Metal Construction Association Honors Champions of the Metal Construction Industry

The Metal Construction Association (MCA) is proud to announce the winners for its 2016 Triumph Awards, an award created to honor the people and companies that champion the metal construction industry each year. The annual MCA Triumph Awards honors individuals and organizations throughout the metal construction industry in six categories.  The 2016 award winners are:

    Industry Champion of the Year Awards:
    Scott Kriner, MCA and Brian Partyka, Drexel Metals Inc.

    With 35 years experience in the metal construction industry, Scott Kriner’s career started with Bethlehem Steel and research on hot dip coatings, which then led to international licensing of Galvalume intellectual property, to pretreatments, to paints, and involvement in multiple trade associations, including MCA. He started his own consulting business in 2006 to catch the green wave, which according to him was the scariest thing he ever did.  For the past thirteen years he has served as technical director for MCA on staff and more recently as consultant.

    During this time he has led or participated on the development of industry papers and studies, including ones that have had an impact on the entire industry.

    Brian Partyka is a 21-year veteran of the metal construction industry, working with Drexel Metals Inc. from its early days. He is an elected member of the Executive Committee of MCA. He chairs the Market Development Committee, Statistics Committee, Co-chairs of the Codes and Standards Committee and sits on multiple task groups to help drive and advance growth for the metal construction industry. He is a board member of the Metal Roofing Alliance and sits on NRCA’s Industry Advisory Board (National Roofing Contractors Association) as well as the CEO Advisory Council for the Central Bucks Chamber of Commerce and multiple board seats for small local businesses. 

    Partyka has published and contributed to technical trade-articles and white papers relating to metal building products.  He teaches about sustainable design and the use of metal to reduce heat gain for industrial, commercial and residential structures. He is the inventor of the Drexmet Paint Pen in 2001, an air-dry Kynar touch up system.

    Media Executive / Journalist of the Year Award:
    Shawn Zuver, Bob Fittro, John Garvey of DesignandBuildwithMetal.com

    Recognizing both a need and an opportunity for the metal construction industry to increase its visibility to an online audience, three industry media veterans, Bob Fittro, Shawn Zuver and John Garvey, pooled their talents and resources in 2007 to launch a new company, Unlimited Reach Media Inc. , and a new website, DesignandBuildwithMetal.com.

    DesignandBuildwithMetal.com is updated daily to be a current source of metal construction industry news and information for the design community, contractors, metal construction industry professionals, and building owners. The website features over 1,500 projects, showcasing virtually every use for metal construction products, categorized by both building type and design application. Visitors will also find thousands of industry news items, hundreds of columns by leading market segment experts, and a wide range of related resources about metal products.

    In addition to the continually evolving website, DesignandBuildwithMetal.com is recognized for its weekly newsletter, delivered to nearly 28,000 email inboxes every week, and for its monthly e-zines, which were introduced in 2008.

    Corporate / Individual Citizen of the Year Award:
    PSMJ, Resources Inc.

    For the last 14 years PSMJ Resources Inc., producers of METALCON, has spent many hours coordinating fund raising before, during and after each METALCON show, as well as donating to local organizations on the behalf of the metal industry.

    Among those organizations:  Homes for Our Troops, Tampa, Baltimore and Las Vegas; Habitat for Humanity, Washington, DC and Chicago; The Journey, 2day Walk for Breast Cancer, Atlanta; Canstruction, Tampa; Carmen House, Foster Home for Kids, Rome, Ga.; The Spring, Tampa; Home for Battered Women in Indiana; and scholarships to  Purdue University, Chicago and Emily Griffith Vocational School, Denver.

    Each contribution allowed METALCON to leave behind an impact in each venue where METALCON was held.

    Young Movers and Shakers Awards:
    Jonathan Rider of D.I. Roof Seamers; Dustin Haddock of S-5!; Josey Parks of Metal Roofs of Texas; Mark Bus of ATAS International Inc.

    Jonathan Rider serves as the Chief Administrative Officer of Developmental Industries, the parent company of D.I. Roof Seamers. The third generation of this family-owned business, he plays a role in the metal roofing industry by servicing clients in the areas of engineering, product development and component manufacturing. His experience, collaborative leadership style, and years of working closely within the industry have positioned him for this role.  Rider is active in community organizations and volunteer efforts and currently serves in various roles within the industry, including: MCA Accessories Council Co-Chairman and member of the MBMA Associate Member Advisory Council. He is also the author of multiple industrial publications and travels frequently speaking at events across the United States.

