofing, commercial wall and other niche applications. Residential roofing application dominates the global demand for SPF. Other application segments include medical equipment and transportation, among others.

North America followed by Asia Pacific dominates the global demand for SPF. Increasing industrial investment mainly in the developing economies of Asia Pacific is expected to drive demand for closed-cell SPF. Europe is expected to be the fastest growing region for SPF market during the forecast period. Stringent government regulations are expected to drive SPF market in the developed economies of North America and Europe.

Some of the major industry participants include BASF Corporation, Lapolla Industries Inc., NCFI Polyurethanes, Bayer MaterialScience, Icynene Inc., Premium Spray Products, CertainTeed Corporation, Rhino Linings Corporation, The Dow Chemical Company and Demilec among others.

This report segments the global spray polyurethane foam market as follows:

Spray Polyurethane Foam Market – Product Segment Analysis

    Open Cell
    Closed Cell
    Others (Including high density spray polyurethane foam, one component foam, etc.)

Spray Polyurethane Foam Market – Application Analysis

    Residential walls
    Residential roofing
    Commercial walls
    Commercial roofing
    Others (Including Medical, Telecom, Transportation, etc.)

Spray Polyurethane Foam Market – Regional Analysis

    North America
    Europe
    Asia Pacific
    Rest of the World