    At the age of 27, Josey Parks is a multi-faceted entrepreneur, owning several companies with different specialties including J Wales Enterprises, which includes Metal Roofs of Texas, J Wales Construction, Designer Glass Specialties, and Think Unlimited. He is one of the youngest recipients of the Inc. 5000 award. He also received an award for unprecedented nationwide sales of Interlock Roofing, a distributor within the state of Texas. Technology plays a role in his strategy. By developing and leveraging software to facilitate smart business growth, he has streamlined the value of his team’s sales efforts.

    Parks serves as an educator of business owners in the Dallas/Fort Worth and as a mentor to employees. He has been featured on television shows like CNBC’s “Blue Collar Millionaire”, and a guest speaker at national conferences like Corporate Millionaire Minds and Vistage Executive Summit, and is a recurring guest on “One Life Radio”.

    Mark Bus is the national sales manager for ATAS International Inc. Bus has earned the respect of his national sales team as well as his peers and management. He brings his knowledge of industry initiatives and association activities into his daily communication with staff and customers. His next phase of growth will be an increased presence in the industry associations on a national level. Bus’ customer base has realized his value and expertise as evident from the following statement from customer, Allan Brock, Brock Associates LLC: “During my forty year tenure in the commercial metal roofing and siding industry, I have rarely crossed paths with a young professional as competent as Mark Bus. As a long term ATAS distributor, I have seen Mark successfully evolve from an inside technical salesperson, to a regional product representative, to management. At each level, he radiated professionalism along with product and technical knowledge. He developed many exceptional relationships with architects leading to ATAS specifications generating increased sales for distributors such as myself.”

    Dustin Haddock was 8 years old when he worked his first job, packaging S-5! clamps, one of the few his age with 20 years of experience. During this time he has developed over 40 new products and has filed and secured numerous patents. Haddock has worked for the Metal Roof Innovations division of S-5! since 2006, where he has contributed to International Code and Standard groups to draft test methods to receive German code acceptance. He also has worked with the University of Adelaide in drafting performance test methods for use of standing seam clamps within cyclonic regions of Australia. Further, he has worked with the Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) Roofing Work Group in the United Kingdom to develop standards relating to rooftop mounted PV. Within the US he has worked with the ICC to develop an evaluation for standing seam-clamping systems. Haddock serves on the UL 2703 and 1703 Standard Technical Panels and has developed the first draft of the “PV Racking and Attachment Criteria for Effective Low Slope Metal Panel Roof System Integration”. Haddocks has also served on the Board of Directors 2013-2016, is currently the Chairman of the UL Non-Combustible Roof Group and the Chairman of the Mounting Systems Manufacturers Committee (MSMC) at SEIA.

    Sales Person of The Year Award:
    Donn Couch, SFS intec Inc.

    Donn Couch of SFS intec Inc. has been awarded the sales person of the year award. A seasoned veteran with SFS for 38 years, his customers know him to have a buyer focus, as he has developed personal relationships with many of his customers. Over his tenure with SFS, he has developed an extensive product and application knowledge. He has been the recipient of several awards within the SFS organization over the years, which has included highest sales volume, highest percent increase sales over prior year, and outstanding achievement award. He is respected amongst his peers as well as the metal building industry.
     
    Entrepreneur of The Year Award:
    Oded Shemla, iRoofing

    Oded Shemla  is CEO of Applosophy, the mobile app entrepreneurial enterprise that created iRoofing. iRoofing has developed an all-inclusive suite of technical tools for roofing and siding contractors designed to help increase efficiency, productivity and closing ratios, while reducing costs, and increasing profitability through the use of technology. iRoofing continues to develop tools and capabilities for manufacturers and contractors to grow their business. In the past five years iRoofing has grown from a concept to currently providing an evolving solution for thousands of contractor users and manufacturers of building products across the US, Canada and the Caribbean. Shemla has spent 6 years as CEO of Applosophy, located in New York.  Prior to this he was the president and owner of My Roof Tile, a roofing distribution business located in Florida. Shemla gained his technology expertise while serving in the Israeli Air Force.

Nominations for the 2017 MCA Triumph Awards are open to anyone in the metal construction, metal building, metal roofing and metal erection industry. Nominations can be made on the MCA or METALCON websites. Winners for 2017 will be voted on and selected by the MCA members and members of other metal construction related trade groups by popular vote.

The awards will be presented at a marquee event designed to celebrate honorees at METALCON 2017 in Las Vegas. The event will feature live entertainment and dinner at the Westgate Hotel on Oct. 18, the opening night of the show. Tickets will go on sale when registration opens. Sponsorships are available.

The idea for the commendation was initiated by Keith Lipps, Vice President of Marketing and Sales from MCA Member Company, S-5!.

“So many people do great things everyday at various levels in their career using many different skill sets, and it’s their achievements that make this industry thrive,” says Lipps. “We want to celebrate these contributions because it’s everyone working together that makes us strong.”

Arkema Inc. Provides Guidelines to Estimate Topcoat Color Fade

Arkema Inc. presented recommended guidelines for estimating the color fade of PVDF-based topcoats for bright color architectural restoration and protective coating applications at the SSPC 2017 Conference in Tampa, Fla.

This year’s SSPC Conference served as an international forum at which contractors, consultants, inspectors, engineers, paint/equipment manufacturers and structure/facility owners exchanged research and technologies in the coatings industry. The event’s GreenCOAT technical program emphasized innovations, the latest advances in eco-conscious coating technology and developments for complying with green regulations.

Many common topcoat standards used for architectural and protective coating applications include a durability requirement based on the accelerated weathering performance of a white coating. However, there are currently no standards for field-applied coatings that address the needs of specifiers who want to ensure color performance in high-chroma (saturated or bright) colors.
 
Dr. Kurt Wood, a principal scientist in Arkema’s Fluoropolymers R&D Division, reviewed data for coatings made using a range of pigment chemistries, enabling estimates of color lifetime to be made for virtually any color, if one stays within the particular resin chemistry space. These principles were demonstrated with PVDF-based topcoats, where it was found that both the pigment grades and the resin are important factors for determining the color lifetime, along with the pigment volume concentration.   

Court Ruling Allows Continued Development of Public Health and Safety Standards

The United States District Court for the District of Columbia (Hon. Tanya S. Chutkan) has issued a ruling that will support federal, state and local governments’ efforts to support public health and safety through the use of voluntary consensus codes and standards. The court granted a motion for summary judgment filed by a number of standard development organizations (SDOs), including the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), ASTM International and ASHRAE. The court’s ruling permanently enjoins Public.Resource.org from its previous systematic infringement of numerous SDO copyrighted codes and standards. The ruling vindicates the longstanding public-private partnership pursuant to which government entities may, if they choose, incorporate by reference high quality safety codes and standards.

“We are pleased with the court’s decision, which recognizes the importance of a time-tested process that serves governments and individuals well and is vital to public health and safety,” says Jim Pauley, president of NFPA.

The history of not-for-profit SDOs developing voluntary consensus standards goes back more than a century. Governments, businesses, and individuals across the country rely on a variety of works, from product specifications and installation methods to safety codes and standards.  SDOs, not governmental agencies, underwrite the costs of developing standards.
 
“The court’s ruling means federal, state and local agencies can continue to rely on not-for-profit SDOs to develop voluntary consensus standards at a high level of excellence and at minimal cost to government,” says Kathie Morgan, president, ASTM International.

SDOs pay for the standard development process and invest in new standards with the money earned selling and licensing their copyrighted works.  This model allows SDOs to remain independent of special interests and to develop up-to-date standards.  It also allows the U.S. government, and governments at all levels, the freedom to decide whether to incorporate these standards by reference without a drain on their resources.
 
“We and many other SDOs already provide free online access to many standards as part of our commitment to safety,” says Timothy G. Wentz, ASHRAE president. “And, preventing the infringement of copyrighted material will allow not-for-profit SDOs to continue meeting the needs of the people and jurisdictions we serve.”
 
For more information about this issue visit the website.

Green Span Profiles Receives Uplift Resistance Approval for Metal Roofing Panels

Green Span Profiles has received UL 580 Class 90 Approval for wind uplift for its RidgeLine insulated metal roofing panel.

UL 580 is the Standard for Tests for Uplift Resistance of Roof Assemblies. Roof assemblies are tested for their ability to resist both external and internal pressures associated with high velocity winds.

RidgeLine is a patented 2-3/8-inch tall mechanically seamed roofing panel covering 42 inches, with thickness options of 2.5, 3, 4, 5 and 6 inches. The core is a continuously poured-in-place, polyisocyanurate insulating foam. Exterior and interior metal panels are available in 26-, 24- and 22-gauge Galvalume steel. Exterior finish is standard gloss PVDF coating. RidgeLine panels can be used on slopes as low as 1/2:12 and are available in standard lengths measuring 12 to 53 feet, with custom lengths available on demand. Green Span Profile’s UL construction number is 698.

“This is great news for Green Span Profiles, our installers and their customers,” says Brian N. Jaks, P.E., vice president of sales and marketing at Green Span Profiles. “By meeting UL 580 Class 90, RidgeLine meets the standards of the International Building Code for installation in high velocity wind areas. UL certification adds another level of scrutiny to our manufacturing process. Underwriter’s Laboratories requires independent, quarterly QC audits to maintain certification.”

Attributes of RidgeLine:
· Single component installation
· Slides together; no rolling or lifting to engage the sidelap
· Continuous weathertight seal at the sidelap means no interruptions at the clips
· Factory-applied sealant in the batten cap
· Bi-directional mechanical seaming equipment
· Proprietary shoulder fastener, co-developed with Atlas Bolt & Screw, to prevent over-driving
· Nominal R-8 per inch of insulation thickness; R-20 for 2.5-inch panel

NIBS States Proposed ABA Resolution to Make Codes and Standards Free Could Reduce Safety

The National Institute of Building Sciences issued an open letter to delegates attending the American Bar Association (ABA) Annual Meeting in August informing of the potential impacts if they vote to support a proposed resolution. The resolution—which advocates that copyrighted codes and standards incorporated by reference in legislation and regulation be made available for free—would alter the way codes and standards are developed in the United States.

In the U.S. construction industry alone, there are hundreds of copyrighted codes and standards that impact everything from seismic requirements and wind loads to water use and life safety. The standards developing organizations (SDOs) that develop these codes and standards have thousands of members, employees and volunteers that participate in the process to incorporate best practices and lessons learned to improve the standards. Each industry, from aeronautics and agricultural to electronics and telecommunications, has a similar structure and industry participation to address their specific needs. Such standards improve safety, drive innovation and improve commerce, both domestically and around the world.

The U.S. Government recognizes the benefit of private industry standards development, as directed by the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (NTTAA, P.L. 104-113) and Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-119.

If the ABA’s suggested resolution and related advocacy campaign is successful, private-sector-developed standards would be subject to new requirements due to their incorporation by reference in legislation and regulation, and the ability for SDOs to recoup development costs would change considerably.

The development of codes and standards is expensive. Today, the cost is born by those who are ultimately impacted by the standards (whether by participating in the process or purchasing the resulting document). By making such information free online, the ABA resolution would hamper cost recovery through such mechanisms. The result would be that private-sector organizations may no longer be able to invest in the development process, leaving existing standards to remain stagnant (and thus inhibiting innovation) and shifting the responsibility (and expense) of developing future standards to the government.

ABA’s proposed resolution attempts to mitigate any copyright concerns by encouraging government agencies to negotiate licenses with SDOs. However, this change would require agencies to hire staff and implement contracting mechanisms, making it necessary for tax payers to cover the cost of standards development.

The National Institute of Building Sciences—which was established by the U.S. Congress to work with both the public and private sectors to advance building science and the design, construction and operations of buildings to meet national goals of health, safety and welfare—is extremely concerned that the ABA is advocating a one-size-fits-all legislative vehicle that will alter the long-standing tradition of private-sector-developed standards in the United States. The result could reduce safety, increase costs and add a burden to the government and tax-paying citizens.

In lieu of moving forward with the resolution, the Institute suggests the ABA focus on engaging in a meaningful dialogue with the SDO community to help address the changing nature of access to copyrighted materials through the internet and other electronic sources, and, after taking the long-term goals and impacts into consideration, identify a mutually acceptable path forward.

Read the letter.

The Building Industry Is Working to Reduce Long-term Costs and Limit Disruptions of Extreme Events

“Resilience is the ability to prepare for and adapt to changing conditions and to withstand and recover rapidly from deliberate attacks, accidents, or naturally occurring threats or incidents.” —White House Presidential Policy Directive on Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience

In August 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall in the Gulf Coast as a category 3 storm. Insured losses topped $41 billion, the costliest U.S. catastrophe in the history of the industry. Studies following the storm indicated that lax enforcement of building codes had significantly increased the number and severity of claims and structural losses. Researchers at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, found that if stronger building codes had been in place, wind damages from Hurricane Katrina would have been reduced by a staggering 80 percent. With one storm, resiliency went from a post-event adjective to a global movement calling for better preparation, response and recovery—not if but when the next major disaster strikes.

CHALLENGES OF AN AGING INFRASTRUCTURE

We can all agree that the U.S. building stock and infrastructure are old and woefully unprepared for climatic events, which will occur in the years ahead. Moving forward, engineering has to be more focused on risk management; historical weather patterns don’t matter because the past is no longer a reliable map for future building-code requirements. On community-wide and building-specific levels, conscientious groups are creating plans to deal with robust weather, climatic events and national security threats through changing codes and standards to improve their capacity to withstand, absorb and recover from stress.

Improvements to infrastructure resiliency, whether they are called risk-management strategies, extreme-weather preparedness or climate-change adaptation, can help a region bounce back quickly from the next storm at considerably less cost. Two years ago, leading groups in America’s design and construction industry issued an Industry Statement on Resiliency, which stated: “We recognize that natural and manmade hazards pose an increasing threat to the safety of the public and the vitality of our nation. Aging infrastructure and disasters result in unacceptable losses of life and property, straining our nation’s ability to respond in a timely and efficient manner. We further recognize that contemporary planning, building materials, and design, construction and operational techniques can make our communities more resilient to these threats.”

With these principles in mind, there has been a coordinated effort to revolutionize building standards to respond to higher demands.

STRENGTHENING BUILDING STANDARDS

Resiliency begins with ensuring that buildings are constructed and renovated in accordance with modern building codes and designed to evolve with change in the built and natural environment. In addition to protecting the lives of occupants, buildings that are designed for resilience can rapidly re-cover from a disruptive event, allowing continuity of operations that can liter- ally save lives.

Disasters are expensive to respond to, but much of the destruction can be prevented with cost-effective mitigation features and advanced planning. A 2005 study funded by the Washington, D.C.-based Federal Emergency Management Agency and conducted by the Washington-based National Institute of Building Sciences’ Multi-hazard Mitigation Council found that every dollar spent on mitigation would save $4 in losses. Improved building-code requirements during the past decade have been the single, unifying force in driving high-performing and more resilient building envelopes, especially in states that have taken the initiative to extend these requirements to existing buildings.

MITIGATION IS COST-EFFECTIVE IN THE LONG TERM

In California, there is an oft-repeated saying that “earthquakes don’t kill people, buildings do.” Second only to Alaska in frequency of earthquakes and with a much higher population density, California has made seismic-code upgrades a priority, even in the face of financial constraints. Last year, Los Angeles passed an ambitious bill requiring 15,000 buildings and homes to be retrofitted to meet modern codes. Without the changes, a major earth- quake could seriously damage the city’s economic viability: Large swaths of housing could be destroyed, commercial areas could become uninhabitable and the city would face an uphill battle to regain its economic footing. As L.A. City Councilman Gil Cedillo said, “Why are we waiting for an earthquake and then committed to spending billions of dollars, when we can spend millions of dollars before the earthquake, avoid the trauma, avoid the loss of afford- able housing and do so in a preemptive manner that costs us less?”

This preemptive strategy has been adopted in response to other threats, as well. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J., emerged as a national example of electrical resilience with its microgrid, an efficient on-campus power-generation and -delivery network that draws electricity from a gas-turbine generator and solar-panel field. When the New Jersey utility grid went down in the storm, police, firefighters, paramedics and other emergency-services workers used Princeton University as a staging ground and charging station for phones and equipment. It also served as a haven for local residents whose homes lost power. Even absent a major storm, the system provides cost efficiency, reduced environmental impact and the opportunity to use renewable energy, making the initial investment a smart one.

ROOFING STANDARDS ADAPT TO MEET DEMANDS

Many of today’s sustainable roofing standards were developed in response to severe weather events. Wind-design standards across the U.S. were bolstered after Hurricane Andrew in 1992 with minimum design wind speeds rising by 30-plus mph. Coastal jurisdictions, such as Miami-Dade County, went even further with the development of wind- borne debris standards and enhanced uplift design testing. Severe heat waves and brown-outs, such as the Chicago Heat Wave of 1995, prompted that city to require cool roofs on the city’s buildings.

Hurricane Sandy fostered innovation by demonstrating that when buildings are isolated from the supply of fresh water and electricity, roofs could serve an important role in keeping building occupants safe and secure. Locating power and water sources on rooftops would have maintained emergency lighting and water supplies when storm surges threatened systems located in basement utility areas. Thermally efficient roofs could have helped keep buildings more habitable until heating and cooling plants were put back into service.

In response to these changes, there are many opportunities for industry growth and adaptation. Roof designs must continue to evolve to accommodate the increasing presence of solar panels, small wind turbines and electrical equipment moved from basements, in addition to increasing snow and water loads on top of buildings. Potential energy disruptions demand greater insulation and window performance to create a habitable interior environment in the critical early hours and days after a climate event. Roofing product manufacturers will work more closely with the contractor community to ensure that roofing installation practices maximize product performance and that products are tested appropriately for in-situ behavior.

AVERTING FUTURE DISASTERS THROUGH PROACTIVE DESIGN

Rather than trying to do the minimum possible to meet requirements, building practitioners are “thinking beyond the code” to design structures built not just to withstand but to thrive in extreme circumstances. The Tampa, Fla.-based Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety has developed an enhanced set of engineering and building standards called FORTIFIED Home, which are designed to help strengthen new and existing homes through system-specific building upgrades to reduce damage from specific natural hazards. Research on roofing materials is ongoing to find systems rigorous enough to withstand hail, UV radiation, temperature fluctuations and wind uplift. New techniques to improve roof installation quality and performance will require more training for roofing contractors and more engagement by manufacturers on the installation of their products to optimize value.

Confronted with growing exposure to disruptive events, the building industry is working cooperatively to meet the challenge of designing solutions that provide superior performance in changing circumstances to reduce long-term costs and limit disruptions. Achieving such integration requires active collaboration among building team members to improve the design process and incorporate new materials and technologies, resulting in high-performing structures that are durable, cost- and resource-efficient, and resilient so when the next disruptive event hits, our buildings and occupants will be ready.

The Roofing Industry Seeks to Protect Buildings from Storms

I used to love storms. I was never one to cower at the sound of thunder. I often found storms a good excuse to turn off the TV and lights, open the blinds and marvel at the sheer power of nature. If you read my January/February “Raise the Roof”, however, you know I have had a love-hate relationship with rain since moving in with my husband (we married in August 2015). I found myself awake on rainy nights, counting the seconds between pumps of our sump
pump. If less than 20 seconds passed, I knew the basement was flooding and dreaded the morning’s cleanup. (I work from home and my office is in the basement.)

In March, a waterproofing company spent two days installing its patented drain- age system and a new sump pump inside our basement. We monitored the system throughout the month of April, which was rainy, to ensure there were no leaks in the system. It worked like a charm! During April, we also hired contractors to create my new home office, a guestroom and walk-in closet within the basement. So far, we have new windows, lighting and insulation; the contractors are finishing up drywall and ceiling installation as I type.

I know what it’s like when you can’t trust your house to weather a storm. There’s nothing worse than feeling powerless, and seeing your belongings destroyed is gut-wrenching. As the nation braces against another summer of intense weather, it’s comforting to know the construction industry—specifically roofing—is researching and innovating to protect people’s homes and businesses from Mother Nature’s wrath.

For example, in “Business Sense”, Jared O. Blum, president of the Washington, D.C.-based Polyisocyanurate Insulation Manufacturers Association, writes about initiatives to improve the resiliency of our building stock and infrastructure through codes, standards and proactive design.

The Clinton, Ohio-based Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues Inc., better known as RICOWI, recently sent 30 researchers to the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex after an April hailstorm. According to Joan Cook, RICOWI’s executive director, the 10 teams of three inspected 3 million square feet of low and steep-slope roofing during the investigation. The teams’ findings will result in a report to help the industry better understand what causes roofs to perform or fail in severe hail events, leading to overall improvements in roof system durability. Learn how RICOWI mobilizes and studies roofs in “Special Report”.

There are many other stories within this issue about roof systems working along- side other building components to create durable, sustainable and energy-efficient buildings. Humans have a long history of innovating and evolving to meet the needs of their current situation. I have no doubt that in my lifetime our buildings will be built to withstand nearly any catastrophic event. Meanwhile, I’m happy to report we received 4 1/2 inches of rain in three hours last week and our basement remained bone dry. Thanks to innovations in basement waterproofing, I may start to enjoy storms just a bit again!

Roofing and Waterproofing Committee Presents Award of Merit

ASTM International’s Committee on Roofing and Waterproofing (D08) presents its annual award – the Award of Merit – to Aaron Phillips of TAMKO Building Products Inc. in Joplin, Missouri. The Award of Merit is ASTM’s highest recognition for individual contributions to developing standards.

The committee honors Phillips for outstanding leadership, personal commitment, and participation in many subcommittees and task groups with dedication to developing standards. He has been a member of ASTM since 1991, serving as the D08 committee chairman from 2007 to 2013. He received the Distinguished Leadership Award in 2012 and the Award of Appreciation in both 2008 and 2014.

Phillips is the corporate director of technical systems at TAMKO Building Products Inc. and has been with the company since 2009, having previously served as a research assistant and technical systems specialist.

In addition to ASTM, Phillips is a member of the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association, Composite Lumber Manufacturers Association, the Metal Construction Association, the Roof Coatings Manufacturers Association, Canadian Standards Association, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

You Can Influence Codes and Standards

As associate executive director of the Washington, D.C.-based EPDM Roofing Association (ERA), I focus a great deal of my time and energy on the codes and standards that regulate or guide the roofing business. In the current environment, driven by constant upgrades in technology, as well as the need to save energy, these codes—and the standards that often inform them—seem to be undergoing steady revision. Believe it or not—and the word “geek” does come to mind—I find participating in this process extremely interesting. In fact, following and sometimes influencing emerging codes and standards is among the most important responsibilities of my job.

I’ll be the first to admit that a detailed review of a standards manual is probably not anyone’s idea of exciting reading. But given the importance of codes and standards to the construction industry, we ignore them at our own risk.

For a start, what’s the difference between a code and a standard? Ask enough people in the roofing industry and you will get a variety of answers. But generally, codes are the “top-tier” documents, providing a set of rules that specify the minimum acceptable level of safety for manufactured, fabricated or constructed objects. They frequently have been enacted into local laws or ordinances and noncompliance can result in legal action. Standards, on the other hand, establish engineering or technical requirements for products, practices, methods or operations. They literally provide the nuts and bolts of meeting code requirements. If codes tell you what you have to do, standards tell you how to do it. Frequently, standards—especially “voluntary consensus standards”—are the precursors for what becomes law years down the road.

ERA has represented the manufacturers of EPDM roofing for more than a decade. Through the years, we have learned the importance of interfacing with standard-setting and regulatory bodies. One of our first, and most important, learning experiences was working with the Northeast and mid-Atlantic states when they issued regulations designed to achieve federally mandated air-quality standards. (See the article in Roofing’s September/October 2014 issue, page 58.) The initial regulations, which lowered the amount of VOCs in many roofing products, were based on those used in southern California and incorporated provisions that were effective in the climactic and market conditions of that state. But states in the affected areas, from Virginia to Maine, confronted a situation where the new regulations threatened to bring the roofing industry to a sudden halt. In some instances, no adhesives and sealants were available to meet the new standards. And the new products, when they became available, would need to be effective in very cold climates totally unlike those on the West Coast.

ERA worked with officials throughout the impacted areas, helping to create “phase-in” schedules that would give industry enough time to develop products to meet the new standards. In state after state, the local regulators welcomed our input. Our point-of-view was based on a deep understanding of the business needs of our industry. Just as important, we understood the science behind the proposed regulations and could work with the regulatory bodies to ensure the air-quality needs and the needs of the roofing industry were met.

This experience has informed our ongoing approach to code-setting and regulatory bodies. Since our work with the states setting VOC standards, we have invested staff time and resources to stay current with and even ahead of proposals that would impact our members and their customers. We have testified before the South Coast Air Quality Management District in California on its proposal to limit VOCs. ERA has organized an ad-hoc coalition to successfully oppose an unnecessarily stringent proposal to require reflective roofs in the Denver area. And our organization is currently providing input to Atlanta-based ASHRAE’s efforts to clarify its regulation regarding air leakage. This issue—of great importance to the roofing industry—relates to other work being done in ASHRAE working groups and subcommittees on thermal bridging, as well as the definition of walls and wall assemblies. ASHRAE has convened an “Air Leakage Work Group” whose charge is to review the pertinent sections of Standard 90.1 and make recommendations for revising it. ERA staff will be present at this group’s meetings and will once again provide input based on the expertise of our members.

When I work with code-setting and regulatory groups, I am reminded of that very familiar saying, “It’s not whether you win or lose, it’s how you play the game.” Based on our work at ERA, I’d like to revise that. Your skill at “playing the game” will definitely influence whether you win or lose. Our experience tells us that staying involved with regulatory groups and providing them with input based on firm science and field experience leads to a winning outcome for the roofing business.

Increased Thermal Values Affect an Existing Roof Edge

Recent code and standard development has resulted in increased thermal insulation. This increase has required greater and greater insulation thicknesses, which are even thicker when
tapered insulation is added. This roof system thickness, especially in reroofing design, has thrown a curveball to many designers: How should they address existing rooftop conditions?

On a recent project in which the roof sustained a wind event, investigation for the design of the new roof edge and system found multiple concerns: open metal stud cavities to the parapet, open metal panel joints, wood and substrate boards attached with drywall wall screws and moisture drive concerns. This information led to the design of one of the author’s most complicated roof edges.

Photo 1: On a recent project in which the roof sustained a wind event, investigation for the design of the new roof edge and system found multiple concerns: open metal stud cavities to the parapet, open metal panel joints, wood and substrate boards attached with drywall wall screws and moisture drive concerns. This information led to the design of one of the author’s most complicated roof edges (see Figure 1).

I have successfully dealt with this for more than three decades and mostly with ease. However, based on the fight being put up by the Chicago Roofing Contractors Association (CRCA), you would think it is putting contractors out of business rather than having the potential to increase their bottom lines.

Consequently, this will be the first of several articles discussing how designers can deal with existing conditions on the roof when increased thermal values are required. This article will explain the roof edge—the first defense against wind uplift and often an aesthetic concern. Future topics will include drains, roof curbs, access doors, windows, RTUs and plumbing vents.

WHY THE NEED

Twenty-five or 30 years ago, insulation was what you placed on the roof deck to act as a separator between the roof cover and roof deck, especially with the increased use of fluted steel decks instead of monolithic-type decks, like concrete, gypsum, wood and cementitious wood fiber. Prior to that, roof covers were often placed directly on these monolithic roof decks sans insulation.

On a recent project in which the roof sustained a wind event, investigation for the design of the new roof edge and system found multiple concerns: open metal stud cavities to the parapet, open metal panel joints, wood and substrate boards attached with drywall wall screws and moisture drive concerns. This information led to the design of one of the author’s most complicated roof edges.

Figure 1: On a recent project in which the roof sustained a wind event, investigation for the design of the new roof edge and system found multiple concerns: open metal stud cavities to the parapet, open metal panel joints, wood and substrate boards attached with drywall wall screws and moisture drive concerns. This information led to the design of one of the author’s most complicated roof edges (see Photo 1).

It has only been within the last 25 to 30 years that insulation has become an integral component of the roof system, often changing how the roof cover behaved. As energy and the conservation of energy became vogue, codes and standards became more stringent in regard to thermal insulation values. With the increase in R-value came an increase in the thickness of insulation. This in turn requires roof edges be higher to accommodate the increases in insulation, ultimately changing how the roof edge on buildings without parapets are designed.

Stacking wood to raise the roof edge is old school. Here you can see the new wood blocking is the second stacking over previously installed wood on a previous reroof.

Photo 2: Stacking wood to raise the roof edge is old school. Here you can see the new wood blocking is the second stacking over previously installed wood on a previous reroof.

The use of tapered insulation with thicknesses often above 12 inches changed how the roof edge is treated, especially in reroofing situations, which has resulted in design challenges. Add to this, modern building design that forewent parapets for gravel stop; the challenge of raising the roof edge to accommodate new insulation heights has dramatically increased.

The Washington, D.C.-based American Institute of Architects has issued a challenge to the design community to make all new construction Zero Energy Buildings (buildings that produce as much energy as they use) by 2030. Intuitively, more insulation (and perhaps fewer windows) will result in a building that uses less energy and, thus, more easily achieves a balance point.

To strengthen the multiple stacks of 2xs, 3/4-inch plywood is being added on the exterior.

Photo 3: To strengthen the multiple stacks of 2xs, 3/4-inch plywood is being added on the exterior.

This altruistic, far-reaching goal is being fought. CRCA, for example, is fighting the new code increases in roof insulation. Although the organization states a variety of reasons, it appears that the fear of owners delaying work that costs more because of increased insulation thickness is the greatest concern. This is interesting because design—by state mandate—is the purvey of licensed design professionals. Is the CRCA advocating design by non-licensed designers? I believe the CRCA’s position is foolish. Why would a predominately union-based contractor organization fight a code mandate that allows their members to increase profits? Perhaps the challenge by “right to work contractors” is greater than believed.

CONCERNS: LEGITIMATE OR NOT

There are a number of concerns, or design challenges, as I like to say, to raising the roof edge. For us architects, respecting the architect’s vision and design intent is often in conflict with what may need to be accomplished. I have worked with clients in buildings of note, designed by well-known architects, and have been able to respect every detail of the roof-edge vision. It is very difficult and challenging.

When stacking, wood joints should be offset and scarfed at 45 degrees.

Photo 4: When stacking, wood joints should be offset and scarfed at 45 degrees.

Another concern can be cost. Historically, a dimensional 2x was set at the roof edge and nailed; now we often raise the roof edge with prefabricated insulated curbs. Costs are always a concern but when budgeted correctly and the client is informed during the process, the project has always been realized within a year or two.

Another concern I often hear voiced is, “It’s difficult” or “I cannot figure it out”. When one considers that the roof edge must be (let’s say should be) tied to the building structure to resist wind loads, these are true concerns. These types of conditions often call on years of experience. Therefore, I say the challenge is on!

On this detail from an older project, the roof edge is being raised with multiple layers of 2 by 12s—a bit old school but easily performed. It is recommended to not specify preservative- treated wood, coated screws and off-set joints.

Figure 2: On this detail from an older project, the roof edge is being raised with multiple layers of 2 by 12s—a bit old school but easily performed. It is recommended to not specify preservative- treated wood, coated screws and off-set joints.

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